• Former Yank Sheffield Released By Tigers

    Posted by on March 31st, 2009 · Comments (24)

    The AP has the story. By the way, it’s March 31st. Do you know where your Humberto Sanchez is?

    Comments on Former Yank Sheffield Released By Tigers

    1. MJ
      March 31st, 2009 | 12:49 pm

      By the way, it’s March 31st. Do you know where your Humberto Sanchez is?
      —–
      Yep, that Cashman sure does suck! He turned a then-38 year-old OF/DH with no position or role on the team into three pitchers.

      The three pitchers (Sanchez, Claggett, Whelan) never have to sniff the majors for that trade to still have been a great move. The Yanks got rid of a player they didn’t want or need and got players in return.

      Believe it or not, good teams have pitching depth in the minors and the Yanks are — thanks to Brian Cashman — no exception in this respect. A minor league system isn’t only a “good” one if it only has A- and B-level prospects. There’s something to be said for having arms like those three kids the team got back from Detroit because you never know when you can trade them for something else.

      I seriously can’t figure out why you’d bash Cashman for the Sheffied trade.

    2. March 31st, 2009 | 1:04 pm

      By the way, it’s March 31st. Do you know where your Humberto Sanchez is?
      ======================
      Still employed by a baseball team, I believe.

      MJ’s right. Complaining about this move makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

    3. Pat F
      March 31st, 2009 | 1:07 pm

      very well said MJ.

    4. March 31st, 2009 | 1:16 pm

      I don’t usually like to be this intrusive, but I just wrote a post yesterday updating everyone on Humberto.

      Seems like he just can’t stay healthy.

    5. March 31st, 2009 | 1:20 pm

      Hey, the Tigers got a decent 2007 from Sheff out of that deal. And, what did the Yankees get? Not much at all. That’s all I’m saying.

      Is that complaining, or stating a fact?

    6. butchie22
      March 31st, 2009 | 1:23 pm

      MJ wrote:

      By the way, it’s March 31st. Do you know where your Humberto Sanchez is?
      —–
      Yep, that Cashman sure does suck! He turned a then-38 year-old OF/DH with no position or role on the team into three pitchers.
      The three pitchers (Sanchez, Claggett, Whelan) never have to sniff the majors for that trade to still have been a great move. The Yanks got rid of a player they didn’t want or need and got players in return.
      Believe it or not, good teams have pitching depth in the minors and the Yanks are — thanks to Brian Cashman — no exception in this respect. A minor league system isn’t only a “good” one if it only has A- and B-level prospects. There’s something to be said for having arms like those three kids the team got back from Detroit because you never know when you can trade them for something else.
      I seriously can’t figure out why you’d bash Cashman for the Sheffied trade.

      I understand Steve’s point though. Where is Umberto? Is he ready to contribute to the big team any time, soon? Or was this just another Cash Man trade that ends up in nichts, nada, niente, rien, zilch ,zero again? I remember that because Sheff was such an asshole wanting to being traded to the Tigers, Cash Man had no choice ?…that’s BS because Sheff had no no-trade clause. I really don’t care about what happens to Sheff and how he acted on another team, he had no right to be obliged by the Yankees.I will say this much, despite all of that it was somewhat smart of Cash Man and Co to pick up Sheff’s option only BUT to trade him even though it was not done under optimum circumstances. But knowing how weak Cash Man comes to bringing any type of pitching here, what are the end results. Before anybody gets smart and mentions Joba, I could spit back the failed Hughes /Kennedy experiment….and that is only one example. With the Sheff trade, I would love to see these kids do something for the big league team, BUT until I do I’ll remain skeptical because Cash Man’s hand was involved. I understand where Steve’s criticisms come from…..this team has diminished since 2000 and have not fufilled their mission statement since then. Add insult to injury, they didn’t make the playoffs last year. And because of that they committed over 425 million to 3 players!??! two of them pitchers BTW. That was the aftermath of the failed Hughes/ Kennedy experiment.

