• Boras: A-Rod Will Be In The Bronx In 2007

    Posted by on October 25th, 2006 · Comments (30)

    From Sam Borden of the News -

    Speculation about the possibility of Alex Rodriguez getting traded will surely linger until he actually takes the field at the Stadium on Opening Day, but the embattled third baseman’s agent said yesterday that he has received assurances from GM Brian Cashman that there will be no A-Rod auction this winter.

    Scott Boras, who negotiated Rodriguez’s 10-year, $252 million contract, said he recently got a phone call from Cashman in which the GM was adamant that Rodriguez isn’t going anywhere.

    “Brian Cashman and I had a discussion and he made it clear that he has no intention of trading Alex,” Boras told the Daily News, “and I told him that Alex Rodriguez has a no-trade clause.”

    Boras then added, “There will be no movement of Alex Rodriguez this offseason.”

    When reading this, I think back to what Steve Kelley wrote last month:

    After the 2000 season, when he was a free agent and the baseball world was opening up to him like the dawning of a new era, the Mariners offered Alex Rodriguez their kingdom.

    Ken Griffey Jr. was gone to Cincinnati. Randy Johnson had been traded to Houston and eventually was on his way to Arizona.

    The Mariners were going to belong to A-Rod.

    The team’s CEO, Howard Lincoln, put together golf dates for Rodriguez with the movers and shakers of the Northwest. He wooed A-Rod like a desperate college basketball coach.

    And, publicly at least, the love was requited.

    Toward the end of his last season in Seattle, Rodriguez was telling everyone how much he loved Seattle. He was saying he wanted to stay. He said he thought he could be part of a pennant contender for years to come.

    He said he wanted to be like his hero, Cal Ripken Jr., and spend his entire career with one team.

    In truth, Rodriguez didn’t know what he wanted when he was in Seattle. Sure, he wanted to play for a winner. He wanted to be recognized as one of the best players in the game. And he wanted to be loved.

    But he told everybody exactly what he thought they wanted to hear. And his Seattle teammates watched and rolled their eyes.

    Maybe Rodriguez was on his way to being the next big thing, but he never would be the next real thing.

    His personality was as fake as a beauty contestant’s. He always was the most disingenuous man in the room. And nobody spots a fake quicker than a teammate.

    And, I think back to something Scott Boras said back in December of 2003:

    Said Scott Boras, who represents Rodriguez: “Tom Hicks has indicated he will not consider a trade [involving Rodriguez] in the immediate future. I take that to mean Alex will be back with the Rangers next season.

    So, when digesting all this, I suggest that you expect nothing, but, be prepared for anything. To quote Cardinal Andújar: “There is one word in baseball that says it all, and that one word is ‘you-never-know’.”

    Comments on Boras: A-Rod Will Be In The Bronx In 2007

    1. Raf
      October 25th, 2006 | 11:44 am

      As I’ve said elsewhere, I’ll believe it when I see Rodriguez @ 3b Opening Day 2007.

    2. jonm
      October 25th, 2006 | 11:50 am

      That Steve Kelley column reads like a parody of a hack sports writer’s column. I don’t say this lightly, but that column is worse than the worst Mike Lupica column that I’ve ever read.

      Living in Seattle, he should know a little more about what made the 2001 Mariners a great team. Reading Steve Goldman’s Pinstriped Bible this week would be a good start for Kelley.

      For those who agree with Kelley, how exactly should ARod act? Trying to act like a “good teammate” would itself just be more supposed phoniness. If I were ARod, I would start acting like Barry Bonds. Then, at least he would be giving the press and his teammates a personality that deserves to be hated.

      It really has gotten to the point now at which it would be wise for ARod not to talk to the press at all.

    3. MJ
      October 25th, 2006 | 11:52 am

      Naturally. Boras doesn’t want to give the impression that ARod wants out and the Yanks don’t want to give the impression that they’re dying to get rid of him. Both sides want to make it seem like it’s a perfect marriage that will only break apart if a) the Yanks get exactly what they’re looking for in a trade and b) ARod gets moved to a place of his liking (meaning Chicago, Anaheim, etc. and not KC/Tampa/Milwaukee, etc.).

      My hope is that he’s traded to the AL Central where he’ll face good pitching more often than not and someone else can enjoy the 140 K seasons at 90 MPH fastballs above the belt.

