• The Chapman Signing

    Posted by on December 8th, 2016 · Comments (1)

    At first, I thought, “This is stupid. Too much money and too many years.”

    But, if the Yankees want to pay him $400,000 per game, that’s their business, I suppose. And, Chapman would be 33 in the 5th year of the contract – and that’s not terrible.

    That said, here’s the real danger here: Aroldis is not a nice, or a smart, guy. Given someone like him that much money and putting him in New York is very, very, risky. This is not Mariano Rivera. This is not Andrew Miller. Sure…maybe I am wrong here. Mickey Rivers survived with the Yankees…for a while. Even if he doesn’t get in trouble, will Chapman continue to work hard now that he’s all the money? The jury is still out on that one too.

    Anyway, here’s the bigger concern: The reported opt-out after three years. We saw what the Yankees did with A-Rod and Sabathia. Two huge mistakes at opt-out time. Who’s to say they would not repeat the same mistake with Chapman? Then, the issue of too much money and too many years is a real thing.

    Given where the Yankees are today, it would not have broken my heart to let someone else sign Chapman – especially at those terms.

    José Quintana

    Posted by on December 8th, 2016 · Comments (1)

    Everyone wants to trade for José Quintana. And, why not?

    He’s left-handed. He’s only 27 years old. And, for the last FOUR YEARS at the big league level, he’s been a lock for 32 starts, 200 innings, and an ERA+ around 120.

    Oh, and, by the way, Brian Cashman let him go for nothing when he was just 22-years old.

    Said Cashman: “We looked at him as a fringy prospect. We offered him a minor-league contract to stay, but not a 40-man roster position. We didn’t feel he was ahead of other guys we gave spots to.”

    This from the man who spent $46 million on Kei Igawa.

    Starting Rotations With 3+ Aces, Since 1990

    Posted by on December 7th, 2016 · Comments (2)

    .
    Only the White Sox won a ring.

    Sir Dud

    Posted by on December 7th, 2016 · Comments (1)

    If Didi Gregorius plays 150+ games in 2017 and again has an OPS+ of less than 100 (as he’s done his whole career with respect to OPS+) then he will become only the 3rd Yankees player in franchise history to post 3 such seasons.  And, the first one to do it in a half-century.

    Rk Name Yrs From To Age
    1 Bobby Richardson 5 1960 1965 24-29 Ind. Seasons
    2 Everett Scott 3 1922 1924 29-31 Ind. Seasons
    3 Didi Gregorius 2 2015 2016 25-26 Ind. Seasons
    4 Melky Cabrera 2 2007 2009 22-24 Ind. Seasons
    5 Horace Clarke 2 1970 1971 30-31 Ind. Seasons
    6 Phil Rizzuto 2 1949 1952 31-34 Ind. Seasons
    7 Frankie Crosetti 2 1938 1939 27-28 Ind. Seasons
    8 Aaron Ward 2 1921 1922 24-25 Ind. Seasons
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 12/7/2016.

    .

    Gleyber Torres, Second Baseman?

    Posted by on December 7th, 2016 · Comments (1)

    Reportedly, a lot of scouts who watched the AFL this year feel that, in the long-term, Gleyber Torres will end up as a second baseman.

    This is interesting.

    The Yankees already moved Jorge Mateo towards second. Maybe he could end up as an outfielder with his speed?

    But, what about the Yankees future shortstop? They’ve already moved Tyler Wade into a utility type role. Kyle Holder, while 22, has yet to prove that he can even hit Double-A pitching.

    And, what about Nick Solak? Granted, he’s also far, far, away. But, does this push him to third?

    Of course, you still have Didi Gregorius for another three years. But, he’s yet to post a major league season with an OPS+ better than 97. And, the sabermetric stats tell us that he was not a great fielding SS last season. Don’t be shocked if he plays himself out of town next season or the one after.

    The Gap Between Boston & New York Just Got Wider

    Posted by on December 6th, 2016 · Comments (5)

    You win 93 games and then go out and add Chris Sale.

    Start planning on a Red Sox-Cubs World Series next year.

