• Move Over Cavity Sam

    Posted by on May 17th, 2006 · Comments (22)

    pavanooperation.jpg

    Here comes Carl!

    From the AP:

    Yankees RHP Carl Pavano left his rehabilitation start for Double-A Trenton against Portland after one inning because of tightness in his right triceps. He was to be evaluated Thursday at Yankee Stadium by team physician Dr. Stuart Hershon.

    Was there ever any doubt that those tweezers were going to set off the buzzer again before Zuzu had to come back to the Bronx?

    Comments on Move Over Cavity Sam

    1. baileywalk
      May 17th, 2006 | 11:17 pm

      It’s now officially impossible to defend Carl Pavano. This is just unbelievable. He was pitching well in his rehab starts, and it looked like he was just building up arm strength. Now this. I refuse to believe he’s “faking” injuries and I don’t think it’s about pressure. I think it’s just like with his old teammate A.J. Burnett and the Brewers’ Ben Sheets and the Cubs’ Kerry Wood — he just can’t stay healthy.

      Hopefully it’s nothing and he can pitch again in a few days (by the way, he made the exhausted Trenton bullpen have to save the game and now their consecutive-scoreless-innings stretch is over). But unless he gets back to the Bronx, I’m not going to expect him to ever pitch for this team this year — or, maybe, ever.

    2. brockdc
      May 18th, 2006 | 12:12 am

      Pavano’s worthless. Even if, by some miracle, he does return this season, we all know it won’t be long until he returns to the 60-day DL with severely chapped lips. Personally, I have nothing against the guy. But I’d be lying if I didn’t admit that a part of me wishes for him to have an injury so severe that it would force him into retirement, and thus, a voided contract.

    3. MJ
      May 18th, 2006 | 12:20 am

      I mean, come on, is anyone really surprised about this? Carl Pavano is so damn delicate. He’s freakin’ worthless and a terrible waste of the Yankees’ time.

    4. JeremyM
      May 18th, 2006 | 12:38 am

      Oh man, severe chapped lips? The best I could come up with was a hang nail. Classic stuff.

    5. Don
      May 18th, 2006 | 2:59 am

      Of course he might really be hurt. Yankee fans… so negative it’s tiresome.

    6. Yu Hsing Chen
      May 18th, 2006 | 5:27 am

      It’s hard to be positive about a guy that’s been out for almost a year with no surgery and nothing broken or teared…..

      Would anyone be surprised if Matsui returns before this guy? let alone Sheffield..

    7. MJ
      May 18th, 2006 | 9:04 am

      Don, I can’t speak for anyone else but I am not saying he isn’t really hurt. I think that’s kind of the point – he’s ALWAYS hurt. I don’t think it’s negativity as much as sheer frustration. I truly wish the Yankees had never signed him. I don’t know whose idea it was but they really should have their head examined. Anyone that couldn’t see this pattern of injuries in his past and couldn’t project it to the future obviously wasn’t paying attention. Fragile players don’t get more durable over time…

    8. TomP
      May 18th, 2006 | 9:33 am

      I think you guys are a little too generous. How could he possibly be hurt, with the way he’s been babied this last year? I think Pavano is just mentally weak, and that the main problem now is that he’s afraid of actually having to show something after this extended vacation. I would just bring him on in, and see what he does or doesn’t have. I’m worried that waiting for him like this is going to prevent the team from looking for real pitching help until it’s too late.

    9. Raf
      May 18th, 2006 | 9:45 am

      I think you guys are a little too generous. How could he possibly be hurt, with the way he’s been babied this last year? I think Pavano is just mentally weak, and that the main problem now is that he’s afraid of actually having to show something after this extended vacation.
      =================================
      Hardly. He was brittle as a RSox, as a Expo, and as a Marlin. Why should we expect anything else as a Yankee?

      Being “mentally weak” hardly has anything to do with it.

    10. May 18th, 2006 | 10:48 am

      How about “newly a multi-millionaire” instead of “mentally weak” as a reason?

    11. baileywalk
      May 18th, 2006 | 11:00 am

      People who think Pavano is scared to pitch or is inventing injuries have an active imagination. I think he, like Burnett, simply won’t pitch with any discomfort. If Pavano was “scared” and didn’t want to pitch for New York (so scared that he refuses to pitch at all), he would either retire, work out a deal to void his contract (which the Yankees would love to do) or demand a trade. The fact that Pavano keeps doing these rehab starts means he wants to come back, but his body won’t allow it.

      Does anyone here know exactly how baseball insurance works? I know teams take insurance out on their players, but it seems like it’s impossible to recoup (unless your name is Mo Vaughn). Kevin Brown continually broke down, and at one point broke his hand punching a wall, and yet the Yankees couldn’t recoup money. Pavano is probably going to be out a year — and may not even play this season — so exactly when are teams allowed to collect on this? What’s the point of paying for insurance if you don’t ever get paid?