    7. March 31st, 2009 | 1:28 pm

      Why not take a flyer on Sheff and let him play third until Gay-Rod returns?

    8. YankCrank
      March 31st, 2009 | 1:45 pm

      Hey, the Tigers got a decent 2007 from Sheff out of that deal. And, what did the Yankees get? Not much at all. That’s all I’m saying.

      Is that complaining, or stating a fact?
      —–

      How about Sanchez, Claggett and Whelan are young and still have a chance to either be a productive Yankee pitcher or be traded for another player that may be useful? If all three turn into busts than yeah, call this trade a push. But right now, they have a value.

    9. MJ
      March 31st, 2009 | 1:55 pm

      Hey, the Tigers got a decent 2007 from Sheff out of that deal. And, what did the Yankees get? Not much at all. That’s all I’m saying.
      ——–
      But since the Yanks had nowhere for Sheffield to play in 2007, the fact that he had a decent 2007 for the Tigers is ultimately irrelevant. The Yanks took something they didn’t want or need and turned it into pitching depth at a time when their minor league system didn’t have any.

      Anyway, think of the alternatives:

      1. Not picking up his option and letting him walk away for nothing; or

      2. Keeping him on the team and trying to find enough AB’s for him, Matsui, Giambi, Abreu and Damon (the 2007 everyday DH, LF, RF, and 1B).

      Neither scenario seems that appealing to me so getting three young arms seems like the best route to have taken.

    10. bfriley76
      March 31st, 2009 | 2:00 pm

      Hey, the Tigers got a decent 2007 from Sheff out of that deal. And, what did the Yankees get?

      Three prospects that may or may not pan out, and the honor of not paying him $41 million for a combined .247 avg 132 RBI and 36 HRs over the course of two seasons.

    11. Evan3457
      April 1st, 2009 | 1:59 am

      Sorry, but the Yanks did the right thing in trading Sheffield when they did.

      He gave the Tigers one good season; he’d have given the Yankees nothing but one big headache.
      A-Rod already handles that department.

      Even if Sanchez is a bust, they may still get a decent reliever out of Claggett.

    12. McMillan
      October 27th, 2013 | 9:20 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Sorry, but the Yanks did the right thing in trading Sheffield when they did.

      @ Evan3457:
      Dombrowski “killed” Cashman “again” in this trade (as he would a third time in Dec., 2009); Sanchez was a bust, and the team did not get a decent reliever out of Claggett. The Yanks did the wrong thing in trading Sheffield for Sanchez, Whelan, and Claggett.

      Sorry.

    13. MJ Recanati
      October 29th, 2013 | 11:57 am

      Ricketson wrote:

      Dombrowski “killed” Cashman “again” in this trade (as he would a third time in Dec., 2009); Sanchez was a bust, and the team did not get a decent reliever out of Claggett. The Yanks did the wrong thing in trading Sheffield for Sanchez, Whelan, and Claggett.
      Sorry.

      Gary Sheffield earned $38.2M in the three years after he was traded. In that same time period he was worth 1.03 bWAR/season above replacement. At appoximately $5M per win, Sheffield was paid nearly double what he was worth.

      By just getting rid of a player the Yankees had no room for and getting a team to send players in return made it a successful trade. The Tigers paid him $24.2M for $14M worth of replacement value, or got about -10,242,377 worth of value out of Sheffield.

    14. Sweet Lou
      October 29th, 2013 | 2:29 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      By just getting rid of a player the Yankees had no room for and getting a team to send players in return made it a successful trade.

      Right. And Cashman’s 2012-13 “winter program” was a success as well.

      “… In November 2006, desperate to [move Sheffield], [Cashman believed he] might be getting from Detroit a closer of the future in Sanchez and two other useful bullpen pieces in Claggett and Whelan.

      It marked the second time Cashman had done high-level business with Dombrowski for three prospects and the second time Cashman struck out. In February 1999 — in a trade Cashman very much favored — Lowell was dealt to Florida for Yarnall, Noel and Johnson. Yarnall and Noel, in particular, were craved by [Cashman].