    Best Relief Pitchers Since 2011

    Posted by on December 5th, 2016 · Comments (0)
    Rk Player WAR From To Age G GS GF W L SV IP ERA FIP ERA+
    1 Craig Kimbrel 13.6 2011 2016 23-28 391 0 334 17 18 255 380.2 1.94 1.90 201
    2 Aroldis Chapman 13.1 2011 2016 23-28 368 0 270 21 19 182 363.2 2.08 1.90 191
    3 David Robertson 11.0 2011 2016 26-31 390 0 190 26 21 116 383.2 2.60 2.61 156
    4 Koji Uehara 10.9 2011 2016 36-41 332 0 175 16 16 80 327.0 2.17 2.64 196
    5 Kenley Jansen 10.4 2011 2016 23-28 384 0 268 18 13 185 381.2 2.31 1.93 160
    6 Darren O’Day 10.2 2011 2016 28-33 323 0 78 26 10 15 310.2 2.29 3.47 182
    7 Greg Holland 10.1 2011 2015 25-29 294 0 212 18 11 145 301.0 2.15 2.12 191
    8 Zach Britton 9.8 2011 2016 23-28 252 46 170 27 21 120 463.2 3.24 3.39 129
    9 Joaquin Benoit 9.6 2011 2016 33-38 376 0 108 26 15 42 366.2 2.58 3.36 155
    10 Tyler Clippard 9.4 2011 2016 26-31 431 0 115 27 23 55 436.1 2.72 3.56 145
    11 Mark Melancon 9.4 2011 2016 26-31 409 0 266 19 17 168 409.1 2.46 2.69 157
    12 Jonathan Papelbon 9.0 2011 2016 30-35 356 0 305 22 18 180 360.2 2.67 2.83 149
    13 Brad Ziegler 8.9 2011 2016 31-36 424 0 163 26 17 67 403.0 2.41 3.25 168
    14 Joe Smith 8.8 2011 2016 27-32 413 0 103 30 21 29 389.0 2.64 3.43 146
    15 Andrew Miller 8.7 2011 2016 26-31 310 12 108 28 15 49 334.1 2.80 2.71 151
    16 Tony Watson 8.6 2011 2016 26-31 403 0 64 26 13 20 386.1 2.56 3.45 148
    17 Dellin Betances 8.3 2011 2016 23-28 225 1 48 14 10 22 254.2 2.16 2.06 189
    18 Kelvin Herrera 8.2 2011 2016 21-26 351 0 69 19 23 17 356.1 2.63 3.01 159
    19 Wade Davis 8.0 2011 2016 25-30 299 53 92 41 25 47 572.1 3.37 3.42 118
    20 Alexi Ogando 7.7 2011 2016 27-32 239 48 50 29 17 4 461.2 3.66 4.12 117
    21 Glen Perkins 7.1 2011 2016 28-33 321 0 215 16 13 120 315.1 2.88 2.98 141
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 12/5/2016.

    .
    Can you spot the former Yankees?

    Gang Of Ninety-Nine

    Posted by on December 5th, 2016 · Comments (0)

    There are only 4 players in major league history with 2+ seasons of exactly 99 hits each season:

    Rk Name Yrs From To Age
    1 Russell Martin 2 2011 2013 28-30 Ind. Seasons
    2 Aaron Hill 2 2005 2016 23-34 Ind. Seasons
    3 Bucky Dent 2 1979 1983 27-31 Ind. Seasons
    4 Jim Hegan 2 1951 1954 30-33 Ind. Seasons
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 12/5/2016.

    .
    I’m just sayin’…

    Matt Holliday

    Posted by on December 4th, 2016 · Comments (0)

    Great way to piss away $13 million bucks.

    OK, kidding aside, strangely, he was a beast on the road last year. Not sure what that means?

    Yankees Prospects

    Posted by on December 3rd, 2016 · Comments (10)

    Greg Bird, Gleyber Torres, Clint Frazier, Gary Sanchez, Blake Rutherford, Jorge Mateo, and Aaron Judge.

    Luis Severino, James Kaprielian, Justus Sheffield, Chance Adams, Dustin Fowler, Domingo Acevedo and Jordan Montgomery.

