• Chase Wright & Erik Bedard

    Posted by on April 17th, 2007 · Comments (12)

    Two days ago, I suggested that the Yankees Chase Wright could be considered as an “Erik Bedard” type pitcher. The feedback to that suggestion was interesting. Many did not agree with my suggestion. Therefore, in an effort to try and explain how it was derived, I worked up the following chart:

    WrightComp.jpg

    I think the issue for some here is that Bedard was one of the twenty best pitchers in the league last season – and that’s what they’re using in their mind when they think of Bedard.

    But, that’s not what I’m saying about Wright. He will not be one of the twenty best pitchers in the league this season. Most likely, Wright will return to the minors this year – like Bedard did after 2002. More so, what I am suggesting is that Wright could be back in the majors in a year or two – and be a useful pitcher…and, maybe, some time around 2010, he could have a very good season in the bigs (like Bedard last year).

    If a pitcher like Erik Bedard can make it in the majors, there’s no reason why a pitcher like Chase Wright cannot as well – in due time.

    Comments on Chase Wright & Erik Bedard

    1. April 17th, 2007 | 11:24 am

      Nitpick:
      Once again, I don’t know where the curveball sentiment comes from. The scouting report I read on it states that he can’t find a consistent arm slot. If true, major leaguers are going to murder it.

      Bedard throws 90-92 (via Scouts, Inc.), Wright is at 88-90 (via Baseball America).

      Bedard was also a college pitcher, and he underwent Tommy John surgery in 2002.

    2. Raf
      April 17th, 2007 | 11:37 am

      If a pitcher like Erik Bedard can make it in the majors, there’s no reason why a pitcher like Chase Wright cannot as well – in due time.
      ———–
      Yet, more often than not it happens. There have been a variety of pitchers that have succeded, there have been a variety of pitchers that have failed.

    3. Raf
      April 17th, 2007 | 11:41 am

      Of course I say this hoping that Chase Wright has a long and productive ML career.

    4. brockdc
      April 17th, 2007 | 1:20 pm

      “If a pitcher like Erik Bedard can make it in the majors, there’s no reason why a pitcher like Chase Wright cannot as well – in due time.”

      Well, I think a lot is also contingent upon Wright’s control, as well as the movement on his pitches. A straight 88 mph fastball with no movement is going to get crushed.

    5. April 17th, 2007 | 1:46 pm

      Location is the key. Zito throws in the 80′s and gets by with location and a good curve.

    6. April 17th, 2007 | 2:01 pm

      Barry Zito has “gotten by” on one good season and a reputation. Before yesterday, he had been terrible this season.

    7. April 17th, 2007 | 2:34 pm

      Zito just rep? The stats disagree:

      2000-2006 RSAA
      AL Leaders

      1 Pedro Martinez 229
      2 Johan Santana 169
      3 Tim Hudson 147
      4 Barry Zito 146
      5 Roy Halladay 143
      6 Mariano Rivera 137
      7 Mark Buehrle 131
      8 Mike Mussina 103
      9 Keith Foulke 98
      10 Scot Shields 83

    8. Garcia
      April 17th, 2007 | 2:42 pm

      Holy shit….Scot Shields on that list, I can’t believe he’s in the Top 10 in the AL.

    9. April 17th, 2007 | 4:16 pm

      For context purposes, Steve:

      Are these just their AL numbers? For instance, Is Pedro’s 229 RSAA just for 2000 through 2004? Or does it count his 2005 and 2006 with the Mets as well? Same goes for Hudson.

    10. April 17th, 2007 | 4:16 pm

      How about running the same RSAA report without 2003? I’d love to see where Zito falls at that point. Additionally, RSAA doesn’t account for the fact that Zito played half his games in a giants pitchers park. I still maintain that he had one good season and developed a reputation because of that.

    11. April 17th, 2007 | 6:07 pm

      AL only, those were. And, RSAA is park adjusted.

    12. April 17th, 2007 | 6:33 pm

      “Runs Saved Above Average. This stat, which is also tracked and reported by Lee Sinins, is a measure of a pitcher’s effectiveness and contribution. The formula is RA/IP minus league-average RA/IP, times total innings pitched.”

      I see nothing in there about park adjustment.

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