• Now That Scott Proctor Is Gone…

    Posted by on July 31st, 2007 · Comments (20)

    …let’s look at some numbers.

    As you read this, try and remember that I’m a Scott Proctor fan. I love his tough guy attitude – heck, I’m the one who started calling him “Everyday Scottie Proctor” back in April 2006 – and that’s caught on with many Yankees fans since that time. I share this not as a dig on Proctor – more so, it’s just a statement of facts and stats.

    I think Proctor is toast this season.

    Back on June 26th, I wrote:

    Scott Proctor, from June 21st to June 23rd, threw 86 pitches (combined) in the three games where he appeared. That’s like a full game for a starter. So, what does Torre do in this game? He brings in Proctor – to pitch the 9th of a tie game – on “two days rest.” Would you have a starter come back on two-days rest after throwing 86 pitches? No. Scott Proctor should have never appeared in this game – or any game – until he had at least three or four days rest.

    And, worse, during the ninth, you could see that Proctor gassed. He was red in the face, sweating, etc. Once he allowed the first two batters to reach, he should have been lifted.

    What’s happened since that time? From June 26, 2007 to July 27, 2007, here are Proctor’s stats:

    14 Games, 13.3 IP, 18 H, 10 BB, 4 HR
    Opponents BA/OBA/SLG – .321 /.433/.589

    Yes, since Torre cooked Scottie from June 21st to June 26th, Proctor has been a batting practice pitcher. Before June 21st, Proctor pitched in 35 games this season and allowed an Opponents BA/OBA/SLG of .215/.310/.338 in 35.67 IP.

    Joe Torre roasted Scott over three days in June this year, then let him cool two days, and then went on to microwaved him again on the sixth day (to make sure he was well done). Now, you can stick a fork in Proctor.

    This is why Everyday Scottie leaving now will probably not be an issue for the Yankees this season. Torre made him useless.

    Take care Scott. And, best of luck next season – when you start to get some feeling back in your arm.

    Comments on Now That Scott Proctor Is Gone…

    1. MJ
      July 31st, 2007 | 1:24 pm

      None of what you wrote is untrue. But, given those facts, how can Cashman let Torre do the same to Joba/Edwar in good conscience? Of course, this assumes that Joba/Edwar will be in the circle of trust (if not by merit then by necessity). And if they’re not in the circle of trust, then that only means more of Farnsworth, Myers, and Villone, which doesn’t help matters either.

      It’s a perfect storm of Torre’s consistent misuse of relief pitchers and Cashman’s befuddling lack of comprehension of Torre’s m.o. after 10 years of working together. The two of them together are dangerous and not helping matters one bit.

    2. baileywalk
      July 31st, 2007 | 1:33 pm

      Steve, you don’t think a little rest and a decrease in workload would have gotten Proctor back to his norm? Proctor didn’t seem to comprehend the abuse on his arm — while he was away tending to his wife and child while the team was in KC, he threw a bullpen session.

      Vizcaino finally got some time off after being abused and his fastball came back.

      Maybe Proctor can recharge the batteries being away from Torre.

    3. July 31st, 2007 | 1:33 pm

      ~~~It’s a perfect storm of Torre’s consistent misuse of relief pitchers and Cashman’s befuddling lack of comprehension of Torre’s m.o. after 10 years of working together. The two of them together are dangerous and not helping matters one bit.~~~

      I would ditto that.

    4. baileywalk
      July 31st, 2007 | 1:40 pm

      Sorry if this is a little off the beaten path here, but… is anyone else as amused as I am how Peter Abraham toes the company line for the Yankees while trying so hard to act like he’s not? His take on Proctor was: he is what he is, a seventh-inning pitcher, and those guys are easy to come by in baseball. Really? There’s such a lack of good relief pitching that the Brewers gave up three prospects to get Scott Linebrink. How is it easy?

      Abraham touted Proctor as a future closer until the organization fell out of love with him. From that point, of course, he was a nothing-special, trade-him-if-you-can pitcher.

    5. July 31st, 2007 | 1:44 pm

      ~~~Steve, you don’t think a little rest and a decrease in workload would have gotten Proctor back to his norm?~~~

      It’s possible. But, that R&R was never going to happen under Torre’s watch.

    6. Don
      July 31st, 2007 | 1:59 pm

      So Proctor threw a lot of pitches? Big deal. He is a dime-a-dozen player. Baseball is full of RHP like him. And he was used so much in 2007 thanks to the April-May starting pitcher problems as well as Farnsworth and Bruney not performing at any reliable level. So? Thanks for the effort Scott, now move on guys, move on.

    7. MJ
      July 31st, 2007 | 2:07 pm

      is anyone else as amused as I am how Peter Abraham toes the company line for the Yankees while trying so hard to act like he’s not?
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Bailey, I’ve noticed the same thing. It’s why I no longer read Peter Abraham’s blog. He’s a blatant apologist for every single move Torre makes and rationalizes everything down to “well, the man HAS won over 2000 games in the big leagues…”

      It used to be a good read but now it’s gotten pretty dull and predictable. Further, the quality of the comments are piss-poor. For my money, the only big-time Yankee blogs worth reading are Steve’s, Belth’s, and the guys at Replacement Level.

    8. Garcia
      July 31st, 2007 | 2:13 pm

      I’d like to go on the record saying I’m a big fan of Pete Abe, he does a great job and offers some great insight. Plus it’s free.

      That said, I hardly think Torre cooked Proctor’s arm. Proctor loves to throw, he has even said this himself. If he doesn’t feel good then he can tell the bullpen coach and another arm will be ready for Torre to “burn” him, too.

