• Tommy John For Brackman

    Posted by on August 27th, 2007 · Comments (8)

    From the Post -

    Andrew Brackman, the Yankees’ first-round pick in the June draft, has decided his right elbow will be better served by undergoing Tommy John surgery, according to agent Scott Boras.

    Brackman, who signed a four-year deal worth $4.5 million that includes a $3.3 million signing bonus and could escalate to $13.8 million if incentives are met, has chosen Dr. James Andrews to do the procedure, which normally takes 12 to 18 months to come back from.

    The Yankees knew of the 6-foot-10 Brackman’s elbow problems long before taking him with the final pick in the first round. A recent visit to Andrews’ office confirmed a problem and Brackman decided to have the surgery, which, according to Boras, has a 97-percent success rate.

    Christian Garcia, Humberto Sanchez, J. Brent Cox, Mark Melancon and now Andrew Brackman. The Yankees are putting together an all-prospect “Who’s who” of Tommy John jobs.

    Comments on Tommy John For Brackman

    1. August 27th, 2007 | 1:25 pm

      I’m pretty ignorant when it comes to prospects and drafts – what’s the logic behind spending a first-round draft pick and a few million dollars on a guy who already has this kind of elbow problem? I would have thought pitching prospects were already enough of a crap shoot. Is the theory that players often come back from TJ surgery even stronger?

    2. August 27th, 2007 | 2:10 pm

      Some do believe that.

    3. Don
      August 27th, 2007 | 2:32 pm

      Players do not come back “stronger” after TJ surgery. That is myth. Just a few examples: Sean Henn, Brandon Clausen, Eric Gagne.

      This was a bad pick and a bad signing by the Yankees. Dumb, IOW. Brackman won’t compete now until 2009. And this is a guy with messed-up mechanics to go along with a rebuilt elbow.

      That Ca$hman signed him to such an exhorbitant deal is mind-boggling. This guy will be available two years from now, as damaged goods, had the Yankees not erred.

      Either the Yankees don’t take him to begin with or, after they do, thus realizing the foolish investment needed, don’t sign him and have the 31st pick in 2008.

    4. rbj
      August 27th, 2007 | 2:52 pm

      ~Players do not come back “stronger” after TJ surgery. That is myth. Just a few examples: Sean Henn, Brandon Clausen, Eric Gagne.~

      There’s one guy who would beg to differ with you. Name escapes me at the moment, Timmy? Tummy? something like that for his first name. Last name is along the lines of Johnson or some such.

      If you’re a good pitcher before TJ surgery, and it’s done right, you’ll be a good pitcher again. I wouldn’t put a fork in Gagne just yet.

    5. August 27th, 2007 | 3:14 pm

      FWIW:

      Of 68 Major League Baseball pitchers who underwent the surgery between 1998 and 2003, most (82 percent) returned to play within an average of 18.5 months post-surgery with no change in average earned run average or walks or hits per innings pitched, Dr. Brett W. Gibson of the Penn Sports Medicine Center in Philadelphia and colleagues found.

      From: http://www.reuters.com/article/healthNews/idUSCOL45333120070504

      Still, I think Don is not all the way wrong when he says:

      This was a bad pick and a bad signing by the Yankees. Dumb, IOW. Brackman won’t compete now until 2009. And this is a guy with messed-up mechanics to go along with a rebuilt elbow.

      ~~~If you’re going to spend that much, get a guy with an OK elbow and good mechanics…at least I would.

    6. JohnnyC
      August 27th, 2007 | 4:13 pm

      Darn it, Steve, don’t confuse me with facts. Facts…facts are stupid! I happen to like my opinions, thank you very much. I’d like to keep them, no matter the empirical data.

    7. baileywalk
      August 27th, 2007 | 5:05 pm

      The pick isn’t bad — they had the last pick in the first round and didn’t have many high-ceiling prospects left to choose from (the guy they really wanted to overspend on had just been picked up by Detroit). What’s bad is that they let Boras hold them over a barrel and extract a ridiculous deal when his client had no leverage. It doesn’t make sense why they gave Brackman so much money. Taking a risk on him despite his need for TJS isn’t a big deal — if you believe the hype, he’s a once-in-a-lifetime talent. It’s the contract that they ended up giving him that’s dumb. With the pitching talent they have right now, they should have been willing to not sign Brackman and take the extra pick next year. Clearly, they wanted to sign him no matter what and they let Boras suck them dry.

      One thing to keep in mind, though: everyone hated the Ian Kennedy signing last year and thought they had vastly overpaid him. The Yankees know a lot more about these kids than we do. This is a different situation because Brackman has an injury, but it’s good to keep in mind that no one at the time knew Joba would be this good, and most fans were down about Kennedy and Hughes (who no one knew).

    8. Don
      August 27th, 2007 | 6:45 pm

      I did say that it is a myth that pitchers come back stronger and that data proves my point, thanks Steve.

      Kennedy got nothing near to what Ca$hman gave Brackman, plus a ML contract. Nor did Joba. And neither one came with: WARNING! Tommy John Surgery Ahead. USE CAUTION!

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