    Tyler Austin, Rob Refsnyder, Mason Williams, Tyler Wade, Bryan Mitchell, Luis Cessa, Jonathan Holder and Ian Clarkin.

    Am I missing anyone?

    Pretty safe to say that the Yankees now have 15-20 legit prospects in their system for the first time in decades?

    The Bill James Handbook 2017

    Posted by on December 2nd, 2016 · Comments (0)

    I’ve been a fan of The Bill James Handbook since it started publishing in (June) 2003. Now, 15 editions later, we have The Bill James Handbook 2017 (which was released on November 1st.)

    On the back cover of this year’s book, John Dewan shares “The Multi-Dimensional Beauty of Baseball.” This is what he wrote:

    Some people are captivated by the pure physical beauty of ballparks—whether in the major or the minor leagues, on a college or high school campus, or just at a local park or playground. For example, when people see the ivy-covered walls of Wrigley Field—especially if it is in October when the leaves have already turned and baseball is still being played—they are transported to a magical place indeed. For others, the enjoyment of baseball is in watching one of the greatest games ever invented. There is nothing better than the drama of a close play at the plate, the grace of a fielder diving and catching a ball, or the excitement of a runner taking off to steal second base in a close game. For many of us, however, it’s the numbers of the game that provide our greatest enjoyment. Whether it is just keeping our own scorecard or understanding the nuances of On-base Plus Slugging (OPS) or Wins Above Replacement (WAR), baseball lends itself to statistical analysis perhaps better than any other human endeavor—or at least any other human endeavor that is so much fun!

    If that last part resonates with you, then you must get your hands on a copy of The Bill James Handbook 2017.

    Every year, this book gets better and better. And, that’s saying something since it was great when it first came out in 2003. Included in this year’s edition you can find:

    • Hits Gained and Lost to the Shift
    • Long Fly Out & Home Run Breakdowns
    • Pitcher Career Fastball Velocity Trends
    • Career Defensive Runs Saved
    • League Stats Breakdown by Position
    • Expanded Instant Replay Coverage
    • No-Hitter Summary
    • Home Run Robberies
    • Hitter Analysis
    • Career Baserunning – including total career baserunning numbers (2002-present) for players with 1000 or more games played
    • Pitcher Analysis – a brand new section for pitchers with at least 50 innings pitched with a table including: number of pitches thrown, batters faced, strikeouts, walks, fly balls, lines drives and more
    • Pitch Repertoire Section detailing pitch type breakdowns for all pitchers in baseball
    • Rotation vs. Bullpen team charts showcasing the strengths and weaknesses of each team’s pitching staff
    • Relief Pitcher Section
    • The Hall of Fame Monitor
    • The Fielding Bible Awards
    • Pitcher Projections
    • Hitter Projections
    • Baserunning Analysis
    • Manufactured Runs
    • Team Efficiency Summary
    • Player Win-Shares

    Where else can you find some of this information? And, the book comes out on November 1st – as soon as the season ends! Amazing.

    This is the book that should be on the desk of every member of a team’s Baseball Operations staff – from the President of Baseball Operations to the General Manager to the intern working spreadsheets. It should be next to the microphone of every major league broadcaster covering a game. Big league managers should have this book at their avail at all times.

    The data in this book is the code of the baseball matrix.

    If you’re a baseball fan who wants the truth, there’s a million reasons why you would want to have The Bill James Baseball Handbook 2017.

    Stats. Analysis. Essays. Reports. Leader boards. Projections. It’s all there in this one. The Bill James Baseball Handbook 2017 is the best of it’s kind and nothing else is close.

