• WWRSND?

    Posted by on October 18th, 2006 · Comments (15)

    Many fans of the Boston Red Sox have always liked to make a certain statement about the Yankees Derek Jeter.

    Watching some of the 2006 NLCS, I have to wonder what the members of Red Sox Nation would say about the Mets’ Jose Reyes – if they had to watch Reyes do that little “happy dance” that he does each time something good happens for the Mets – 19 times a season?

    When I see Jose Reyes start to break into his “Ricky Martin meets Danny Terrio” Rumba-Routine, one word always comes to mind – and it’s “Agador.” Of course, I should qualify this observation with the disclaimer of “Not that there’s anything wrong with that!”

    Comments on WWRSND?

    1. JeremyM
      October 19th, 2006 | 12:38 am

      Yeah, his dance is ridiculous, but his leadoff homer was pretty smooth. Wagner’s near-meltdown was fun to watch- Taguchi flat-out owns him. Cardinals played another sloppy game and it cost them.

      So what’s worse, having to choose your game 7 LCS starter from Oliver Perez, Steve Trachsel, and Darren Oliver or Kevin Brown, Javier Vazquez, and Esteban Loiaza? I think Perez is as wrong a choice as Brown was, and I predict Darren Oliver will be in by the 2nd inning anyway so they should just start with him. Perez’s start was only servicable in the context of the game that it occurred in, otherwise, 5 runs in 6 innings or so is God awful. Game 7′s are always fun.

    2. Garcia
      October 19th, 2006 | 8:11 am

      F- Red Sox Nation and their stupid shirts.

      I’ve never seen a fanbase so willing to dress up in ridiculous clothing that makes look foolish and stupid more than Sux fans. Maybe Raider fans are tied for #1 with the Sux.

      I don’t like hating on Reyes….I hate the constant comparisons with Jeter too. For me they aren’t the same type of players, though they play the same position. It’s like comparing a drop-back passer (Tom Brady) in football with a running quarterback (i.e Michael Vick). They play the same position but they do it differently.

    3. Raf
      October 19th, 2006 | 9:49 am

      I don’t mind such displays of emotion, I enjoy it, actually. The fans seem to like it too.

      As for RSN, who gives a (expletive deleted)? :)
      I agree wholeheartedly with Garcia. Such an angry & bitter fanbase.

      I don’t like hating on Reyes either. Also makes no sense to compare him to Jeter. The only thing they have in common is that they both play shortstop in NYC. That’s it.

    4. Raf
      October 19th, 2006 | 10:00 am

      So what’s worse, having to choose your game 7 LCS starter from Oliver Perez, Steve Trachsel, and Darren Oliver or Kevin Brown, Javier Vazquez, and Esteban Loiaza?
      ======================
      It’s definately a tossup. Mets don’t have many options; Traschel on normal rest or Perez on short rest? Both stunk it up during the regular season as well as the postseason.

      Should be an interesting game tonight.

    5. October 19th, 2006 | 10:10 am

      Maybe I’m an old-timer, but, if Reyes hits a HR off me to lead-off a game, to make the score 1-0 with no outs in the first, and then he does that dance of his in front of the dugout (after he crosses home plate) and then does the dance again once he’s in the dugout, where I can still see it, I’m sticking one in his ribs when I face him again.

      I probably would not do it in Game 6 of an LCS – because you don’t want to risk a run by giving him a free base, but, I’ll remember that dance the next time I see him in a regular season game and I would send a message.

      Nothing near the head, of course. Just a nice fastball to the ribcage – as a thank you for dance the last time.

      It’s a baseball field – it’s not Soul Train. Leave the end-zone dancing for the NFL. It has no place in baseball.

      If a pitcher danced on the mound, like Reyes dances, after each strike-out, he would be a wanted man. This is no different.

    6. JeremyM
      October 19th, 2006 | 10:22 am

      Steve, you mean like Jose Lima:) I don’t particularly care for that stuff myself, but things have changed- guys watch their homers (sometimes they even watch their singles when it bounces off the top of the wall), throw their bats in the air, take curtain calls in the first inning, etc. The game has changed. I would argue that this stuff is for the worse, but a section of the fanbase probably enjoys it.

