• Media At Odds With Girardi For Being Misleading

    Posted by on September 26th, 2008 · Comments (19)

    Mark Feinsand and Joel Sherman cover the issue in their blogs today.

    Maybe, when asked about player injuries, Girardi should just say: “Because of HIPAA laws and the privacy act, I cannot confirm or deny anything about [insert name of player].”….

    Or, maybe, the media, when not satisfied with the answers from Joe, should just call Cashman? After all, if you were on the phone with a service rep, or you were in a store talking to a sales person, and you didn’t like or trust what they were telling you, wouldn’t you then ask to speak to their supervisor? Is this any different?

    Girardi, obviously, feels pretty strong about not giving out information on the health-status of players. Rather than clamor about how he must change on this, perhaps it just makes more sense for the media to find a work-around…like ask the player and/or Cashman? Or, ask Jason Zillo – the Yankees Manager of Media Relations?

    Comments on Media At Odds With Girardi For Being Misleading

    1. Raf
      September 26th, 2008 | 10:39 am

      If this is the game Girardi wants to play, I don’t think he can win. I’m not the biggest fan of sportswriters, but I don’t think it’s a good idea to unnecessarily rattle their cages.

    2. antone
      September 26th, 2008 | 11:11 am

      This is garbage for these guys to blast Girardi for this. Last time I checked the shoulder was part of the body and it could be feeling cranky. Doesn’t mean Girardi lied to them about it and quite frankly they should feel privileged to be able to cover the Yankees on a day to day basis, so they need to shut up and stop complaining about damn injury information. You take what you get, and Girardi does not work for the media, he works for the Yankees.

      My guess is that they are pissed because someone else found out what was really going on before they did.

    3. bfriley76
      September 26th, 2008 | 11:47 am

      The media isn’t owed anything or entitled to any sort of information, but that’s not really the problem here. The problem is that when Girardi is talking to the media, he’s, in essence, talking to the fans, because that’s how we get our information. So when he lies to or is misleading to the media about an injury (and this isn’t the first time he’s done it this season) he’s lying to or misleading the fans. Like Feinsand says in the comments to his post, I think most of us would rather get nothing than be lied to.

      Pete Abe touched on this on his blog yesterday too. This was the most interesting part:

      ====
      It has gotten to the point where team officials now apologize to reporters for the manager’s actions. Nobody is sure why he does it because he gets caught every time.
      ====

      So it seems like it’s not only bothering the reporters at this point. I seem to remember reading somewhere when Girardi was hired that he was a fan of Bill Bellicheck. Maybe he’s gone to school too hard on the way Bill handles his injury reports.

    4. Raf
      September 26th, 2008 | 12:07 pm

      You take what you get, and Girardi does not work for the media, he works for the Yankees.
      ————-
      And part of working for the Yankees is dealing with the media.

      Tempest in a teapot, and all this could’ve been avoided.

    5. MJ
      September 26th, 2008 | 12:15 pm

      Girardi, obviously, feels pretty strong about not giving out information on the health-status of players. Rather than clamor about how he must change on this, perhaps it just makes more sense for the media to find a work-around…like ask the player and/or Cashman?
      ————————
      Certainly lying isn’t the answer to handling media relations in New York or elsewhere. However, the proposed solution of giving the media nothing and letting them work around the problem isn’t a good one either. The GM has more important things to do than have daily conference calls and press conferences with the media on the subject of blisters, flu-like symptoms, or whatever other minor aches and pains a roster of 25 players might encounter over a six month period. And simply asking the player isn’t a good idea because the team should always strive for uniformity in their answers. Case in point, Pavano told the NY Times that he thinks the Yankees team doctors did a bad job with him and prevented him from getting his arm surgery by several months. You don’t think this might be a bad policy?

    6. antone
      September 26th, 2008 | 12:22 pm

      As a fan I could personally care less what Girardi says to the media. If Mo is missing the game then sure I’d like to know why but does it really matter why? NOPE.

      Sure part of his job is dealing with media and answering their questions…but it’s up to him how he answers them. They should be happy to get answers out of him period. This is not a situation where Girardi is telling reports he will meet with them and blows them off. Then I could see them being pissed.

      You must need to have a certain personality to be a reporter because it seems like a great deal of them have a sense of entitlement.

    7. bfriley76
      September 26th, 2008 | 12:48 pm

      As a fan I could personally care less what Girardi says to the media. If Mo is missing the game then sure I’d like to know why but does it really matter why? NOPE.

      ====
      The spectrum of reports on Mo’s injury range from a “Cranky Body” to “needs shoulder surgery.” You’re telling me that it doesn’t matter which of those it is?

      Sure, it’s up to Girardi how he deals with the media, but if he continues to lie and mislead, the resentment is going to end up trickling down from said media, and eventually infect the majority of a fan base. Is that the type of relationship a 1st year manager wants with his fans? Especially when he was captaining the ship when they failed to make the playoffs for the first time in over a decade?

      (PLEASE NOTE…I don’t blame Girardi for the Yankees not making the playoffs, I’m just saying that antagonizing the fan-base, considering the results this year, might not be the best move.)

