• Robinson Cano & Jorge Orta

    Posted by on May 11th, 2007 · Comments (6)

    Robinson Cano is a left-handed batting second baseman. When he played, Jorge Orta was a left-handed batting second baseman.

    Robinson Cano played his first full big league season at age 22 and had -5 Runs Created Above Average as a batter. Jorge Orta played his first full big league season at age 22 and had -5 Runs Created Above Average as a batter.

    In his second full big league season, Robinson Cano, then age 23, had 21 Runs Created Above Average as a batter (to go along with an OWP of .627 and an OPS+ of 132). In his second full big league season, Jorge Orta, then age 23, had 24 Runs Created Above Average as a batter (to go along with an OWP of .646 and an OPS+ of 130).

    Let’s review: Age 22 – both had -5 RCAA. Age 23 – their RCAA/OWP/OPS+ marks were very near each other. This is interesting.

    Is Robinson Cano the next Jorge (Made To) Orta? Well, there is a difference here. During Orta’s first two full seasons, Jorge drew 10 BB less than a league average batter would have drawn. However, during Cano’s first two full seasons, Robbie drew 52 BB less than a league average batter would have drawn. Clearly, Cano is much more of a believer in “Thou Shalt Not Pass.”

    For what it’s worth, Jorge Orta, by the time he was 25-years old, was pretty much just a league-average batter. And, Orta was eventually moved off second base by the time he was 28-years old. For someone who looked pretty good as a 23-year old, his career (albeit sort of long) was not extremely impressive.

    This is not to say that Robinson Cano is on the same path as Jorge Orta. More so, it’s just an observation that Cano and Orta started out of the gate somewhat in the same manner…and they both batted the same way and played the same position.

    Hey, for all we know, Robinson Cano might not even turn out as good as Jorge Orta? Cano’s inability to master the strike zone just may do him in as a batter. Then again, I probably said that about Alfonso Soriano from 2002 to 2003, as well. So, what do I know?

    Comments on Robinson Cano & Jorge Orta

    1. Garcia
      May 11th, 2007 | 4:54 pm

      I’m a huge fan of Cano, but I have been getting more and more frustrated with him and his strike zone discipline, or lack thereof. I went and looked at Jorge Orta and he had nice major league career – after the age of 29 he wasn’t useful.

      I don’t know what to say about Cano, I am starting to lose faith in him. The pitches he swings at are awful, he doesn’t look as if he has a clue. If Cano turns into Orta then I guess things could have been worse. However, it doesn’t look like he’s heading in the stardom direction that many thought, myself included.

      I hope he turns it around. Let’s go Yanks!!!! .500 or bust!!!!

    2. Don
      May 11th, 2007 | 5:05 pm

      Both posts basically say it all. It is painful to watch Cano this season. He has of now regressed. Why throw him strikes when he will swing at any garbage and get himself out.

    3. Lee Sinins
      May 11th, 2007 | 5:10 pm

      I’ve been expecting big things from Cano and, unfortunately, I am now more certain than before that I will be correct.

      By big things, I mean big numbers in the negative RCAA department.

      If Cano turns into Orta, then he would greatly exceed my expectations for him. Orta’s 55 career RCAA are 155 more than I give Cano’s BEST CASE scenario for his career.

    4. baileywalk
      May 12th, 2007 | 1:12 am

      It’s such a joy to see fans stick by their players.

    5. jonm
      May 12th, 2007 | 9:30 am

      ~~career (albeit sort of long) was not extremely impressive.~~

      Okay, the subtext of this message is to take a swipe at Cano, by comparing him to a player like Jorge Orta, who has fallen into obscurity.

      Your approach sometimes lacks proper context. Orta’s career has to be considered very impressive. Orta played 16 years, had over 1600 hits, and, in a pitcher’s era had a lifetime batting average of .278. Orta almost certainly has to rank within the top 800 non-pitchers of all-time. Bill James has him as the 87th best 2B of all-time and that rating is hurt because of Orta’s weak defense.

      Sure, I’d be disappointed if Cano turns out to be only as good as Orta, but still that’s no swipe at Orta who was a very good major league baseball player.

    6. May 12th, 2007 | 10:24 am

      ~~~Orta who was a very good major league baseball player.~~~

      But, was he as good as many thought he would be…following his age 23 season? That’s my point here.

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