    Great #1′s

    Posted by on December 1st, 2016 · Comments (0)
    Player Yrs WAR ▾
    Ozzie Smith 19 76.45
    Lou Whitaker 19 74.88
    Pee Wee Reese 16 66.36
    Richie Ashburn 15 63.59
    Bobby Doerr 13 51.17
    Buddy Myer 11 46.90
    Tony Fernandez 14 45.05
    Earle Combs 7 42.51
    Rafael Furcal 6 39.05
    Tommy Holmes 10 34.31
    Eddie Yost 10 34.17
    Scott Fletcher 7 31.95
    Bobby Murcer 6 31.92
    Orlando Hudson 8 30.92
    Eddie Joost 8 30.72
    Brian Roberts 13 30.33
    Lance Johnson 12 30.05
    Luis Castillo 14 28.90
    Del Crandall 11 28.51
    Bobby Avila 10 27.81
    Garry Templeton 15 27.60
    Snuffy Stirnweiss 6 26.39
    Casey Blake 6 24.90
    Woody English 7 24.80
    Al Bumbry 13 24.44
    Elvis Andrus 8 24.07
    Whitey Kurowski 8 23.95
    Frankie Crosetti 8 23.92
    Mookie Wilson 15 22.16
    Jose Cardenal 14 20.65
    Jim Landis 8 20.57
    Dave Martinez 9 19.15
    Bernie Carbo 7 18.40
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
    Generated 12/1/2016.

    .
    Notable major leaguers who wore #1 for a long time in their career.  Less than 20 wore it for 10+ years.

    Rafael Palmeiro

    Posted by on November 30th, 2016 · Comments (7)

    This sounds crazy. Sincerely, even to myself as I pen these thoughts, it seems a tad bizarre. But, I think it’s time to give Rafael Palmeiro a buddy pass.

    Why?

    Timing and the times.

    Palmeiro’s career ran from 1986 through 2005. To me, that’s pretty much aligned perfectly with the steroid loosey-goosey period, as A-Rod liked to call it.

    While it’s hard to say when the PED thing blossomed, it’s not unreasonable to think it started around 1983 (give or take). And, we know that Major League Baseball did not roll out a PED policy with teeth until after the 2004 season. So, to me, 1983 (or so) through 2004 was the wild, wild west of PED use in baseball. People did what they wanted and had no marshal in town since the baseball establishment – owners, players and media – pretty much completely looked the other way. There were no baseball laws to break on PED use – and anyone using at that time was not breaking any baseball laws.

    Ah, yes, the law. There’s always “that.” Clearly, those using PEDs when Palmeiro played were breaking the law in that they most likely obtained the drugs illegally and were administering them without a medical doctor’s supervision. A crime? Sure…yes…no question. Then again, was it that much different from the 1950′s, 60′s and 70′s when players, with the clubs’ somewhat blessing, were taking greenies (like candy) which were being used without a doctor’s script and coming from shady sources? Further, last time I checked, no one has been ever kept out of the Hall of Fame because they drank coffee everyday laced with amphetamines (supplied in the clubhouse before games in the “old days.”)

    No, I haven’t forgotten about the time when Palmeiro emphatically wagged his finger back in March of 2005, claiming that he never used PEDs.

    However, think about it:  What was he supposed to say at that point? If he tried to plead the Fifth like McGwire or pretend that he didn’t speak English like Sosa, he would have been branded as being a user. And, if no one else was going to confess at that time, why should he?

    “He cheated!,” many probably still want to say here. Well…you can say that…but, he “cheated” to do better on the field. This is not like the 1919 White Sox where people were throwing baseball games. There is an old saying in baseball: “If you’re not cheating, you’re not trying.” Guys doctor baseballs, steal signs, withhold medical information, fake dates of birth, add inches to their height and shave pounds off their weight, and do other things like that in baseball – all the time. If “cheating” is bending or dancing around the rules, then there’s all sorts of cheating going on in baseball whether folks are called on it or not.

    In the end, I am somewhat confident that Rafael Palmeiro will be the modern-day Shoeless Joe Jackson. One hundred years will pass and he’ll still be on the outside, looking in.

    Maybe, if someone like Jim Thome, Frank Thomas or Jeff Bagwell gets outed for PED use after they were elected to the Hall of Fame, it will open a door for someone like Palmeiro to have their career re-examined?

    In the meantime, it will be McGwire, Sosa and Palmeiro. They’re the PED poster boys. Nothing really to do at this point but to wear it.