      … Cashman also was a motivating factor in a three-way trade that included Dombrowski’s Tigers in July 2002 in which he surrendered Ted Lilly and two prospects for Jeff Weaver, who failed as a Yankee.”

    15. Kamieniecki
      October 29th, 2013 | 4:51 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Gary Sheffield earned $38.2M in the three years after he was traded. In that same time period he was worth 1.03 bWAR/season above replacement. At appoximately $5M per win, Sheffield was paid nearly double what he was worth.
      By just getting rid of a player the Yankees had no room for and getting a team to send players in return made it a successful trade. The Tigers paid him $24.2M for $14M worth of replacement value, or got about -10,242,377 worth of value out of Sheffield.

      In terms of Cashman’s track record, the trade can be considered a resounding success; otherwise, a third-tier G.M. would have gotten something for Sheffield.

    16. Evan3457
      October 29th, 2013 | 5:01 pm

      Keep flailing, chump.

    17. Mr. October
      October 29th, 2013 | 6:08 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Gary Sheffield earned $38.2M in the three years after he was traded. In that same time period he was worth 1.03 bWAR/season above replacement. At appoximately $5M per win, Sheffield was paid nearly double what he was worth.
      By just getting rid of a player the Yankees had no room for and getting a team to send players in return made it a successful trade. The Tigers paid him $24.2M for $14M worth of replacement value, or got about -10,242,377 worth of value out of Sheffield.

      This is moronic.

      By just getting rid of a player the Yankees had no room for? It was the Yankees who exercised an option that prevented Sheffield from becoming a free agent in 2006 in the first place.

      Once that option was exercised, Sheffield was traded to Detroit for three propsects, none of which worked out – AND there were other teams interested in Sheffield at the time.

      Finally, Sheffield suffered several injuries in Detroit after the trade.

      So, Cashman signed a player the team had no room for with an intention of trading that player, and traded that player for three prospects whom did not pan out at all – at least one of which had a questionable history of arm problems, and instead of to other teams that were interested.

      And any analysis of Sheffield’s value is compromised by a least one major injury Sheffield sustained well into his first season in Detroit and AFTER the trade.

      This was not a case of the Yankees trading an outfielder with three years left on his contract, at the age of 38, to a team for three prospects none of whom had a history of arm problems, and the outfielder having 3 poors seasons without injury, and the three prospects not working out, and with no other teams interested in the outfielder.

      Cashman made a decision to exercise a contract option rather than let Sheffield go for nothing, and then he let Sheffield go for nothing.

      Three blind mice:
      @ MJ Recanati
      @ Evan3457
      @ Raf

      Moronic.

      The speculation at the time was that Boston was interested in Sheffield as a free agent. Either let Boston or some other team sign Sheffield as a free agent, or get something for him if you exercise a contract option.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Sorry, but the Yanks did the right thing in trading Sheffield when they did.

      “Trading him when they did?” You mean within hours of exercising an option on him? Yeah, it’s a good thing they did that; otherwise Sheffield might have signed with Boston and Cashman would not have had Sanchez, Whelan, and Claggett.

    18. Sweet Lou
      October 29th, 2013 | 10:52 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Gary Sheffield earned $38.2M in the three years after he was traded. In that same time period he was worth 1.03 bWAR/season above replacement. At appoximately $5M per win, Sheffield was paid nearly double what he was worth.

      By just getting rid of a player the Yankees had no room for and getting a team to send players in return made it a successful trade. The Tigers paid him $24.2M for $14M worth of replacement value, or got about -10,242,377 worth of value out of Sheffield.

      Sheffield was signed to a two-year contract extension by Detroit.

      And Sheffield injured his shoulder in an outfield collision in late July, 2007, and was hitting .306 with 23 HRs and 65 RBIs. After the injury, he hit only .172 with 2 HRs and 10 RBIs.