    4. jonm
      October 25th, 2006 | 12:02 pm

      My hope is that he’s traded to the AL Central where he’ll face good pitching more often than not and someone else can enjoy the 140 K seasons at 90 MPH fastballs above the belt.
      ——————————————-

      Oh yeah, MJ. What the Yankees should do, in fact, is pick up say $12 million a year of ARod’s contract, ask for a Mike Timlin in return, and trade him to the Red Sox so that they can enjoy those 140 Ks per year. Hell, ARod quantitatively hurts any team on which he plays.

    5. MJ
      October 25th, 2006 | 12:09 pm

      Now, jonm, I never said that. Hyperbole and sarcasm might be the way you prefer to communicate and that’s fine. I’m merely expressing my frustration with Rodriguez and I’m not saying that the Yankees should trade him along with $16M cash for a year’s supply of bubblegum and sunflower seeds.

      You’ve made it abundantly clear that you want him around and that all the stats show him to be a wonderful player. Great. Enjoy your stats and have a good time in Cooperstown in 2017 or whenever he makes it into the Hall wearing whatever hat it’ll be at that time. I’ll continue watching the games when he whiffs at anything close to the plate and continues to frustrate the rest of us who are so sick of hearing about him.

    6. baileywalk
      October 25th, 2006 | 12:15 pm

      Chill out, jonm. That’s not what he’s saying. Even if A-Rod got every single RBI when the game was over (impossible) he still drove in 120. He still hit his 30-plus home runs. He is a GOOD, GREAT, FANTASTIC player. You cannot dispute this.

      But, boy, is he FRUSTRATING to watch, jon. I know exactly what MJ is talking about. His extremely long swing makes it impossible for him to hit anything in and up and every pitcher went there and he would swing and miss. I saw him swing and miss on a high SLIDER. We’re talking about whiffing on something that was high and 88 miles an hour. I couldn’t believe my eyes.

      Despite the good numbers, last year felt like a disaster for A-Rod. He went through stretches were it was almost painful and embarrassing watching him strike out again and again. And now he seems totally incapable of getting a hit in the playoffs. I wonder what A-Rod supporters would do if they didn’t have that Twins series in ’04 to hang their hats on.

      A-Rod, in my mind, is trade bait. Nothing else. Yankees need pitching and the only movable part on this team (well, a movable part they can handle dealing) is A-Rod. So Cashman should see what kind of deals are out there and if one brings back a couple of stud pitchers, he should pull the trigger.

      Here’s the REALLY funny scenario, though: Cashman works out a deal with the Angels for Nick Adenhart, Wood and Shields/Mendonza/Santana and A-Rod says NO and kills the deal. Then Yankee fans will really hate him. If the Yanks put together a good deal, A-Rod better take it — or things will get truly ugly.

    7. October 25th, 2006 | 12:24 pm

      I can’t help but wonder if, when he’s done, A-Rod’s back of his bubble-gum card is going to look like Robbie ALomar’s – with a lot of teams, most for only about three years each.

    8. Raf
      October 25th, 2006 | 12:25 pm

      I wonder what A-Rod supporters would do if they didn’t have that Twins series in ’04 to hang their hats on.
      ============
      They’d hang their hats on his 2 MVP’s, and the rest of his career numbers? Or the fact that in his postseason career he batted .280-.362-.485?

    9. jonm
      October 25th, 2006 | 12:25 pm

      Sorry about the sarcasm, MJ. I’m as frustrated as anyone with this Yankee team, but I know that all of the blame can’t be placed on ARod. I’m sick of hearing about him too, but I blame the press for that.

      Steve Goldman puts it best, if harshly, here:
      http://tinyurl.com/ubrhb
      If ARod weren’t here, who would be the fall guy for the team? I suppose that it would be Giambi or Johnson. No matter — creating fall guys leads to bad analysis and then bad trades.

      If the Yankees could get optimal value back for ARod, I’d be in favor of a trade. I don’t think that they can get optimal value for him. Therefore, all things considered I’m against them trading him.

    10. Raf
      October 25th, 2006 | 12:29 pm

      I can’t help but wonder if, when he’s done, A-Rod’s back of his bubble-gum card is going to look like Robbie ALomar’s – with a lot of teams, most for only about three years each.
      ==========
      Probably look more like Gary Sheffield’s card :). Could be worse, he could be Mike Morgan, or Todd Zeile :D

      Will all that’s going on, I wouldn’t mind a Jack McDowell moment from Rodriguez.