    The Class Of 1968-1982

    Posted by on November 29th, 2016 · Comments (7)
    Rk Player WAR/pos From To Age G PA HR RBI BB SB BA OBP SLG
    1 Joe Morgan 81.4 1968 1982 24-38 1980 8498 221 904 1432 602 .275 .397 .438
    2 Rod Carew 74.7 1968 1982 22-36 1983 8557 77 850 820 333 .334 .398 .440
    3 Johnny Bench 74.4 1968 1982 20-34 2022 8247 376 1316 862 68 .269 .345 .480
    4 Reggie Jackson 74.3 1968 1982 22-36 2136 8809 463 1380 1055 215 .273 .365 .515
    6 Pete Rose 62.5 1968 1982 27-41 2340 10779 109 862 1105 139 .313 .387 .425
    7 Reggie Smith 61.4 1968 1982 23-37 1823 7395 299 1031 833 121 .291 .371 .499
    8 Graig Nettles 60.3 1968 1982 23-37 1989 8021 313 1011 835 31 .250 .330 .425
    11 Carl Yastrzemski 59.1 1968 1982 28-42 2125 8948 303 1206 1260 116 .279 .380 .454
    16 Tony Perez 49.4 1968 1982 26-40 2095 8735 321 1343 768 47 .282 .345 .473
    17 Ted Simmons 48.4 1968 1982 18-32 1801 7444 209 1087 679 11 .291 .355 .453
    22 Willie Stargell 45.9 1968 1982 28-42 1707 6555 363 1129 744 12 .283 .368 .540
    27 Al Oliver 43.9 1968 1982 21-35 1996 8374 206 1163 452 79 .305 .346 .462
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 11/29/2016.

    .

    Reggie. Top 4. Close to being #2.

    Chris Carter

    Posted by on November 28th, 2016 · Comments (1)

    This has Cashman written all over it.

    BHM. (Big Hairy Monster.)

    Ten Kids

    Posted by on November 27th, 2016 · Comments (2)

    Is it possible that all ten of these players will be on the Yankees Opening Day roster in 2017?

    Tyler Austin
    Luis Cessa
    Nick Goody
    Aaron Judge
    Rob Refsnyder
    Gary Sanchez
    Ronald Torreyes
    Greg Bird
    Bryan Mitchell
    Dellin Betances

    My Rules

    Posted by on November 21st, 2016 · Comments (10)

    I keep reading that the Yankees are going to sign at least two “big free agents” this off-season.

    Boy…would that be a mistake.

    This stuff has to stop. In a perfect world, barring a Jeter or Rivera type situation which is far and few between, I wish the Yankees never had a player over the age of 35…AND…had no one on their payroll making more than $17 million a year.

    Old players and $100 million dollar contracts are a death sentence these days. The Yankees should have learned that by now. Of course, they still have Cashman as a G.M. as well. And, that means they don’t learn from mistakes.

    Sad.

    Goodbye Brian McCann

    Posted by on November 17th, 2016 · Comments (11)

    Wow.

    McCann PLUS cash for two pitchers who have never faced a batter in Double-A.

    Geesh.

     

    Tanaka Vs. deGrom 2014-2016

    Posted by on November 17th, 2016 · Comments (1)
    Player WAR From To Age G GS W L W-L% BB SO ERA FIP ERA+ BF
    Masahiro Tanaka 11.7 2014 2016 25-27 75 75 39 16 .709 84 445 3.12 3.53 132 1956
    Jacob deGrom 11.6 2014 2016 26-28 76 76 30 22 .577 117 492 2.74 2.88 138 1920
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 11/17/2016.

    .
    The WAR, Games, ERA+ and Batters Faced numbers are almost identical.

