• Gagne To Boston?

    Posted by on July 31st, 2007 · Comments (19)

    From Ken Rosenthal -

    The Red Sox are on the verge of winning the Eric Gagne sweepstakes, pending his approval and a review of his medical records, according to major-league sources.

    Gagne must waive his no-trade clause to Boston for the deal to be completed. It is possible the Red Sox will allow him to share the closer’s role with Jonathan Papelbon.

    The Rangers would receive right-hander Kason Gabbard and an additional player or players in the deal, sources say.

    Before reaching agreement with the Red Sox, the Rangers had discussed trading Gagne to the Mets, Yankees and Brewers. He could have been sent to each of those teams without his permission.

    Gagne could reject the deal because of his desire to remain a closer with the Rangers rather than share the role with Papelbon or become his setup man.

    The Red Sox also could attempt to persuade him to waive his no-trade protection by guaranteeing all or part of his remaining $3.65 million in potential bonuses for games finished.

    Co-closers. Good. That always works out so well.

    Comments on Gagne To Boston?

    1. Raf
      July 31st, 2007 | 2:50 pm

      Co-closers. Good. That always works out so well.
      ==================
      Maybe not always, but it does.

    2. July 31st, 2007 | 3:03 pm

      Raf – starting with Lyle/Gossage in 1978, teams have tried co-closers and it almost never works out. You can’t have two roosters in the same hen house.

    3. JJay
      July 31st, 2007 | 3:06 pm

      Screw co-closers:

      What about:

      Okajima in the 7th
      Gagne in the 8th
      Papelbon in the 9th

    4. July 31st, 2007 | 3:19 pm

      That’s if Gagne is willing to set-up. He’ll want more money to do that.

    5. Raf
      July 31st, 2007 | 3:20 pm

      Raf – starting with Lyle/Gossage in 1978, teams have tried co-closers and it almost never works out.
      ===========
      Even so, in ’78 Gossage was the closer, and Lyle was the setup man. That seemed to work fine; Gossage was the primary closer, Lyle would get a save here and there. I presume the Papelbon – Gagne arrangement would be similar, if not the same.

    6. JJay
      July 31st, 2007 | 3:22 pm

      More money? From what I understand the Sox have already agreed to pay his contract plus any and all incentives.

      And I was only referring to the remainder of this year and the playoffs. Not the future.

    7. baileywalk
      July 31st, 2007 | 3:25 pm

      I don’t buy the co-closer thing either. There’s no way they are asking Papelbon, one of the best closers in baseball, to “share” the closing duties. I think all this means is that Gagne will close when Papelbon is unavailable, and they’re calling him a “co-closer” to massage his ego.

      But if this deal goes through, it’s a great one for the Sox. If they get Gagne, I think the Sox will be tough to beat in the playoffs. They can shorten games for their starters to six innings. And Beckett and Matsuzaka can certainly give them six quality innings. Then you have the seventh, eighth and ninth wrapped up with Okajima, Gagne and Papelbon.

      The Red Sox should give Gagne whatever money he wants. What’s a few million dollars to them?

      Considering they had to give up little to get him, this will be a hell of a deal for Theo. It’s one of those deals that definitely calls for the cliche “it makes a good team better.”

    8. July 31st, 2007 | 3:51 pm

      ~~~Even so, in ’78 Gossage was the closer, and Lyle was the setup man. That seemed to work fine; Gossage was the primary closer, Lyle would get a save here and there.~~~

      I remember that 1978 season well. Lyle was pissed off all year because he didn’t close. It was not the ideal situation for the club – having the two of them on the roster at the same time.

    9. July 31st, 2007 | 3:53 pm

      ~~~From what I understand the Sox have already agreed to pay his contract plus any and all incentives.~~~

      If true, then I guess it’s no issue the Sox.

      Actually, it’s no issue to the issue to the Yankees either. They’re not going to catch Boston – it’s the Tigers and Indians they should be worried about this year.

    10. baileywalk
      July 31st, 2007 | 4:00 pm

      I remember that 1978 season well. Lyle was pissed off all year because he didn’t close. It was not the ideal situation for the club – having the two of them on the roster at the same time.
      —-

      I wasn’t alive at the time, so I obviously didn’t get to see the ’78 season. How did all of this go down? I know Lyle was pissed, but looking at the numbers, Lyle was merely okay (more hits than innings pitched, his ERA jumped a run), but Goose was a beast: only 87 hits in 134 IP, 2.01 ERA. So was it simply a situation where the Yankees saw who was better and handed him the closer’s role? Or did it not work from a logistical standpoint?