    11. Joel
      October 25th, 2006 | 12:32 pm

      Bringing A-Rod to the Yankees was Cashman’s doing. He is not going to get rid of him now. Cashman well knows that it would be a huge embarassment for the Yankees if A-Rod were traded and then went for 50 homers and 150 RBI. And A-Rod and Boras know that it will forever be knock on A-Rod’s historic career if he leaves NY as a failure.

      A-Rod is staying guys. We all need to root for him to have that signature post-season performance so he (and the Yanks) can get past this.

    12. baileywalk
      October 25th, 2006 | 12:35 pm

      They’d hang their hats on his 2 MVP’s, and the rest of his career numbers? Or the fact that in his postseason career he batted .280-.362-.485?

    13. BPIB
      October 25th, 2006 | 12:40 pm

      It’s a shame the Yankees and their fans have to resort to scapegoating. Baseball will ALWAYS be a team sport. I wonder what will happen next year when and if the Yanks make the playoffs and they do their same folding routine who will be to blame with A-rod gone.

    14. MJ
      October 25th, 2006 | 12:43 pm

      Sorry about the sarcasm, MJ.
      ===================================
      No harm, no foul, jonm.

      Joel: I still don’t get how the Yanks would face any humiliation by trading ARod. It wasn’t a mistake to bring the then-best player in the game to NYC at the cost of a free-swinging kid with limited defensive abilities who K’d his way through the 2003 ALCS and WS. The Yanks made a great trade that just hasn’t worked as well as everyone had expected. Further, I don’t think there’s any doubt that ARod will go hit his .300-50-150 elsewhere. It’s just that none of this should be humiliating to anyone. It isn’t working here. The Yanks can trade him, get pitching back, and move on. ARod can accept a trade, get back to being in a city that doesn’t make him mess his pants 24/7, and move on. Everyone wins.

    15. Jason O.
      October 25th, 2006 | 1:08 pm

      MJ, your neat and clean scenario sits well with everyone but Cashman. I believe that Cashman will never trigger a deal where NYY receives quantifiably less value in return for Alex just to “move on.”

      The Yankees are a eminently professional organization…I would be shocked if Torre, Jeter and Cashman can not craft an approach to assist Alex to increase his offensive production by 20% next season.

      Alex desperately wants to succeed in the Bronx. With his talent, how could the organization not pull out all the stops to this end?

    16. Raf
      October 25th, 2006 | 1:15 pm

      Sorry, Raf, let me be more specific. What would YANKEE-FAN A-Rod supporters hang their hats on if not for the Twins series in ’04, WHICH THEY TALK ABOUT AS PROVING HE CAN HIT IN THE POST-SEASON FOR THE YANKEES.
      ==================
      Oh. Chances are they’d point to

      2004: .286 .375 .512
      2005: .321 .421 .610
      2006: .290 .392 .523

      And the MVP in 2005.

      I’m not too concerned with a couple of weeks worth of AB’s in the postseason. He slumped in the postseason,(.241-.247-.494, 79 AB) BFD. So did the rest of the team. Baseball isn’t a sport where one dominant player can change a game. Bonds was for all intents and purposes neutralized in 2002, and the series still went 7 games. I mean look at the current postseason. Yadier Molina? So Taguchi? Endy Chavez?

      Anyway, the point is that all the reasons ARod supposedly can’t play in NY have been addressed. If he can’t hit in the postseason, then what happened in the MN series? What happened in the Boston series? If he can’t hit in NY, well, he won a MVP here. He had a better season in ’06 than he did in ’04. So what’s the problem?

    17. jonm
      October 25th, 2006 | 1:16 pm

      This is loopy, I admit. But I think that ARod is really the victim of having had too much bad therapy. He speaks to a therapist every day and his wife is trained in psychology; in effect, he lives life in a 24-hour therapy session (ugh!). He seems to have forgotten that anger can be legitimate at times. The way that ARod lives may be a good way to live and provide a good environment for children, but it’s not a good way to live when you have to deal with the New York sports media (it could be worse — he could be in Boston or Philadelphia).

      ARod knows that it was a year from hell for him. Basically, he can change, pull a McDowell, fire his therapist, and tell his wife to back off, OR he could be traded to a SoCal team (where he would fit right in). I would prefer the former route. Either alternative would probably be better for him than continuing on with the same way of coping with stress.

    18. Raf
      October 25th, 2006 | 1:19 pm

      Cashman well knows that it would be a huge embarassment for the Yankees if A-Rod were traded and then went for 50 homers and 150 RBI. And A-Rod and Boras know that it will forever be knock on A-Rod’s historic career if he leaves NY as a failure.
      =============
      Why would it be an embarrassment?

