• Bronx Banter Offers Book Excerpt

    Posted by on September 26th, 2007 · Comments (5)

    Bronx Banter has an excerpt from “It Ain’t over ’til It’s over: The Baseball Prospectus Pennant Race Book posted today.

    It’s from Steven Goldman and it’s entitled “How to Break Up the Yankees.”

    Click here to read it.

    To be candid, I have not always been a fan of Goldman’s work. But, this piece will be a trip down memory lane for some and an education for others. The excerpt is worth checking out, if you haven’t seen it yet.

    Comments on Bronx Banter Offers Book Excerpt

    1. jonm
      September 26th, 2007 | 6:51 pm

      Steve,
      Why are you a Goldman critic?

      I used to be a fan of the Pinstriped Bible/Blog, but now I’ve soured on him and don’t read him very often. What irritates me is that throughout 2005, he wrote about how the Yankees would not make the playoffs. When they did, in fact, make the playoffs, he never even showed any self-deprecating humility.

      This year he was even worse; he seemed to run out of interesting column ideas. Thus, he wrote several posts saying that the Yankees had no chance of making the post-season — still, he has issued no mea culpa. There just seems to be a smug arrogance about the way that he makes predictions in his writing.

      He knows his baseball history and he is able to write in an interesting way about that.

    2. A Tampa Yankee in King George's Court
      September 26th, 2007 | 8:55 pm

      Steve
      Thanks for the link, I found that article very interesting and liked it a lot.

      However, one thing I found to be incorrect is that it was said that they didnt find a way to break up the Yankees, the Yankees did it themselves. That is not entirely accurate as baseball enacted the luxury tax otherwise known as the “Yankee” tax and revenue sharing designed to make it easier for all the other teams to retain their free agents thus nullifying the Yankees ability to use their natural advantage of being in the largest media market in the country. Just as they enacted that rule about not being able to trade with the pennant winner, the luxury tax/revenue sharing was specifically designed to “break up the Yankees.”

      By the way did you know you got a mention/hat tip in Rob Neyer’s ESPN insider blog. I will try to find the link and send it to you.

    3. September 27th, 2007 | 5:27 am

      ~~~Why are you a Goldman critic?~~~

      Nothing major. I just don’t find his style to be entertaining, to me. And, sometimes, I find it hard to follow – in terms of what point he’s trying to make.

      To be fair, though, you can say the same thing about my writing at times too.

      Tampa Yankee – I had no idea. Thanks. Please do send the link. Thanks.

    4. Raf
      September 27th, 2007 | 7:30 am

      That is not entirely accurate as baseball enacted the luxury tax otherwise known as the “Yankee” tax and revenue sharing designed to make it easier for all the other teams to retain their free agents thus nullifying the Yankees ability to use their natural advantage of being in the largest media market in the country.
      =====================
      That isn’t necessarily true, especially when you consider what other teams have done.

      Correlation does not equal causation.

    5. A Tampa Yankee in King George's Court
      September 28th, 2007 | 11:11 pm

      Hey Steve
      Sorry it took so long but here is the link. You have to buy the ESPN Insider so I am not sure if you can access it….

      http://insider.espn.go.com/espn/blog/index?name=neyer_rob&entryDate=20070925

      If you cant access the link I will just copy post Neyer’s blog post in here so you can at least read it….

      No arguing N.Y.’s signing of Rocketposted: Tuesday, September 25, 2007 | Feedback | Print Entry

      So Roger Clemens has been scratched from tonight’s start, and is being replaced by Kei Igawa? As WasWatching’s Steve Lombardi says, “Makes sense — if Carl Pavano can pitch on Opening Day, why not have Igawa go on the night where you can clinch a playoff berth? It’s the perfect bookends for this wacky season.”

      All’s well that ends well, I guess. But while acknowledging that October might change the equation, isn’t it fair to wonder if Clemens’ $17.4 million salary has been money well spent? This month the Yankees are 1-1 in games started by their highest-paid pitcher, and 14-5 in the rest of them.

      I will argue that the Yankees shouldn’t have blown all that money on a gimpy old guy like Clemens, but I’ll also argue that almost any team in the Yankees’ position would have done exactly the same thing.

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