    8. antone
      September 26th, 2008 | 12:56 pm

      No I don’t care right now..because the truth will come out eventually…are we going to act like we won’t find out what’s going unless it comes from Girardi’s mouth???

    9. MJ
      September 26th, 2008 | 12:56 pm

      (PLEASE NOTE…I don’t blame Girardi for the Yankees not making the playoffs, I’m just saying that antagonizing the fan-base, considering the results this year, might not be the best move.)
      ——————————
      I agree. The last thing you want to be as a manager is both dishonest and unsuccessful. Fans will tolerate a cat-and-mouse game with the media as long as the team is successful. But fighting for a third place finish AND giving the media an excuse to hate you and be vindictive, that’s a bad recipe for survival.

    10. antone
      September 26th, 2008 | 12:59 pm

      The media needs to grow up…it is a privilege to cover the Yankees..they need to stop whining like little babies because they don’t get their way.

    11. YankCrank
      September 26th, 2008 | 1:09 pm

      You guys don’t get it. Sports writers are there as a reporting source for the fans of the Yankee franchise. So, when Girardi withholds information he is, in so many ways, making the job of the ones who speak to the fan base that much more difficult. Sports writers are an extension of the public, a public that watches and loves the New York Yankees…so Girardi can’t continue to insult and lie to the highest form of our fan base.

    12. bfriley76
      September 26th, 2008 | 1:10 pm

      it is a privilege to cover the Yankees
      ===
      Uh no…it’s a job. A very cool job that I’m sure MANY MANY people would love to have, but it’s still a job.

      When someone goes out of the way to make it difficult to do your job correctly, it’s not surprising that you’d be bothered by that.

      Listen…it’s not like the concept of the sports reporter just popped up and people aren’t aware of how things work with them. You might not particularly like reporters but their job is covering the team. When Girardi lies/misleads them he not only makes their jobs harder–giving them reason to be annoyed–but he’s also creating another story…”The Lying Manager.” He’s been caught enough this year that you’d think he’d have learned his lesson. He only has himself to blame for this backlash now.

    13. Raf
      September 26th, 2008 | 1:10 pm

      But fighting for a third place finish AND giving the media an excuse to hate you and be vindictive, that’s a bad recipe for survival.
      ——-
      Ask Willie :)

    14. antone
      September 26th, 2008 | 1:20 pm

      It is a job but also a privilege because I’m sure there is a line of reporters wishing they had the same access to the Yankees that they do on a regular basis. It is their job to report on what happens with the team and what the Yankees want them to know. It’s not their job to call out people as liars. They are just pissed that they can’t get what they want.

    15. bfriley76
      September 26th, 2008 | 1:59 pm

      It is a job but also a privilege because I’m sure there is a line of reporters wishing they had the same access to the Yankees that they do on a regular basis.

      =====

      Which is exactly why they HAVE to do their jobs well, or their employers will replace them. Not trying to get all the information they can because the Manager doesn’t like talking about injuries would be stupid of them. A player being injured IS something that happens with the team, and obviously the Yankees are OK with them knowing more specific information about Mo’s injury because Cashman divulged it.

      Additionally, it’s not their job to report what the team wants them to know, it’s their job to report the news, whether the team wants us to know it or not. That’s what being a reporter is. If someone is lying, they should call him or her a liar.

      I’m going to take this to a sort of ridiculous extreme to try and get my point across. Lets say the Yankees were cheating in a way that wasn’t overtly obvious, but that made a significant difference in their chances of winning. If a reporter found out about it, should he not report it? The team would obviously not want us to know about it? Of course he should report on it, because that’s his/her job. This hasn’t gone that far, but I hope you get my point.

    16. Raf
      September 26th, 2008 | 2:15 pm

      It is their job to report on what happens with the team and what the Yankees want them to know.
      ———-
      That only applies to the YES network… Rest of the reporters report what happens to and with the Yankees, good and bad.

    17. OnceIWasAYankeeFan
      September 26th, 2008 | 2:26 pm

      I said last October that Girardi was prickly with the puppy-dog like media of south Florida and that it would be far worse in New York.

      This is only the latest little tempest that proves my point.

    18. September 26th, 2008 | 2:30 pm

      >> I’m just saying that antagonizing the fan-base, considering the results this year, might not be the best move >>

      Who’s antagonized? In this particular situation, I don’t give a rat’s ass that Mo’s missing the last 3 games. I *do* care if he needs surgery, but only if it’s something out of the ordinary and could be career-threatening.

      The beat reporters jump down Girardi’s throat every time there’s the slightest whiff of a story, then blast him for not offering full disclosure 3 nanoseconds after the end of a ballgame.

      Seems to me that if the media would accept, “We’ll have that information for you at a later time” as an answer, Girardi wouldn’t seem so testy when pressed…

    19. Raf
      September 26th, 2008 | 3:13 pm

      The beat reporters jump down Girardi’s throat every time there’s the slightest whiff of a story, then blast him for not offering full disclosure 3 nanoseconds after the end of a ballgame.
      ————
      Of course, had he played ball from the get-go, things could’ve gone smoother?

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.