      And you know what they’ll say after a guy is intentionally drilled? “It’s a baseball field- it’s not WWF. Leave the rough stuff for Ultimate Fighting. It has no place in baseball.” :)

    7. October 19th, 2006 | 10:32 am

      What’s become of the sport of baseball when Neon Deion stuff is found to be acceptable by the fans?

      Then again, what does that say about our society as a whole?

    8. Garcia
      October 19th, 2006 | 10:33 am

      Steve – I also think there’s a difference in the person doing it and whether there’s malice. I don’t see the malice in Reyes, he’s just trying to have fun and he really doesn’t seem to be doing anything to show up the pitcher. I understand what you are saying, but I don’t see it as Reyes showing off. In contrast, Milledge does seem to have that problem where he’s a show-off. Sometimes you have to apply a little logic in some situations.

    9. Raf
      October 19th, 2006 | 10:46 am

      Maybe I’m an old-timer, but, if Reyes hits a HR off me to lead-off a game, to make the score 1-0 with no outs in the first, and then he does that dance of his in front of the dugout (after he crosses home plate) and then does the dance again once he’s in the dugout, where I can still see it, I’m sticking one in his ribs when I face him again.
      =========
      Good. Just remember that after you throw the ball I still have the bat :). Maybe I’ll use it to go upside the catcher’s head (Marichal-Roseboro), maybe I’ll throw it at you (Campaneris-LaGrow), maybe after a fight ensues, you’ll get bodyslammed on your shoulder (Bill Lee), or while throwing a punch to defend yourself, blow out your shoulder (Brien Taylor).

      Is it really worth it?

      Don’t like giving up HR’s, make better pitches.

    10. Raf
      October 19th, 2006 | 10:53 am

      What’s become of the sport of baseball when Neon Deion stuff is found to be acceptable by the fans?

      Then again, what does that say about our society as a whole?
      =================
      It says they like to be entertained.

      This isn’t any different than Pedro bowing to a fielder after a good play. This isn’t any different from the antics of “The Mad Hungarian”, Brad “The Animal” Leslie, Dennis Eckersley, Pascual Perez, Carlos Perez, Jose Lima, Joaquin Andujar, Turk Wendell, etc. No different from Rickey’s “snatch catch,” Mickey Rivers’ & Jim Leyritz’s bat twirl, Oscar Gamble’s bat flip, Reggie’s trot, etc, etc, etc.

    11. jamesonandwater
      October 19th, 2006 | 11:07 am

      It says they like to be entertained.
      ====

      Yeah. I don’t watch american football so I’ve no idea what those players do in end zones or elsewhere, but I love to see young guys fired up adn having fun whether it’s baseball, rugby, football, whatever. Gawd knows I don’t get that much enjoyment out of my job.

      I find all the harkening back to old uniforms, “the way it was done”, etc a bit bizarre. It’s just a game.

    12. October 19th, 2006 | 11:41 am

      ~~~Don’t like giving up HR’s, make better pitches.~~~

      I don’t think it’s allowing the HR that warrants the HBP. It’s the dance. You hit my pitch, shame on me. You rub it in my face with a dance, shame on you.

    13. christopher
      October 19th, 2006 | 11:53 am

      Then again, what does that say about our society as a whole?
      ============

      So dancing is bad, but throwing a fastball at someone’s ribs and potentially injuring them is ok? What does that say about our society as a whole?

    14. Raf
      October 19th, 2006 | 12:07 pm

      I don’t think it’s allowing the HR that warrants the HBP. It’s the dance. You hit my pitch, shame on me. You rub it in my face with a dance, shame on you.
      =============
      The dance is part of the package. Nothing about Reyes indicates that he’s showing anyone up. The crowd likes it, his teammates like it, he likes it. It’s part of who he is. It’s his personality. Baseball NEEDS players with personality. Baseball has always had players with personality.

      There isn’t any pointing towards the pitcher, there aren’t any staredowns while going around the bases, nothing to indicate that Reyes is showing up the pitcher.

      It appears the league doesn’t take exception to his dancing either; this season he only had one HBP. Three overall during his time in the majors.

    15. October 19th, 2006 | 2:08 pm

      ~~~So dancing is bad, but throwing a fastball at someone’s ribs and potentially injuring them is ok? What does that say about our society as a whole?~~~

      Well, to quote A. Bunker, “Revenge, it’s the best way of getting even.”
      ;-)

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