• September 10th @ The Angels

    Posted by on September 10th, 2008 · Comments (2)

    With this one, the Yankees have played 146 games this season.

    Based on what I know, I would guess – with great confidence – that in at least 100 of those 146 games the Yankees line-up has included Johnny Damon, Derek Jeter, Bobby Abreu, Alex Rodriguez and Jason Giambi (all at the same time).

    Today’s game was the 46th time this season where the Yankees have scored 2 runs or less in the contest.

    How does a team who has Johnny Damon, Derek Jeter, Bobby Abreu, Alex Rodriguez and Jason Giambi – together – more than two-thirds of the time score two runs or less in almost one-third of their games?

    It’s not because Damon, Jeter and Abreu are not getting on base. More so, it’s because Jason Giambi – who has batted 5th in the Yankees line-up, most times when he has played, this season – came into this game with a .216 BA with RISP (in 172 PA). And, it’s because Robinson Cano, who usually bats 6th or 7th in the Yankees line-up, just doesn’t drive in runners – period.

    It’s too late now, but, Xavier Nady should have been the Yankees number five hitter once he joined this team on July 26th.

    Since that time, including this game, the Yankees have gone 20-24.

    During that time span, Giambi has 31 hits in 134 AB – while Nady has 48 hits in 165 AB. That’s a .231 BA for Giambi and a .291 BA for Nady.

    You want to know why the Yankees plate 2 runs or less in so many games? Blame Giambi. And, blame Girardi for batting him fifth too many times too.

    Comments on September 10th @ The Angels

    1. Tresh Fan
      September 11th, 2008 | 1:41 am

      Much of the problem has to do with the current obsession over lefty/righty staggered batting orders. The rationale of which is that it prevents opposing managers from getting the “platoon advantage” (to use Bill James’s phrase) for more than one batter when bringing in a reliever. While conceding that such a strategy may have some benefit in later innings, it does tend to create some curious designs in the arrangement of batting orders—two in particular being

      (1) your #5 hitter, batting behind Alex Rodriguez, MUST be a lefthanded hitter, and

      (2) Xavier Nady cannot bat higher than 6th.

      Of course, with Posada and Matsui out for most the season that left Girardi with just two options for his #5 hitter: Giambi or Cano. But now with Matsui back I really don’t see why Giambi should still be batting 5th. It doesn’t make sense. It’s counterproductive. And if Girardi can’t see that, well…..

    2. MJ
      September 11th, 2008 | 9:01 am

      (1) your #5 hitter, batting behind Alex Rodriguez, MUST be a lefthanded hitter, and

      (2) Xavier Nady cannot bat higher than 6th.
      ———————————
      AAARGGGH! This sounds like one of those logic games puzzles on the LSAT! :-)

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