    Yankees, OPS+ 125 or Better, 2,500+ PA

    Posted by on November 14th, 2016 · Comments (1)
    Rk Player OPS+ PA From To Age G R H 2B HR RBI BB SO SB BA OBP SLG
    1 Babe Ruth 209 9199 1920 1934 25-39 2084 1959 2518 424 659 1978 1852 1122 110 .349 .484 .711
    2 Lou Gehrig 179 9663 1923 1939 20-36 2164 1888 2721 534 493 1995 1508 790 102 .340 .447 .632
    3 Mickey Mantle 172 9907 1951 1968 19-36 2401 1676 2415 344 536 1509 1733 1710 153 .298 .421 .557
    4 Joe DiMaggio 155 7672 1936 1951 21-36 1736 1390 2214 389 361 1537 790 369 30 .325 .398 .579
    5 Charlie Keller 152 4466 1939 1952 22-35 1066 712 1053 163 184 723 760 481 45 .286 .410 .518
    6 Reggie Jackson 148 2707 1977 1981 31-35 653 380 661 115 144 461 326 573 41 .281 .371 .526
    7 Jason Giambi 143 3693 2002 2008 31-37 897 515 764 134 209 604 619 706 9 .260 .404 .521
    8 Roger Maris 139 3475 1960 1966 25-31 850 520 797 110 203 547 413 417 7 .265 .356 .515
    9 Alex Rodriguez 136 6520 2004 2016 28-40 1509 1012 1580 263 351 1096 779 1292 152 .283 .378 .523
    10 Rickey Henderson 135 2735 1985 1989 26-30 596 513 663 119 78 255 406 281 326 .288 .395 .455
    11 Dave Winfield 134 5021 1981 1990 29-38 1172 722 1300 236 205 818 477 652 76 .290 .356 .495
    12 Tommy Henrich 132 5409 1937 1950 24-37 1284 901 1297 269 183 795 712 383 37 .282 .382 .491
    13 Bobby Murcer 129 4997 1965 1983 19-37 1256 641 1231 192 175 687 491 564 74 .278 .349 .453
    14 Bill Skowron 129 4102 1954 1962 23-31 1087 518 1103 173 165 672 278 588 14 .294 .346 .496
    15 Don Mattingly 127 7722 1982 1995 21-34 1785 1007 2153 442 222 1099 588 444 14 .307 .358 .471
    16 Bill Dickey 127 7065 1928 1946 21-39 1789 930 1969 343 202 1209 678 289 36 .313 .382 .486
    17 George Selkirk 127 3322 1934 1942 26-34 846 503 810 131 108 576 486 319 49 .290 .400 .483
    18 Robinson Cano 126 5791 2005 2013 22-30 1374 799 1649 375 204 822 350 689 38 .309 .355 .504
    19 Bernie Williams 125 9053 1991 2006 22-37 2076 1366 2336 449 287 1257 1069 1212 147 .297 .381 .477
    20 Paul O’Neill 125 5368 1993 2001 30-38 1254 720 1426 304 185 858 586 710 80 .303 .377 .492
    21 Yogi Berra 125 8350 1946 1963 21-38 2116 1174 2148 321 358 1430 704 411 30 .285 .348 .483
    22 Earle Combs 125 6513 1924 1935 25-36 1456 1186 1866 309 58 633 670 278 98 .325 .397 .462
    23 Birdie Cree 125 2989 1908 1915 25-32 742 345 761 117 11 332 269 274 132 .292 .368 .398
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 11/14/2016.

    .
    Look at Reggie.  No wonder why they named a candy bar after him.

    50+ Games As A Yankee OPS+ 140 or Better

    Posted by on November 14th, 2016 · Comments (1)

    Crazy list.

    Rk Player OPS+ G From To Age PA
    1 Babe Ruth 209 2084 1920 1934 25-39 9199
    2 Lou Gehrig 179 2164 1923 1939 20-36 9663
    3 Mickey Mantle 172 2401 1951 1968 19-36 9907
    4 Gary Sanchez 166 55 2015 2016 22-23 231
    5 Joe DiMaggio 155 1736 1936 1951 21-36 7672
    6 Charlie Keller 152 1066 1939 1952 22-35 4466
    7 Bobby Bonds 151 145 1975 1975 29-29 626
    8 Reggie Jackson 148 653 1977 1981 31-35 2707
    9 Ron Blomberg 148 400 1969 1976 20-27 1324
    10 Dale Long 146 81 1960 1963 34-37 175
    11 Jason Giambi 143 897 2002 2008 31-37 3693
    12 Don Bollweg 142 70 1953 1953 32-32 178
    13 Oscar Gamble 141 540 1976 1984 26-34 1707
    14 Jack Lelivelt 141 54 1912 1913 26-27 184
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 11/14/2016.

