• Which Yanks Whiffed The Most/Least In ’08?

    Posted by on January 23rd, 2009 · Comments (15)

    Seeing Rich Lederer’s K/100P study on pitchers, I decided to see what would happen if we applied the same look at Yankees batters in 2008. Here’s what I found:

    Player		PA	K	P/PA	P Seen	K/100P
    Jus. Christian	43	4	3.4	146	2.74
    Robinson Cano	634	65	3.4	2156	3.02
    Johnny Damon	623	82	4.1	2554	3.21
    Hideki Matsui	378	47	3.8	1436	3.27
    Derek Jeter	668	85	3.7	2472	3.44
    Melky Cabrera	453	58	3.7	1676	3.46
    Bobby Abreu	684	109	4.3	2941	3.71
    Al. Gonzalez	58	8	3.5	203	3.94
    Ivan Rodriguez	101	15	3.5	354	4.24
    Jason Giambi	565	111	4.3	2430	4.57
    Shelley Duncan	65	13	4.3	280	4.65
    Chad Moeller	103	18	3.5	361	4.99
    Jorge Posada	195	38	3.9	761	5.00
    Jose Molina	297	52	3.5	1040	5.00
    Alex Rodriguez	594	117	3.9	2317	5.05
    Xavier Nady	247	48	3.7	914	5.25
    Brett Gardner	141	30	3.9	550	5.46
    Cody Ransom	51	12	4.0	204	5.88
    Richie Sexson	35	10	4.7	165	6.08
    Morgan Ensberg	80	22	4.1	328	6.71
    Wilson Betemit	198	56	3.7	733	7.64
    Juan Miranda	14	4	3.1	43	9.22
    Chris Stewart	3	1	3.3	10	10.10
    Fr. Cervelli	5	3	4.0	20	15.00
    

    If you need a guy to make contact, Cano, Damon, Matsui, Jeter and Melky are pretty good at it. And, clearly, this season, Brett Gardner needs to do better at making contact. And, it probably wouldn’t hurt Nady or A-Rod to improve their numbers, here, from last year too.

    Comments on Which Yanks Whiffed The Most/Least In ’08?

    1. MJ
      January 23rd, 2009 | 3:42 pm

      Is last year’s 3.9 consistent with the rest of A-Rod’s career? If so, then I’m not worried about A-Rod. He’s producing quite nicely for the team and even a “down” year for him in 2008 he was far and away their best hitter (not even close).

    2. January 23rd, 2009 | 4:07 pm

      FWIW, as a Yankee, A-Rod has consistently seen 3.8 to 3.9 P/PA. I can’t say what his K/100P numbers are – those I have not calculated.

    3. January 23rd, 2009 | 4:33 pm

      OK, you made me look, here are A-Rod’s K/100P rates as a Yankee:

      Year * K/100P
      2004 * 4.81
      2005 * 4.98
      2006 * 5.43
      2007 * 4.46
      2008 * 5.05

    4. January 23rd, 2009 | 4:52 pm

      Is last year’s 3.9 consistent with the rest of A-Rod’s career? If so, then I’m not worried about A-Rod.
      =====================
      You were worried about A-Rod? Why?

    5. OnceIWasAYankeeFan
      January 23rd, 2009 | 4:59 pm

      The problem with Cano and Melky is that they make contact too early in the count, swinging at pitcher’s pitches. If either one learned to work the count, they’d get better results. Granted of course that Cano had pretty good results previously. But even Yankee partisans have to agree he is too often up there hacking.

    6. January 23rd, 2009 | 5:00 pm

      It seems as though there’s not a whole lot of correlation here between having a good K/100P and actually being good. After all, Cano and Melky rank well by this measure, and we all know how they did last year. So this is sort of interesting, but not terribly useful.

      Though, it might be more useful for comparing individual seasons for individual players, as A-Rod’s numbers seem to indicate.

    7. January 23rd, 2009 | 5:21 pm

      What I think K/100P for batters shows you is who has a hole in their swing and who does not – but, it doesn’t tell you that the guy without the hole is a good hitter. It just tells you that he’s got good eye-hand coordination. And, maybe, with better pitch selection, he could be a good hitter.

      Andt, maybe, just maybe, for the guy with the high K/100P rate, the guy with the hole in his swing, it tells you that you can get him out – even if he is a good hitter – if you make the right pitch.

      I’d like to see Manny’s K/100P rate. Maybe I’ll look at that later.

    8. Janks-n-Jints
      January 23rd, 2009 | 6:30 pm

      “Interestingly, the average starter’s workload has been roughly 100 pitches per start for the past several years. As such, K/100P gives us additional insight as to the approximate number of strikeouts per start.”

      =========

      So, approximate number of strikeouts per start? Gotcha.
      That’s the point of K/100P for pitchers.

      Now, what’s the point of K/100P for hitters?

      Individual hitters don’t see 100P/G on average, or anywhere near the vicinity.

      Why the arbitrary 100P for hitters?
      Is it just because 100P is a nice round number?

      Help me understand this because I’m confused.

    9. January 23rd, 2009 | 9:03 pm

      [...] The oldest living Yankee  /  Which Yanks Whiffed The Most/Least In ‘08? [...]

    10. throwstrikes
      January 23rd, 2009 | 10:47 pm

      I’ll take a strikeout over a GIDP anyday.

    11. January 23rd, 2009 | 11:26 pm

      Pretty hard to end an inning/rally with a GIDP when there are two outs.

      Pretty hard to hurt an inning/rally with a GIDP when there’s runners on second and third and no one on first.

      But, a whiff will end/hurt them every time.

    12. January 23rd, 2009 | 11:28 pm

      ~~Help me understand this because I’m confused.~~

      It just shows you something above K/PA or K/AB. It shows you if guys who take a lot of pitches whiff a lot or not. And, it shows you if guys who don’t see a lot of pitches whiff a lot or not.

    13. Janks-n-Jints
      January 24th, 2009 | 1:34 am

      So, it’s similar to the pitching version in terms of having a 100P rate, but that’s where the similarities end since it sheds the context of a per game basis.

      I think this is where I’m getting tangled up.

    14. Joel
      January 25th, 2009 | 3:49 pm

      Abreu seeing almost 3000 pitches…Maybe a one year deal?

    15. February 19th, 2009 | 7:17 pm

      [...] The oldest living Yankee  /  Which Yanks Whiffed The Most/Least In ‘08? [...]

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