• How Torre Rips Cashman In His Book

    Posted by on January 26th, 2009 · Comments (13)

    Via a SI.com book excerpt from Joe Torre’s The Yankee Years

    They had spent 12 years together, Cashman first as the assistant general manager under Bob Watson and then as the general manager of three consecutive world championship teams with Torre as the manager. Torre had presented Cashman with the lineup card from the clinching game of the 1998 World Series, the one in which those Yankees established themselves as one of the greatest teams of all time with a record 125 wins, postseason included. Torre and Cashman had shared dinners and champagne and laughs and arguments. Twelve years. It was an eternity in baseball for an executive and a manager to work together.

    But at the moment when Torre was searching for some way to save his job and turned to Cashman in his moment of need, Cashman did not so much as pass on to his bosses a proposal from Torre — a simple one, too, one that was not at all difficult to understand. Twelve years together, and it ends like this.

    Come to think of it, Torre thought, Cashman had said nothing during the entire meeting. Cashman was the general manager who had persuaded Steinbrenner after the 2005 season to put in writing that Cashman would have control over all baseball operations. The manager is a fairly important part of baseball operations. And when the future employment of the manager was being discussed, how was it that the empowered general manager had nothing at all to say?

    “Cash was sitting right over my right shoulder,” Torre said, “and never uttered a sound the whole meeting.” Cashman, for his part, says simply, “It was Joe’s meeting.”

    Only much later did Torre start to put the picture together of what had happened to his working relationship with Cashman. The personal falling-out they had in 2006 spring training over philosophical issues, Cashman’s decision not to bring back longtime center fielder Bernie Williams when his contract expired in 2006, his submission of odd lineup suggestions based on stats, his lack of regard for Ron Guidry as a pitching coach, his detachment from the “they” who were making an offer to Torre, his failure to offer any comment or support in the meeting that decided Torre’s future, his failure to personally relay Torre’s proposal to find a way to reach an agreement to the Steinbrenners …

    “I thought Cash was an ally, I really did,” Torre says. “You know, we had some differences on coaches, and the usefulness of the coaches. I know he ­didn’t think much of Guidry. And [former bench coach Don] Zimmer. You know, Zimmer ­didn’t trust Cash, and I disagreed with Zimmer vehemently for the longest time. Then, you know, you start thinking about things … I have a, I don’t want to say it’s a weakness, but I want to trust people. And I do trust people until I’m proved wrong. And it’s not going to keep me from trusting somebody else tomorrow, because it’s the only way I can do my job.”

    So, In Cash, I guess, Joe does not trust.

    Comments on How Torre Rips Cashman In His Book

    1. Tresh Fan
      January 26th, 2009 | 8:10 pm

      Gee, that’s funny (as Lt. Columbo liked to say). Verducci was on the Francesa program just this afternoon doing a splendid tap dance about how Torre wasn’t in the least way bitter about the circumstances surrounding his departure from NY—in fact Verducci asserted that Torre was “at peace” over the whole thing—and that Torre and Cashman were still on friendly terms. Any differences that had been between the GM and erstwhile Mgr were merely—what was Verducci’s term?—”philospohical.”

    2. butchie22
      January 26th, 2009 | 8:24 pm

      Everyone knows that I dislike Cash Man intensely BUT Joe presided over the biggest post season collapse of all time. What did Joe think was going to happen after he fell asleep 3 games up on Boston. He thought that he was impervious to his sanctity as St Joe? Cash man like St Joe was concerned about his own butt if anything. From what i understand from the numerous stories about Torre including the Phil Niekro trade down in Atlanta among many, St Joe is much more of a Machiavellian figure than he is given credit for. Anyway, this is all bloody split milk so St Joe can whine all he wants, he’s lucky they didn’t kick his ass out after that embarrassing run in the 2004 playoffs. That’s what he deserved in my opinion………..

    3. lisaswan
      January 26th, 2009 | 8:43 pm

      Steve, while you know that I have plenty of issues with Cashman, I think he was:

      * Right not to offer Bernie Williams a guaranteed year

      * Correct to come up with lineups based on stats rather than Joe’s whim

      * And spot-on about Ron Guidry being a lousy pitching coach (even though he’s still one of my favorite players)

      Besides, Cashman totally saved Joe’s job in 2006, something Torre seems to forget here.

      Anybody still believe the spin that Cash is okay with this book? Given that he’s as thin-skinned as Joe, I sure don’t.

    4. mosely23
      January 26th, 2009 | 9:43 pm

      Bad move on Torre’s part. As much as he has his critics, he is a beloved figure in the history of the Yankee franchise. Why he needed to muddy the waters further makes no sense whatsoever. The franchise is far bigger than the current players and the current administration. He should’ve stayed above it all. The book makes no sense. He should thank Torre for standing by him as long as he did.

    5. Joseph M
      January 26th, 2009 | 10:29 pm

      Torre is about Torre, always has been, always will be. It’s the Torre way. It’s not just Joe it’s Frank as well. Last year his daugther who was around 50 gave up one of a kidney so 78 year old Frank could live on. Listen, you think the average father would allow this. Potentially compromising his daughter’s health at some point in the future at this stage of his life. Thirty years ago he would have died without ever receiving the heart transplant, he got 12 extra years and still that wasn’t enough.

      Torre revealed what he was all about the fall of 07 when he took the Dodger job deciding to pick up his family and move them across country because he still had the fire in his belly. Torre was 67 at the time without ever having spent even one summer with his 11 year old daughter. Think it might be time to spend a little quality time with the family, Joe? He never gave a thought to anyone but himself. Two former wives and families have little contact with Joe, that’s something I’d like to see Joe explain, I wonder if any of them felt betrayed by Joe.