      @ MJ Recanati:
      I don’t see how this “WAR” analysis makes any sense; unless you believe the Steve Kemp free agent signing in 1983 was a bad move because Kemp was injured in a collision at the outset of the 1983 season.

      Kemp was never the same player again, and was subsequently traded to Pittsburgh for a prospect named Jay Buhner. When has Cashman made a trade of the quality of Steve Kemp-for-Jay Buhner?

      Nice try.

    19. McMillan
      October 29th, 2013 | 11:21 pm

      @ Mr. October:
      @ Sweet Lou:
      Stop trying to make sense!

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      By just getting rid of a player the Yankees had no room for and getting a team to send players in return made it a successful trade.

      And if Cashman had convinced Dombrowski to send four pitchers that sucked instead of three pitchers that sucked, the trade would have been that much more successful.

    20. Kamieniecki
      October 29th, 2013 | 11:48 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Sorry, but the Yanks did the right thing in trading Sheffield when they did. He gave the Tigers one good season…

      He gave the Tigers one tremendous, All-Star calibre season – until he suffered an injury to his shoulder that required offseason surgery to repair, and caused problems for him into the 2008 season. Wrong again.

    21. Evan3457
      October 30th, 2013 | 1:57 am

      Keep flailing, chump.

      It’s really funny to watch.

    22. MJ Recanati
      October 30th, 2013 | 8:56 am

      Evan3457 wrote:

      It’s really funny to watch.

      You know what else is pretty funny? The same person, logging in to post six dfferent responses from four different screen-names. In real life, four different personalities living within one person might be schizophrenia. Over the internet, it’s just simple trolling.

      I wonder why the troll didn’t also sign on as Ricketson or PHMDen. I mean, is it that much more work to sign in as six different people versus four?

    23. Sweet Lou
      October 30th, 2013 | 3:08 pm

      MJ Recanate wrote:

      By just getting rid of a player the Yankees had no room for and getting a team to send players in return made it a successful trade.

      Same absurdist/nonsensical excuse as the one offered for the Lowell trade.

    24. Mr. October
      October 30th, 2013 | 3:45 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Gary Sheffield earned $38.2M in the three years after he was traded. In that same time period he was worth 1.03 bWAR/season above replacement. At appoximately $5M per win, Sheffield was paid nearly double what he was worth.
      By just getting rid of a player the Yankees had no room for and getting a team to send players in return made it a successful trade. The Tigers paid him $24.2M for $14M worth of replacement value, or got about -10,242,377 worth of value out of Sheffield.

      @ MJ Recanati:
      “$10,242,377.00 worth of value” – What was Sheffield paid in terms of his worth up until July 21, 2007? Do you have that number? No. Right? Maybe Raf Kramden can look that one up.

      Do you think Detroit might have had insurance for Sheffield’s injury?

      And what happened to Brian Cashman’s crystal ball?

      The crystal ball that informed Cashman that Sheffield would suffer a labrum tear in an outfield collision in 2007 while putting up numbers worthy of A.L. Most Valuable Player Award consideration (i.e. .306 avg.; 38 HRs; 107 RBIs) – for a team that defeated the Yankees in the LDS the year before?

      What happened to that crystal ball? Did Cashman drop it? After only one use?

      Cashman received nothing for a player whom Detroit was willing to pay $41 million for 2007-09, or a player there was a substantial market for as of Nov., 2006: the Angels, Orioles, Cubs, Giants, Astros, and Rangers all expressed an interest in Sheffield, and the Indians, White Sox, and Mets were also rumored to have had interest as well.

      Sweet Lou wrote:

      Same absurdist/nonsensical excuse as the one offered for the Lowell trade.

      Yep. Yarnell, Noel, Johnson, Sanchez, Whelan, and Claggett for Mike Lowell and Gary Sheffield.

      These were great moves by Cashman, because he got six players that produced nothing at the Major League level for two players named Lowell and Sheffield; a lesser G.M. would have gotten only five. Wile E. Cashman, Super Genius.