• 2006 Win Shares Above Bench

    Posted by on January 25th, 2007 · Comments (7)

    Dave Studeman at the The Hardball Times last week detailed a new stat called Win Shares Above Bench, or Baseline – aka “WSAB.”

    This is a refined approach to Win Shares, in which each player’s total Win Shares are compared to the Win Shares an average bench player would have received, given that player’s time at bat, on the mound or in the field.

    When you look at the 2006 Yankees, in terms of WSAB, you find this:

    2006WSAB.jpg

    Notice what happens when you use WSAB rather than total Win Shares.

    The distance in the totals between A-Rod and Jeter stay the same. But, Posada and Giambi move closer to Jeter – instead of being 9 or 10 behind (in WS) they’re now 6 behind (in WSAB). And, Mike Mussina moves from 18 behind (in WS) to 10 behind (in WSAB).

    This does not mean that Derek Jeter was not very valuable to the Yankees in 2006. It’s just interesting that WSAB allows guys like Posada, Giambi, and Mussina to close the gap from Jeter whereas it does not for Alex Rodriguez.

    Comments on 2006 Win Shares Above Bench

    1. baileywalk
      January 25th, 2007 | 1:15 pm

      Why are Mo’s, Cano’s and Proctor’s WSAB numbers so low?

    2. jonm
      January 25th, 2007 | 1:25 pm

      ~~It’s just interesting that WSAB allows guys like Posada, Giambi, and Mussina to close the gap from Jeter whereas it does not for Alex Rodriguez.~~

      That’s not surprising. The reason that the gap narrowed more for those guys and not Rodriguez is that Rodriguez had more playing time, at-bat and in the field (more chances to earn win shares).

      Overall, that’s probably a dead-on ranking of Yankee players last year. Win shares even has a clutch component. The list certainly makes clear how disappointing Johnson was last year. We should have spent much more time complaining about him than Rodriguez.

      I would probably move Posada into second place by himself over Giambi.

    3. January 25th, 2007 | 3:28 pm

      ~~~Why are Mo’s, Cano’s and Proctor’s WSAB numbers so low?~~~

      I’m afraid to hear the correct answer to that.

    4. January 25th, 2007 | 3:30 pm

      ~~We should have spent much more time complaining about him than Rodriguez.~~

      Many of us did. Too bad so many people have a negative opinion of A-Rod and don’t listen to reason when it comes to Alex.

      Does this control for position? Derek was more valuable because he plays short whereas Alex loses points because he’s a third or not?

    5. January 25th, 2007 | 3:31 pm

      ~~~The reason that the gap narrowed more for those guys and not Rodriguez is that Rodriguez had more playing time, at-bat and in the field (more chances to earn win shares).~~~

      Explain the WS and WSAB marks for Bernie and Godzilla then…

    6. January 26th, 2007 | 8:02 am

      Explain the WS and WSAB marks for Bernie and Godzilla then…

      The reason is exactly what JonM said. WSAB takes a baseline away from a player’s WS total, based on how much he played, using at bats, innings in the field and innings pitched.

      Williams is “low” because his baseline is seven, based on the amount of time he played. 8 minus 7 is one.

      Jeter, ARod and Damon played the most, so their baseline is more like 12 or 13. The system doesn’t “control” for position, so Jeter gets full credit for playing shortstop. That is, every player is judged against the same fielding baseline, regardless of where he played.

      However, it helps Giambi. He DH’d a lot, so he didn’t log as many innings in the field (so his baseline is lower).

      Starting pitchers are given a lower relative baseline than other players. I’ve posted a lot on this system at The Hardball Times, Baseball Graphs and in this year’s (and last year’s) THT Annual.

    7. January 26th, 2007 | 10:08 am

      Thanks Dave!

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