    .

    Giambi = Reggie + Blomberg.

    What A Game!

    Posted by on November 3rd, 2016 · Comments (8)

    The 10 best World Series Game Seven contests just may be 2016, 2014, 2001, 1997, 1991, 1962, 1960, 1946, 1926, and 1924. In terms of grabbing national attention, for sundry reasons, you could slice the list down to 2016, 2001, 1991 and 1960 as the top four – with TV coverage giving them an assist. Picking which one of these four is the best Game Seven ever would be difficult. One thing to note is that the home team won in 1960, 1991 and 2001 – and that was not the case in 2016. This adds the element of the winning team still needing to get 3 outs to win, compared to walking off with the victory. Perhaps this additional degree of difficulty makes 2016 stand out a bit more?

    Tonight’s Game 7 In Cleveland

    Posted by on November 2nd, 2016 · Comments (5)

    This season, Kyle Hendricks, on the road, in a hitter’s ballpark, is a good pitcher – but, not a great one. That said, expect to see Jon Lester in this game tonight at some point for the Cubs. And, when that happens, Cleveland better be aggressive on the bases. (And, maybe that’s a reason for Francona to play Guyer, Davis and Crisp in the outfield tonight and bench Chisenhall and Naquin?) On the flip side, Corey Kluber should be good for 50 pitches and 4 effective innings tonight, at the least. Then, you’re going to see Shaw, Miller and Allen. Of course, Schwarber, Rizzo, Bryant, Zobrist and company can swing the bats. But, good pitching beats good hitting. If Kluber, Shaw, Miller and Allen are on tonight, I see Cleveland winning a close contest. To me, that’s the key to the game tonight: Cleveland’s best pitchers against Chicago’s great hitters. Whomever wins those battles will win the war.

    One Away

    Posted by on October 30th, 2016 · Comments (4)

    Since they went to the wildcard format in baseball, in the past 21 years, only the 1998 & 1999 Yankees, and the 2005 White Sox, have won World Series rings while losing two games or less during their post-season run.  (’99 Yanks and ’05 Chisox lost one.  ’98 Yanks lost two.)  With a win tonight, Cleveland can join the club.

    Modern Day Rushmore

    Posted by on October 27th, 2016 · Comments (6)

    Since 1973, there have ONLY been FOUR Yankees players to have 10+ seasons with the team where they played enough to qualify for the league batting title:

    Rk Name Yrs From To Age
    1 Derek Jeter 18 1996 2014 22-40 Ind. Seasons
    2 Bernie Williams 13 1993 2005 24-36 Ind. Seasons
    3 Don Mattingly 11 1984 1995 23-34 Ind. Seasons
    4 Willie Randolph 10 1977 1987 22-32 Ind. Seasons
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 10/27/2016.

    .

    And, it’s going to be a long time before someone joins this group.

    Somebody Has To Go, Right?

    Posted by on October 27th, 2016 · Comments (4)

    At the major league level, the Yankees have Gardner, Ellsbury and Hicks in the outfield next year. (Yeah, for some stupid reason, they love Hicks.)

    However, they also have Aaron Judge, Clint Frazier and Tyler Austin very close in the wings. (I say Austin expecting Bird to play first.) And, there’s more outfielders very close and knocking on the door. You’ve got Dustin Fowler, Mark Payton…and maybe even Mason Williams or Billy McKinney (although I am not too high on the latter two). And, don’t discount Blake Rutherford being a fast mover.

    I know the Yankees would love to unload Ellsbury. But, that’s not going to happen.

    Sure smells like Gardner is going to get traded this off-season, no?

    Cubs-Indians World Series

    Posted by on October 23rd, 2016 · Comments (2)

    Mr. Miller and Mr. Chapman meet again!

    This is actually a pretty cool Fall Classic match-up. Maybe the most interesting in a while.

    Of course, the Cubs are STACKED. And, everyone wants them to win because it’s been since 1908, they have a curse, etc. Then again, the Indians have their thing with 1948 as well.

    Don’t discount Cleveland.

    Boston was better than them. Ditto Toronto. And, they beat them both. Francona just may be the best post-season manager in baseball history – at least in modern-day baseball history.