    12. Raf
      May 18th, 2006 | 11:23 am

      How about “newly a multi-millionaire” instead of “mentally weak” as a reason?
      ===============

      Courtesy of baseball-reference

      Salaries (Leaders)
      1998 Montreal Expos $170,000
      1999 Montreal Expos $225,000
      2000 Montreal Expos $255,000
      2001 Montreal Expos $1,300,000
      2002 Montreal Expos $1,312,500
      2003 Florida Marlins $1,500,000
      2004 Florida Marlins $3,800,000
      2005 New York Yankees $9,000,000
      Career (may be incomplete) $17,562,500

      He should’ve been a multimillionaire before he came to the Bx.

      Should’ve signed Pedro…

    13. TomP
      May 18th, 2006 | 11:55 am

      I think he, like Burnett, simply won’t pitch with any discomfort.
      ===============
      Sure, but why not? My sense is that he’s afraid to fail. He may /want/ to pitch (he’s a professional pitcher, right), but he doesn’t want to embarrass himself by pitching poorly, and so if he doesn’t feel perfect, he’d rather sit. That’s what it looks like to me at any rate, based on his statements and actions. I’d love to know what his teammates really think about him; I can’t imagine he’s inspiring anyone with his courageous comeback.

    14. May 18th, 2006 | 12:09 pm

      Raf – but, in NY, he now has the security of the long-term deal – he never had that before. It’s a lot easier to baby things when you know you’re getting millions for years to come – no matter what.

    15. hopbitters
      May 18th, 2006 | 12:19 pm

      He’s embarassed himself by pitching poorly for pretty much every year he’s played, except 2000 and 2004. Much like I don’t really buy athletes magically cranking up their skills in contract years (in general), I don’t believe there are a whole lot of guys who would sit on the sidelines if they could play. At some point, however, you really have to question someone who has unrelated injuries of a seemingly minor (relative to his recovery time) nature that perfectly overlap to prevent him from doing almost anything to benefit the team he’s soaking for millions of dollars.

      “60-day DL with severely chapped lips” : That’s good stuff. Do they give Pulitzers for blog comments?

    16. MJ
      May 18th, 2006 | 12:36 pm

      In the end, who cares if Pavano is seriously hurt or if he’s just “mentally weak” or whatever else. The point is that, for whatever reason, be they real or imagined, he’s again crapping out on the Yankees. The biggest problem in all of this is that whoever signed him thought it was a good idea. I don’t know if that someone is Steinbrenner or Cashman but whoever it was is an idiot. One look at the back of his baseball card should’ve told that anonymous decision maker all they needed to know about how fragile he was/is.

    17. Sandman42
      May 18th, 2006 | 12:53 pm

      The idiot who signed him probably wanted to be part of the Carl-a-Palooza sweeping the nation at the time. The Yankees were not the only idiots, just the richest. Remember he had interest from the Tigers, Marlins, Phillies, Orioles, Yankees and Red Sox.

    18. baileywalk
      May 18th, 2006 | 1:04 pm

      Stop with this “what idiot wanted him?” stuff. EVERY TEAM IN BASEBALL who needed a pitcher wanted Pavano. Theo and the Sox wanted him. The Angels wanted him. EVERYONE wanted him. The owner of the Tigers offered him fifty million and a pizza franchise (no joke) to get him. Pavano had many offers and CHOSE the Yanks. They wanted him, but it was his choice.

    19. MJ
      May 18th, 2006 | 1:28 pm

      Then all I can say is that they’re all idiots. I’ll never be convinced that it was wise to sign a player whose medical file was several pages long. I only wish Pavano had chosen another team. He’s been a complete and utter waste of time.

    20. hopbitters
      May 18th, 2006 | 1:31 pm

      Right, NY wasn’t the only idiot, just the prize-winning idiot. Go team.

    21. Raf
      May 18th, 2006 | 1:50 pm

      Raf – but, in NY, he now has the security of the long-term deal – he never had that before. It’s a lot easier to baby things when you know you’re getting millions for years to come – no matter what
      ===========
      A player, in theory, is set for life by the time they reach free agency.

      Your theory is disproven because, as shown, he already has millions.

      He’s going to get his money, no matter what. Note that despite his track record of mediocrity, that his salary never took a step back.

      As long as he isn’t a 10-5 player, he will never have security; a team can trade him or release him.

    22. Raf
      May 18th, 2006 | 1:54 pm

      Sure, but why not? My sense is that he’s afraid to fail. He may /want/ to pitch (he’s a professional pitcher, right), but he doesn’t want to embarrass himself by pitching poorly, and so if he doesn’t feel perfect, he’d rather sit.
      ================
      Given his track record, I’d have to say that fear of failure isn’t one of his concerns

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