• Good News If The Yankees Face Tribe In ALDS?

    Posted by on September 26th, 2007 · Comments (10)

    One of the fun things that BaseballReference.com offers is batting splits per type of pitcher faced.

    This is how the pitchers are “typed”: Power pitchers strike out or walk more than 28% of batters faced, Finesse pitchers strike out or walks less than 24% of batters faced. Stats are based on the three years before and after (when available), and the season for when the split is computed. A split in 1994 would consider years 1991-1997.

    Updating something I did in July, here’s how the Yankees batters break down on this, to date:

    Split	        G	PA	BA	OBP	SLG
    vs. Power	132	2033	.254	.344	.395
    vs. P/F	        112	1878	.296	.367	.481
    vs. Fin.	130	2389	.310	.377	.501
    

    Clearly, the Yankees batters are not too crazy about “power” pitchers.

    Here are all the teams in the majors, to date, in terms of K+BB/BF – via the Complete Baseball Encyclopedia:

    BFP	SO	BB
    Cubs	6010	1174	561	28.9%
    Marlins	6335	1111	645	27.7%
    Orioles	6191	1050	666	27.7%
    Dodgers	5996	1151	502	27.6%
    DRays	6209	1151	550	27.4%
    Red Sox	5890	1110	472	26.9%
    Mets	6098	1082	552	26.8%
    Brewers	6078	1133	491	26.7%
    Angels	6011	1130	465	26.5%
    Giants	6139	1034	583	26.3%
    Dbacks	6025	1057	527	26.3%
    Braves	6092	1069	527	26.2%
    Rangers	6242	958	655	25.8%
    Padres	6002	1080	449	25.5%
    Tigers	6215	1030	552	25.5%
    Jays	5910	1032	465	25.3%
    Yanks	6081	975	561	25.3%
    Phils	6202	1007	549	25.1%
    Astros	6224	1066	491	25.0%
    A's	6097	1002	517	24.9%
    M's	6093	981	534	24.9%
    Twins	5953	1062	407	24.7%
    Reds	6159	1029	469	24.3%
    W-Sox	6109	986	489	24.1%
    Royals	6070	955	501	24.0%
    Nat.	6182	910	568	23.9%
    Pirates	6174	964	504	23.8%
    Indians	5988	1012	402	23.6%
    Cards	6092	911	499	23.1%
    Rockies	6046	911	481	23.0%
    

    Interesting – look at the O’s and D-Rays. Maybe this is why the Yankees have had issues with Baltimore and Tampa Bay this season?

    But, also, look at the Indians. This could be another reason why the Yankees could have an edge against Cleveland in the ALDS.

    Comments on Good News If The Yankees Face Tribe In ALDS?

    1. baileywalk
      September 26th, 2007 | 1:59 pm

      Aren’t Sabathia and Carmona considered power guys? Carmona, despite the fact that they hit him around once this year, seems like exactly the type of guy that gives the Yanks trouble: someone with a plus-fastball with movement on it.

    2. September 26th, 2007 | 2:53 pm

      Carmona, power? Not so much…see:

      Fernando Cabrera 38.9%
      Jensen Lewis 34.8%
      Tom Mastny 33.6%
      Rafael Perez 32.6%
      Rafael Betancourt 30.2%
      Aaron Fultz 29.5%
      Roberto Hernandez 27.2%
      Joe Borowski 25.8%
      C.C. Sabathia 25.4%
      Jake Westbrook 22.9%
      Cliff Lee 22.8%
      Fausto Carmona 22.8%
      Jason Stanford 19.5%
      Aaron Laffey 18.7%
      Edward Mujica 15.0%
      Paul Byrd 14.1%
      Jeremy Sowers 13.4%

    3. September 26th, 2007 | 2:56 pm

      The above % are K+BB/BF totals, to date, for Tribe pitchers.

    4. Pete
      September 26th, 2007 | 3:01 pm

      Then how to explain our success against the Red Sox as opposed to the Angels, who rank lower on your chart?

    5. September 26th, 2007 | 3:47 pm

      Pete – Playing .500 against a team for the last several years is success?

    6. baileywalk
      September 26th, 2007 | 4:16 pm

      Carmona is a powersinker guy — he doesn’t strike out a ton, but he throws 93-97 mph. Can you really categorize “what” a pitcher is based on stats and not stuff? If Carmona’s not a power guy, he’s also nothing close to a finesse guy. Wang is the exact same type of pitcher — throws 93-96, but doesn’t strike anyone out.

      Do these calculations work the same for relievers and starters? Because one thing Borowski is not is a power pitcher.

      I was looking these pitchers up and I saw that Sabathia is at 234 innings already, well above anything he’s thrown before. I wonder if there’s any concern about him wearing down for the playoffs (though there’s been no sign of that in his performance).

      Also, Borowski was very briefly a Yankee. Can’t say I remember that. He was here in ’97 and ’98.

    7. Pete
      September 26th, 2007 | 4:23 pm

      >> Pete – Playing .500 against a team for the last several years is success? >>

      Compared to how we play the Angels? YES! :D

    8. baileywalk
      September 26th, 2007 | 4:23 pm

      Yankees haven’t faced Sabathia since 2004. He threw a decent game: 6 IP, 3 ER, 4 BB, 3 SO. Olerud and Posada hit home runs off of him.

      The most amazing thing about this game: Cairo hit a home run.

    9. September 26th, 2007 | 4:56 pm

      baileywalk, Power pitchers strike out or walk more than 28% of batters faced, so, yes, Borowski is not is a power pitcher.

    10. baileywalk
      September 26th, 2007 | 11:43 pm

      So then Sabathia isn’t a power pitcher either? I think most people would say he is. You can’t go by a pitcher’s stats with walks and strikeouts to determine what kind of pitcher they are. If Kennedy and Mussina put up the same numbers as Clemens and Hughes, the first two are still finesse guys and the latter two are power guys. Your style is determined by your stuff.

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