• Cashman: Last 3 Years Not Good, Lots Of Work To Be Done

    Posted by on September 25th, 2008 · Comments (16)

    Via George King -

    “For the past three years we really only played five games beyond Sept. 30,” [Brian] Cashman said. “The challenge is to get through the month of October. There is a lot of work to be done.”

    “We are what we are, not deserving of the postseason,” Cashman said.

    And, yet, many – including the Brothers Stein – want to allow the architect of this mess to continue to work on the project. Crazy, huh?

    Comments on Cashman: Last 3 Years Not Good, Lots Of Work To Be Done

    1. MJ
      September 25th, 2008 | 8:58 am

      Without devolving into the usual nonsense Steve, here’s something you have to at least consider while you’re sharpening your executioner’s axe:

      Assuming the Yanks fire Cashman and replace him with [insert your favorite candidate here], is there any reason to believe that this person would be able to (1) wield the authority within the organization such that we wouldn’t return to the bad days of Tampa vs. New York, (2) handle the stupider of the two Steinbrenner sons (Hank, clearly) such that his meddlesome nature wouldn’t interfere with the running of the club, or (3) not pull a 180 and revert back to the concept that player development doesn’t work in New York and give us a New York Knicks/1980′s Yanks type of situation?

      Whether one is pro-Cashman or anti-Cashman, I think everyone should stop and consider that the devil you don’t know may not do a better job, given the inherent dysfunction in the ownership gene pool and the tabloid pressure/revisionist history atmosphere that demands a reactionary response to missing the playoffs.

    2. September 25th, 2008 | 9:10 am

      MJ – then, how about this…

      http://waswatching.com/2008/08/29/cashman-im-clueless-to-blame/

      do like I said, promote Cashman, keep the devil that you know, and get another devil to help that devil in making better player moves?

    3. MJ
      September 25th, 2008 | 9:15 am

      In this case, the promotion you suggest is a demotion which effectively is the same thing as firing him. Doing so brings us back to square one and the questions I raised above.

    4. September 25th, 2008 | 9:37 am

      It’s not the same as firing him. He gets to stay with the Yankees, enjoy everything that brings, make tons of money, enjoy the fame of being the face of the team, etc.

      That’s no where near the same as being unemployed.

    5. September 25th, 2008 | 9:53 am

      and yet you wonder why readership and comments have gone down in the recent month or two?

    6. williamnyy
      September 25th, 2008 | 10:17 am

      I have to agree with TurnTwo. I ventured back here to fill the void of the winding down season and it feels like I never left. I have no problem with criticism of Cashman if it is well reasoned. Instead, it seems as if every little news tidbit is used to make the same point. That gets pretty lame and tiresome. Maybe I’ll check back in a few months and see if we’ve moved on any further.

    7. MJ
      September 25th, 2008 | 10:35 am

      It’s not the same as firing him. He gets to stay with the Yankees, enjoy everything that brings, make tons of money, enjoy the fame of being the face of the team, etc.

      That’s no where near the same as being unemployed.
      —————————
      Don’t play coy with me. “Promoting” him to a position where he would give up the day-to-day baseball operations decision-making is the same as firing him. The question isn’t about if he can afford to send his kids to Exeter, Harvard, and Yale, it’s about running the show as Cashman has done from October 2005-present.

      So, back to my question. How to address my points for the next guy?

    8. September 25th, 2008 | 10:39 am

      Oh, I get it, to be a popular blog, you have to write things like:

      Yo, Yo, Yo, Ca$h-Money iz da bomb, yeaaaaa! He rulz! Check it!

      or…

      I cannot blame Brian Cashman for the signings of Carl Pavano and Kei Igawa. They seemed like the right moves at the time. Further, Mr. Cashman now has a vision of building from within that will carry the Yankees forward…and no one can doubt that this plan will not succeed.

      – - thanks guys, now I know what to do.

      [rolls eyes]

    9. September 25th, 2008 | 10:40 am

      ~~“Promoting” him to a position where he would give up the day-to-day baseball operations decision-making is the same as firing him.~~

      You got it wrong…the promotion will allow him to oversee the person making the day-to-day baseball operations decision-making…

      hence, it’s more power and authority.

    10. MJ
      September 25th, 2008 | 10:59 am

      You got it wrong…the promotion will allow him to oversee the person making the day-to-day baseball operations decision-making…

      hence, it’s more power and authority.
      ————————————-
      Now you’re being disingenuous. Overseeing the person making the day-to-day decisions is not the same as what he does now.

      Even if Cashman remains within the organization and becomes the conduit for dealing with Steinbrenner-created dysfunction and a restive media, you still have not addressed the fundamental questions of whether this person could (1) wield the authority within the organization such that we wouldn’t return to the bad days of Tampa vs. New York, (2) handle the stupider of the two Steinbrenner sons (Hank, clearly) such that his meddlesome nature wouldn’t interfere with the running of the club, or (3) not pull a 180 and revert back to the concept that player development doesn’t work in New York and give us a New York Knicks/1980’s Yanks type of situation.

      Simply having Cash above the new GM as a figurehead doesn’t address these points.

    11. Raf
      September 25th, 2008 | 11:10 am

      Simply having Cash above the new GM as a figurehead doesn’t address these points.
      ———–
      As a matter of fact, it makes it worse, because you have another faction added to the mix.

    12. September 25th, 2008 | 11:13 am

      “Oh, I get it, to be a popular blog, you have to write things like:

      Yo, Yo, Yo, Ca$h-Money iz da bomb, yeaaaaa! He rulz! Check it!”

      yup, exactly what was said. you’ve got it.

    13. Raf
      September 25th, 2008 | 11:28 am

      I cannot blame Brian Cashman for the signings of Carl Pavano and Kei Igawa. They seemed like the right moves at the time. Further, Mr. Cashman now has a vision of building from within that will carry the Yankees forward…and no one can doubt that this plan will not succeed.
      ————-
      I don’t think anyone’s asking you to do that. I’ll ask you to be reasonable, and be fair.

      Pavano was a stupid signing, no doubt about it. I said it then, I’ll say it now.

      Igawa, less so.

      Trading for Weaver, Brown, Vazquez, ARod, etc, all made sense at the time. As did signing Giambi, Mussina & Clemens.

      Not sure what you want from Cashman; in the example from last year, I don’t see how he could’ve prevented Wang from imploding twice in the playoffs, or Posada from properly blocking Joba’s slider. I don’t know how he could’ve prevented the collapse of 2004 (you have a 1 run lead, & Rivera on the mound; even if that game is blown, you have Mussina & Lieber in the hole), not sure how he could’ve prevented the injuries or the offense underperforming, so on and so forth…

    14. gphunt
      September 25th, 2008 | 1:02 pm

      Hypo situation:

      Yanks win World Series with core of new and old Yankee farmhands. (Jeter, Rivera, Posada and Hughes, Chamberlain, Wang, Cano…etc) Cashman declined to come back at the end of the 2008 Season.

      Will you label it Cashman’s championship? Or will it be the new GM’s championship?

    15. September 25th, 2008 | 2:11 pm

      Assuming that all the heavy lifting was done by the guys Cashman put on the team, it would be his championship…meaning Brian.

      BTW, Jeter, Posada and Rivera were not put on the team by Cashman.

    16. gphunt
      September 25th, 2008 | 2:51 pm

      Yeah, I know they weren’t. I can’t really still credit Gene Michael with any championships that may come in the next few years that those guys are still around.

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