    I would not be annoyed if either team won. I suppose that I am rooting for the Indians because they are the Cinderella team and it’s more than likely they won’t get too many other shots – whereas the Cubs may be great for a while.

    Hopefully, it will be a great series. We had a pretty good one in 2014. But, I want this one to be better. Something along the lines of 1975 or 2001 would be nice. Even the level of 2011 or 1997 would be cool. Give us something memorable…

    Sophie’s Choice

    Posted by on October 5th, 2016 · Comments (18)

    Full disclosure: I never saw the movie.

    In any event, the next 12 months in Yankeeland are the best possible time to finally get rid of Brian Cashman. If it doesn’t happen during that time, it’s probably not going to happen until the 2020′s. (Ugh!)

    For the LAST FOUR years, the Yankees have been an 85 win team. (The record speaks for itself – 85, 84, 87 and 84 is an average of 85, on the nose.)

    If they pull another 85 or less, that may be enough to send Cashman packing. You don’t have to pay a GM what the Yankees are paying Cashman to get an 85 win team. For sure, if they tank and put up a losing record, that should be “Bye-bye Brian!”

    But, if the Yankees do win less than 86 games in 2017, it’s probably the end for Joe Girardi as well. And, that would be sad. He’s a good man and a solid manager. In fact, if not for him, the Yankees would be more like a 79 win team each of the last four seasons. If anything, Girardi has saved Cashman’s bacon since 2013.

    WWHD? (What would Hal do?)

    If Yankee ownership had to choose between Cashman or Girardi to take the hit for a poor 2017, which one would get whacked?

    I suspect it would be Joe.

    Cashman, Trost and Levine have themselves dug in deeper than an Alabama tick and are super insulated. Plus, they have unity and Girardi is a man on an island.

    Cashman survived Meanwell. In fact, he had her “taken care of” faster than you can say “Vincent Foster.”

    Something big has to happen in the next 12 months to free Yankeeland of Cashman. Bigger than Carl Pavano, Kei Igawa or Javy Vazquez. Worse than Stephen Drew, Jacoby Ellsbury, Travis Hafner, Garrett Jones or Kevin Youkilis. It can’t just be another Cito Culver, Ty Hensley, C.J. Henry or Andrew Brackman. Cashman has proven none of that stuff sticks.

    I don’t know…what do you think it would take? And, if it happened, would it be Girardi or Cashman who would be let go when it happens?

    Me, At The Yankees Game Yesterday

    Posted by on October 2nd, 2016 · Comments (2)

    Yankees Game 100116

    At the VERY LAST MINUTE, my son and I decided to go to the Yankees game yesterday. That’s us in the green box, above. (Click on the image to enlarge it.) It was our first time at the Stadium in a while. (We didn’t go at all last year.)

    He had nothing to do and was bored. It was Game 161 on a gray day. They were giving out bobble-heads. And, the seats were $25 each on StubHub. I figured it would be easy getting in and out, etc. So, why not?

    By the way, they “announced” the “paid” attendance at 33,222. Boy, that’s magic. Every section was at least half empty, or more, and there were a few sections that were totally empty. What did they have, like 13,000 who bought tickets and didn’t show? Really?

    Anyway, what I found interesting was that the seats we had, while nice, did not give you the whole view of the field. We could not see anything in right field. Basically, any ball hit towards right that was more than 200 feet, we had to guess what happened based on the crowd reaction or the runners on base.

    I think those tickets go for $50 each at full price. For that amount, shouldn’t you be able to see the whole field?

    Yankees 2016 – History In The Making!

    Posted by on September 28th, 2016 · Comments (8)

    No, not Gary Sanchez…

    The 2016 Yankees have a chance to become ONLY THE SECOND YANKEES TEAM EVER to have THREE players appear in 100+ games EACH and EACH have more strikeouts than hits. Yes, Chase Headley, Mark Teixeira and Brian McCann…we are watching you. (All Cashman imports, by the way and for the record.)

    The only other time the Yankees did it? That would be that glorious 1990 squad with Steve Balboni, Jesse Barfield and Bob Geren doing the honors.

    Next Page »