      When Mel and Don Zimmer and Lee were all fired as coaches where was Joe, he ever stick his neck out for any of them, that was Joe. Wonder if any of them felt betrayed.

    6. JeremyM
      January 26th, 2009 | 11:01 pm

      Man, I’m as skeptical as anyone when it comes to Joe Torre, but questioning Frank Torre receiving a kidney from his daughter seems a little beyond the pale to me. We have no idea what went on with the decision making in that one, and it’s none of our business.

    7. January 26th, 2009 | 11:33 pm

      ~~Anybody still believe the spin that Cash is okay with this book? Given that he’s as thin-skinned as Joe, I sure don’t.~~

      I think once the book comes out, Cashman goes on the offensive within a week’s time. Unless he wants to try and hurt Torre’s book sales, by staying quiet, and trying to keep this out of the news.

    8. Evan3457
      January 27th, 2009 | 12:01 am

      I think once the book comes out, Cashman goes on the offensive within a week’s time. Unless he wants to try and hurt Torre’s book sales, by staying quiet, and trying to keep this out of the news.
      ================================
      If he defends his actions, trying to paint a fuller, possibly just as accurate (or moreso) a picture of events that happened, that’s no good; that’s going “on the offensive”.

      If he remains silent, “he’s hurting Torre’s sales” rather than trying not to make things worse.

      So, unless Cashman gives a favorable quote for the dust jacket of the 2nd edition of “The Yankee Years”, he’s dirt, is that the Kremlinology here?

      Maybe something along the lines of…”Yeah, Joe’s right; he’s always right. I shoulda fought for and saved his job again, just like I did after 2006. No, you know what, I shoulda threatened to quit if Joe didn’t come back. And I never shoulda questioned Joe batting A-Rod 8th, and stuff. And when Tino was going downhill, I never shoulda signed Giambi, I shoulda gotten a good all-around player like Doug Mientkiewicz for a year, and then gone with someone who was young and healthy, like Nick Johnson. I never shoulda signed Sheffield, even though George pulled that rock without giving me any say at all. I shoulda signed Carlos Beltran, even though Bernie was still there, and Joe still wanted him, and even though George demanded that all the money go into starting pitching after the 2004 collapse. And I never shoulda traded Soriano for the best player in baseball, because even though he’s won two MVP Awards for us, and saved Joe’s butt in the regular season of 2007, his playoff choke jobs mean he’s not worth it, and I should forseen all this and just kept Miguel Cairo at 3rd until Aaron Boone recovered from his torn-up knee. No, I shoulda signed all-around team-first guys like Joe wanted, you know, guys like Albert Belle and stuff. And I never shoulda fired Zimmer, even though he quit over a fight with George, and I never shoulda fired Stottlemyre, because he did such a great job with the pitchers, and Seattle did so well with the pitching since he went there, and Guidry, well Gator was just a pitching genius, and stuff.”

      Geez.

    9. MJ
      January 27th, 2009 | 9:07 am

      It took me almost two full days to really figure out where I stood on this. Now I know. Joe Torre — St. Joe to most of us for a dozen years — is a dishonorable individual. He’s petty, vindictive, and has no code of honor.

      Many people rip their employer or their immediate supervisor. Once, at a previous job, I told off my boss so bad that I made him nearly cry. So I can certainly understand why Torre would feel the need to vent about Cashman or the Steinbrenner family. But to write about the people you were managing? To write about your former players, most of whom made you look good while you sat there picking your nose? That’s a horrible thing to do.

      It may be petty on my part but it is my sincere hope that #6 is not retired. It is my sincere hope that Torre is not welcomed back to the Bronx anytime soon. It didn’t have to be this way but he has gone to the Verducci well one too many times for this to be forgiven.

      Joe Torre is dead to me. He makes me sick and I hope the players in Los Angeles pay close attention to what’s going on right now. If those guys trust Joe, they’ll get burned. Here’s hoping that the Dodgers implode and Joe gets his ass fired and begging for work.

      Low-life.

    10. YankCrank
      January 27th, 2009 | 9:24 am

      MJ…think you may be overreacting just a tad?

    11. MJ
      January 27th, 2009 | 9:31 am

      MJ…think you may be overreacting just a tad?
      —————–
      Personally, no, I don’t think so. I think Torre deserves all the crap and venom he’ll get for this. He breached a code in my opinion.

      You’re entitled to your opinion, however.

    12. YankCrank
      January 27th, 2009 | 9:39 am

      Personally, no, I don’t think so. I think Torre deserves all the crap and venom he’ll get for this. He breached a code in my opinion.
      You’re entitled to your opinion, however.
      —–

      That’s ok, a lot of people feel that way and honestly, I completely understand and respect everybody who comes to that conclusion.

      Personally, I feel the article he and Verducci did on A-Rod as “The Lonely Yankee” was an extremely petty and low thing to do. I feel that was much worst than whatever we’ve read so far in this book. It looks like Torre exchanged a couple juicy details for a couple million, and even though he’s free to write a book if he likes, it still sucks that this stuff came out in the manner it did.

      I guess what i’m saying is, I agree with all of your points other than the “Joe Toree is dead to me and makes me sick” argument. I’ll always love him for what he accomplished in New York and what he did to make the Yankees a meaningful franchise again. To me, a tell-all book doesn’t change that feeling.

    13. Raf
      January 27th, 2009 | 9:54 am

      But to write about the people you were managing? To write about your former players, most of whom made you look good while you sat there picking your nose? That’s a horrible thing to do.
      ——————
      He did it in his first book, why should we be surprised if he did it in his second book?

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