      And WRT ARod & Boras, can it get any worse? Despite the numbers he put up, over the past 3 seasons, people are saying he can’t hit in NY. Depsite all the attention put on him this year, he put up a .293-.392-.523 line.

    19. MJ
      October 25th, 2006 | 1:23 pm

      I would be shocked if Torre, Jeter and Cashman can not craft an approach to assist Alex to increase his offensive production by 20% next season.
      ====================================

      Honestly, what more can they do? This isn’t about them, this is about him. He either needs to stop pooping his pants or leave NYC.

    20. Raf
      October 25th, 2006 | 1:32 pm

      I would be shocked if Torre, Jeter and Cashman can not craft an approach to assist Alex to increase his offensive production by 20% next season.
      ========
      That’d be a hell of a season, if he increased his output by 20% :D

    21. baileywalk
      October 25th, 2006 | 2:01 pm

      Oh. Chances are they’d point to

      2004: .286 .375 .512
      2005: .321 .421 .610
      2006: .290 .392 .523

      And the MVP in 2005.

      I’m not too concerned with a couple of weeks worth of AB’s in the postseason. He slumped in the postseason,(.241-.247-.494, 79 AB) BFD. So did the rest of the team. Baseball isn’t a sport where one dominant player can change a game. Bonds was for all intents and purposes neutralized in 2002, and the series still went 7 games. I mean look at the current postseason. Yadier Molina? So Taguchi? Endy Chavez?
      —————-

      Maybe I’m talking in another language and it’s not coming through. I’m talking strictly about the playoffs.

      You can cite all the regular-season stats you want. But what about the playoffs? What has happened the last two years? Yeah, “a handful of ABs,” but is there anyone else on the team who has done as poorly as A-Rod? There’s “not doing well” in the playoffs, and looking like utter crap. There’s “slumping a bit during the playoffs” and “your manager batting you eighth.” A-Rod is in the latter category.

      A-Rod did himself a solid by turning it on in the last month of the year (when the Sox were dead). He made his numbers nice and repeatable. 121 RBIs! 35 home runs! Whatever — if you watched him every day like I did (and I’m sure you did) then you know he did not have a good year. He struggled as much as he ever has in his career. Including in the field.

      But if you want him around, fine, I’m not going to convince you otherwise. His stats are such that certain people don’t want to look beyond them. That’s fine with me. Just don’t complain next year when we’re about to blow a game open and he hits into a double play or swings right through 89-mile-an-hour “heat.”

      (Was Bonds really “neutralized” with his four home runs and six RBI in the ’02 WS? I wish A-Rod would be so “neutralized.” Bringing up Bonds in ’02 isn’t a good argument to make about “one dominant player not being able to change a game” — since he carried that offense in the postseason. He had 16 RBI — and they walked him 27 times.)

    22. baileywalk
      October 25th, 2006 | 2:05 pm

      Something I forgot to mention:

      In September A-Rod hit 8 home runs (tying the most he had hit in any month) and drove in 25 runs (second only to May). He hit .358, slugged .691, and had an on-base of .465.

      Those are by far the best numbers he had in each of those categories all year. He also only K’d 14 times — his lowest total since the first month of the season (when he K’d 20 times).

      Make of it what you will.

    23. Raf
      October 25th, 2006 | 3:35 pm

      1778 AB > 79 AB; it’s really that simple.

      If you want to rate a player on what he does in the playoffs, fine. I’m sure that’s the reason we have or had Wright, Pavano, and Womack, among others, on the roster at one time or another. You don’t get players based on what they can do in the playoffs, you get players based on what they can do during the regular season.

      Given the options out there, I’d rather keep Rodriguez. If the Yanks can move him for some decent pitching, and have an option for 3b, go for it. If they can move ANYONE for some decent pitching, and they have an option to fill the open position, go for it. But to move a player the caliber of Rodriguez because he “played like crap” over 79 AB, over a handful of games is ridiculous. Especially when you consider that the more games a player plays in the postseason, the closer he will get to his career numbers.

    24. October 25th, 2006 | 3:39 pm

      Why is when a guy is great in the post-season, he’s just great in the post-season – whereas when a guy sucks in the post-season it’s always because there’s a small sample size?

    25. Raf
      October 25th, 2006 | 3:43 pm

      (Was Bonds really “neutralized” with his four home runs and six RBI in the ’02 WS? I wish A-Rod would be so “neutralized.” Bringing up Bonds in ’02 isn’t a good argument to make about “one dominant player not being able to change a game” — since he carried that offense in the postseason. He had 16 RBI — and they walked him 27 times.)
      =======
      And guess what? The Giants still lost.

