• Joba Moved To Pen For ‘Look See’

    Posted by on July 30th, 2007 · Comments (9)

    From Newsday -

    The Yankees may or may not be able to bolster their bullpen with a trade for the Rangers’ Eric Gagne before tomorrow’s 4 p.m. non-waiver trade deadline. Either way, they have moved a step closer to filling a bullpen spot with Joba Chamberlain, as they plan to try the 21-year-old righthander in relief for Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.

    “He’s going to pitch an inning out of the bullpen [tonight],” senior vice president of baseball operations Mark Newman said last night. “We’re just going to try it and see what it looks like.”

    If the Yankees like what they see from Chamberlain, they could be less inclined to trade for Gagne. Either way, they likely need someone to fill a hole in front of Mariano Rivera.

    Ryan Bradley. First-rounder signed in 1997. In 1998, he was rushed from Single-A, to Double-A, to Triple-A, and then to the majors to work in the Yankees pen. After five games in the majors, he was toast. Four years later, at the age of 26, he was out of baseball.

    That was all under Cashman’s watch. I guess he learned nothing from it – as they’re doing it again here with Chamberlain.

    Comments on Joba Moved To Pen For ‘Look See’

    1. baileywalk
      July 30th, 2007 | 7:26 am

      You really dug deep into your hat for that one, Steve. 1998 seems like ten thousand years ago and I don’t remember Mr. Bradley.

      Was he nearly as well-regarded as Joba? Did he have this kind of stuff?

      Looking at his numbers (he was a part-time reliever in the minors) the obvious problem is that they never let him master AAA. And he never did. He was good in A-ball and dominated AA, but faltered in AAA. After 1998 he went back to AAA and failed again. So maybe Bradley just wasn’t very good. I don’t know. Do you recall what his stuff was like?

      I agree with you about Joba, though. Joba hasn’t thrown a lot of innings yet. I just don’t think it makes sense to irritate that arm. And I hate the idea of putting him in the hands of Torre. You have to fear him either sitting too long or being overused. You think Torre gives a damn that he’s a prized prospect? When the shit hit the fan, Torre cares only about his own ass (see: trying to blame A-Rod for the playoff collapse by batting him eighth).

      People keep comparing Joba to Papelbon, but there are differences:

      1) Papelbon was never as highly regarded as Joba. They talked about Papelbon as a three starter; Joba is an ace. So you’re losing a lot more if he gets hurt.

      2) Papelbon closed in college. He knows what it’s like to work out of the ‘pen.

      3) Papelbon spent half a season in the big leagues as a starter/reliever before being the full-time closer. He had a lot of more innings on that arm.

      And on the negative side, Papelbon blew out his shoulder and the team blamed the workload of relieving. If Joba in any way gets hurt, would it have been worth it?

      As noMaas pointed out, AAA has other alternatives. So why mess with an ace starting pitcher to fix a hole in the big-league bullpen unless you absolutely have to?

      The Yankees always make the panic move they said they wouldn’t.

      It should be cool to see Phil and Joba on the same team. I just hope they’re both around long term.

    2. redbug
      July 30th, 2007 | 8:32 am

      Guidry started out in the pen before he started games and obviously it did no harm to his arm. I don’t know whether he started or relieved in the minors.

    3. MJ
      July 30th, 2007 | 9:20 am

      To me, the most worrisome aspect of this is how differently they are treading Joba in light of Hughes’s development. Last year Hughes dominated AA-Trenton but they treated him with kid gloves and shut him down after 5 innings and ever even discussed promotions. Less than 12 months later, Chamberlain is being promoted every few weeks. Is there some reason why Joba’s been fast-tracked when Hughes was really treated with extreme caution.

      Most other teams have been able to use future ace starters out of the bullpen (Johan/Liriano in Minnesota; Andrew Miller in Detroit, Gallardo in Milwaukee) so I’m not worried about that. What worries me is that a) he’s being rushed up too quickly and b) that Torre will utterly destroy his careeer. What if Joba comes up here and flops? Will he get the Edwar treatment of being benched for 2 weeks? What if he comes up here and dominates? Will he get the Proctor/Sturtze treatment where he’s pitched every day for 2 weeks?

      Cashman’s an idiot if he doesn’t know Torre’s routine by now. But I guess both realize that they’re darn close to being fired so they don’t care what happens after 2007…

    4. Joel
      July 30th, 2007 | 9:45 am

      How about we just get Gagne and let this kid chill for another year. I mean–we’re the Yankees! I’m not interested in any experiments in the heart of a pennant race when there are bonafide guys out there who can be traded for.

    5. Raf
      July 30th, 2007 | 9:52 am

      I’m not interested in any experiments in the heart of a pennant race when there are bonafide guys out there who can be traded for.
      ==============
      They’ve got “bonafide guys” in their current bullpen… Everybody there has pitched in the heat and heart of a pennant race, as well as the postseason.

    6. baileywalk
      July 30th, 2007 | 9:55 am

      Is there some reason why Joba’s been fast-tracked when Hughes was really treated with extreme caution.

    7. JeremyM
      July 30th, 2007 | 9:56 am

      I think the difference between Phil and Joba is that Joba did pitch a few years in college and is thus a little bit older and physically mature than Hughes.

      I’m stunned by the development of Joba though, he was a good pitcher for Nebraska but he was never a shutdown ace for them (I’m from Nebraska). Shows how little I know about baseball.

    8. July 30th, 2007 | 11:09 am

      Bradley and Joba are so dissimilar this comparison isn’t really valid. They have different make ups, different levels of success. And as the future will show, different outcomes.

    9. July 30th, 2007 | 11:18 am

      ~~~Bradley and Joba are so dissimilar this comparison isn’t really valid. They have different make ups, different levels of success.~~~

      Gotta call you on this one Ben. How are their make-ups and success levels different?

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