      I can’t wait till Torre leaves already. It’s sick already the non stop shit the man takes.

    9. Raf
      July 31st, 2007 | 2:13 pm

      It’s a perfect storm of Torre’s consistent misuse of relief pitchers and Cashman’s befuddling lack of comprehension of Torre’s m.o. after 10 years of working together.
      ===================
      I think that may be overblown. I’ll try to do some research to back that up, but I think the list of pitchers Torre “ruined” is pretty short. Definately nothing showing consistency.

    10. MJ
      July 31st, 2007 | 2:34 pm

      Raf, it’s not just guys Torre’s “ruined”, it’s his general philosophy on how he deploys his relievers. Cashman is his enabler in this regard – calling guys up and not prodding his manager to distribute innings more evenly. After 10 years, I’d think Cashman would’ve noticed that Torre plays favorites out there (Proctor, Sturtze, Villone) and lets others languish (Edwar, most recently) without even a look.

    11. christopher
      July 31st, 2007 | 2:44 pm

      ~~I think that may be overblown.~~

      Absolutely. The only names that people come up with as evidence are Sturtze and Karsay. Sometimes someone will throw in Mendoza too. Those are 3 guys who had 10+ yr careers. If that’s the definition of “ruined”, I think 90% of the pitchers in baseball would love to be ruined. Torre gets more out of mediocre, journeymen relief pitchers than any other manager in the league, yet this is somehow viewed as a negative. People kill Torre for using people too much or kill him for using people too little. It would be great if all 7 relievers could pitch 14.3% of the innings, but that’s not reality.

      The idea that Torre cooked Proctor is also interesting. The facts don’t support that argument. If Proctor was cooked after his Jun 22-26 outings, can anyone explain why he pitched 6 scoreless outings from July 1 to July 13th, while giving up only two hits? He actually has a 2.84 ERA in July. He’s been awful over the past 10 days or so, but it’s not from overwork. He had the All-Star break and a personal leave of absence during the time that he started sucking. If anything, the evidence points to Proctor being ineffective after being used too little, not too much. I don’t buy that Torre cooked him at the end of June, but then he pitched great in early July, only to feel the effects of the “cooking” in late July. It doesn’t make sense. We heard the same arguments last year. He was great at the start and then had a couple mediocre months. People said Torre killed him, but then he went on to finish strong including a 1.76 ERA in September.

      I get as frustrated at some of Torre’s bullpen decisions as others, but the idea that he ruins the careers of pitchers is inaccurate.

    12. MJ
      July 31st, 2007 | 2:54 pm

      He actually has a 2.84 ERA in July.
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Although that seems pretty solid, I’d rather know how many inherited runners he allowed to score or what his WHIP was in July and compare that to April-early June. I think I read somewhere that his OPS against was .939 in July. That’s kinda horrible, isn’t it?

    13. Raf
      July 31st, 2007 | 2:55 pm

      After 10 years, I’d think Cashman would’ve noticed that Torre plays favorites out there (Proctor, Sturtze, Villone) and lets others languish (Edwar, most recently) without even a look.
      ================
      I think that may be the case with all managers, not just Torre.

      Guess I’ll look into that instead.

    14. July 31st, 2007 | 3:10 pm

      ~~~The idea that Torre cooked Proctor is also interesting. The facts don’t support that argument. If Proctor was cooked after his Jun 22-26 outings, can anyone explain why he pitched 6 scoreless outings from July 1 to July 13th, while giving up only two hits? ~~~

      It was two hits – with 4 BB – in 6.2 IP.

      The walks there are a concern, no?

      Also, look at those 6 games that he pitched from 7/1 to 7/13. Four of the 6 were major “just throw the ball over” blow-out type scores. In the two games that were close, 7/5 and 7/13, Proctor allowed 3 of those 4 walks.

    15. RICH
      July 31st, 2007 | 3:34 pm

      If Torre’s going to be blamed for Proctor’s poor performance, was Proctor ever above average? If so, who gets the credit for his performance?

      He wasn’t a shining star in the Dodgers’ system before coming here.

      To me, he’s an average pitcher, good at times and terrible at other times. That has some value but he is what he is.

      Some of the people writing here give me the impression he was a Cy Young candidate waiting to blossom.

    16. baileywalk
      July 31st, 2007 | 3:36 pm

      On the topic of Torre abusing his pitchers, Cliff wrote a great article about it in 2005.

      http://bronxbanter.baseballtoaster.com/archives/178976.html

      I’ve posted that link before. But it’s a really good read and discusses his use of pitchers throughout his career.

    17. Santino53
      July 31st, 2007 | 3:41 pm

      According to the San Diego Union-Tribune you can add the Padres to the Orioles as an interested Igawa buyer told he is unavailable.
      This sickens me. Proctor given away for not much in return , Farnsworthless still here at 3:30 and
      Cashman fighting his damaged ego deluding himself that Igawa’s “mechanics” are all that need be fixed. And if it is mechanics,the Yankee infrastructure ( Connors, Contreras, Guidry) may
      not be the ones to solve it.

    18. Raf
      July 31st, 2007 | 3:53 pm

      Proctor given away for not much in return
      ===========
      That isn’t true.

    19. Don
      July 31st, 2007 | 6:38 pm

      The Yankees refuse to pay any of Farnsworth’s contract if traded. And he can still be dealt.

    20. July 31st, 2007 | 6:45 pm

      i dont mind THAT much not giving away Igawa. i’m sure the offers for him were extremely low. he’d be traded at low value right now. maybe next year he can be an effective reliever. i know that’s a big maybe, but he has decent stuff, is a LHP, and is just 28.

      now if you come back and tell me what the offers were, i might think differently.

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