      Looks like I was wrong about Bonds being neutralized. Guess because I didn’t remember much outside of that blast he hit off Percival, I blocked out the rest of his performance?

    26. Raf
      October 25th, 2006 | 3:52 pm

      Why is when a guy is great in the post-season, he’s just great in the post-season – whereas when a guy sucks in the post-season it’s always because there’s a small sample size?
      ======================
      Media hype. Same reason why people can’t seem to believe that the other team won as opposed to their team losing.

      If a guy was so great in the postseason, you’d think that he’d be able to elevate his game during the regular season. During the ’98 WS, Ricky Ledee hit .600, you going to tell me that over the course of the rest of his career, he forgot how to hit?

      If the championship Yanks “knew what it takes” to win, they’d never lose a game in the postseason, hell, they’d never lose a game in the regular season either. Because they know “what it takes to win.”

      Given the length of a season, you’re going to find times when hitters/pitchers get hot/cold. Times where teams are going to go any combination of wins and losses equalling 7, or in the case of the division series, 5.

    27. SteveB
      October 25th, 2006 | 4:42 pm

      All I know is I’m glad that it’s Brian Cashman who will decide A-Rod’s fate and not a bunch of nervous nellie’s on a friggin ‘blog.’

    28. October 25th, 2006 | 6:13 pm

      I would be shocked if Torre, Jeter and Cashman can not craft an approach to assist Alex to increase his offensive production by 20% next season.
      ———————-
      they’ve tried every psychological thing they could this year. the only thing they might do is have him drop 10-20 lbs. to get back his quick swing. look at him in his seattle days. he looks like a stick compared to 2006.

      but more specifically, c’mon raf. how many games did you watch this year? i watched about 150 or so. i saw Arod struggle again and again in rbi sits. it seemed like constantly k’ed on 3 pitches. and then whiffed on 88 mph fastballs! what?! how does a great player do that? i understand once in a while, but it felt every game (during stretches). he guesses SO often. a guy with his talent shouldn’t be guessing so much. perhaps that points to his doubt/apprehension.

      he was also the worst on the team in getting the runner in from 3rd <2 outs. how does a great player do that? if he had even been average, he’d have 130+ rbi. melky was better, posada was better, sheff & matsui were better. you’ve got to have better production from your CLEANUP hitter (and the highest paid guy in MLB).

      remember that white sox game in August? my father-in-law (a huge fan) said he would never blame one guy for a team’s loss, but that game was the closest he’d ever seen. Arod failed on 2 opps. with a runner on 3 <2 outs, and hit into a GDP. the yanks lost by 1 run (i believe). of course, he wasn’t that bad in every game, but that’s a microcosm of his season/tenure with the yanks.

      and if you’re willing to say Arod is ‘not unclutch’ in the playoffs (bc it’s a small sample), are you willing to say Jeter or Ortiz are ‘not clutch’ bc it’s a small sample too? maybe there’s no such thing as ‘clutch,’ maybe it’s just performing at normal levels during an big game(s), but there’s definitely a thing called ‘unclutch,’ performing below normal levels during a big game(s).

      if BC can acquire good young pitchers/players, make the trade. he’s a HUGE distraction, making a ton of $, and as Steve pointed out in a previous column: his ‘clutch’ numbers have declined each year in NY.

      any way to bring Miggy Cabrera here?

    29. October 25th, 2006 | 6:24 pm

      oh, and the idea that trading Arod would be ‘embarrassing’ is wrong. look who were highly touted guys that were traded: Contreras, Vazquez, Weaver. All were expected to do good to great in NY but didn’t. BC sucked it up and traded them. Life goes on…

    30. Raf
      October 25th, 2006 | 7:25 pm

      ah, screw it…

      ARod is a terrible player, who can’t play in NY. Bring back Aaron Boone! Scott Brosius! Let’s see if we can get Soriano to play 3b. The Yanks haven’t been to the series since he left. Maybe get him to play 2b, and let Cano play 3b?

      Who needs statistics? Yadier Molina and So Taguchi hit big HR’s, let’s see if we can trade for them! Especially if the Cardinals win

      Looks like Contreras, Rogers, and Weaver know how to pitch and win, let’s see if we can get them back to pitch the Yanks to #27. Since Stottlemyre isn’t around to poison them, they should be fine.

      Mystique and Aura in 2007! Who needs starting pitching?

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