    11. JohnnyC
      July 31st, 2007 | 4:10 pm

      That was situation for which Nettles famously coined the phrase, “he went from Cy Young to Sayonara.” Lyle wasn’t happy and he was traded away in the off-season. It worked out well for the team only because, in those days, there really wasn’t much need for a “set-up” guy. A closer would routinely finish the game from whatever point he entered, be it the 7th, 8th, or 9th innings. What the Red Sox are doing adding Gagne speaks to proactively dealing with two potentially critical fears: Papelbon’s wearing down again and Okajima having already surpassed his career high in innings pitched with 2 more months to go.

    12. Raf
      July 31st, 2007 | 4:11 pm

      I remember that 1978 season well. Lyle was pissed off all year because he didn’t close. It was not the ideal situation for the club – having the two of them on the roster at the same time.
      ===========
      There were many situations in that clubhouse that weren’t ideal at the time.

      From the looks of it, Lyle still did his job in 1978. Also, when traded to the Rangers, it looks like he was co-closer there with Jim Kern and Danny Darwin (1979-80). Then he went to the Phils & White Sox (1980-82), not really doing anything of merit.

    13. July 31st, 2007 | 4:27 pm

      ~~~I wasn’t alive at the time, so I obviously didn’t get to see the ’78 season. How did all of this go down? ~~~

      I was 15 at the time, but, this is how I remember it.

      Lyle was coming off a CYA year – and he was maybe the MVP of the 1977 team, or darn close to it.

      Stein saw Goose on the FA market and went nuts for him. George also went out and got Rawly Eastwick who was closing for the Reds and Cards.

      It was pitched to Lyle that “Don’t worry, there’s plenty of work to go around, you’ll be used the same as before….”

      But, quickly, it became clear that Goose was the man and that Lyle and Eastwick were mop-up men. Eventually, Eastwick was sent packing.

      18 times that year, Lyle pitched on 3 days rest or more. 43 times that year, Gossage pitched on 2 days rest or less.

      Check out “The Bronx Zoo” on Amazon.com – click “Search inside this book ” and enter “Gossage.” It will show you how pissed Lyle was over this whole thing.

    14. Raf
      July 31st, 2007 | 4:34 pm

      Dotel to the Braves…

    15. Garcia
      July 31st, 2007 | 4:39 pm

      From the horses mouth, via Pete Abe:
      Scott Proctor said his good-byes. “I’m glad (Joe Torre) put me in as many games as he did,” he said. “I have nothing but respect for him.”

    16. bfriley76
      July 31st, 2007 | 4:44 pm

      According to Buster Olney, the Yankees could have had Gagne for Melky or Kennedy. I think price is a little too steep for two months of Gagne, even if it meant keeping him away from the Sox.

    17. baileywalk
      July 31st, 2007 | 5:32 pm

      According to Buster Olney, the Yankees could have had Gagne for Melky or Kennedy.
      —-

      This once again shows that teams ask for the moon from the Yankees, but give their players away to other teams. How do you compare Melky (a major-leaguer who’s a great outfielder and a steady bat) and Kennedy (a top prospect now in AAA) to a fourth-outfielder prospect who’s 25 and an average-fringe pitcher who’s also 25?

      It’s totally absurd.

    18. July 31st, 2007 | 5:42 pm

      i agree bailey. Kennedy could be starting for many ML teams right now, and Melky is the 2nd best CF in the AL (defensively). and they’re both under 23!

      the only thing that MIGHT swing the trade in Texas’ favor is how this beltre kid does. he’s supposedly a 5-tool guy who could turn into a real star. and that Gagne will be a FA following the year.

      but seeing as beltre’s just 17, it’s a win for Boston. Texas is probably pissed their still paying $7 mil a year for Arod. but that package should not get a bonafide closer.

    19. Don
      July 31st, 2007 | 6:14 pm

      Gabbard has some people comparing him to Jimmy Key. So he is an interesting pitcher.

      Re: Sparky Lyle. The saddest thing I ever saw was after winning the 1978 WS. Team is celebrating in the clubhouse and off by himself, drinking beer, was Sparky. He knew it was the end of his days as a Yankee.

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