• Some Yankee Stadium Math

    Posted by on April 22nd, 2009 · Comments (12)

    48,271
    45,101
    45,167
    43,068
    42,065

    Those are the attendance totals for the 2009 Yankees first five official home games in the new Yankee Stadium. Last season, in the old Yankee Stadium, the team’s attendance for the their first five home games was:

    55,112
    48,544
    47,785
    49,255
    52,247

    So, here’s the difference, from last year to this year, per game:

    -6,841
    -3,443
    -2,618
    -6,187
    -10,182

    That’s an average of 5,854 less fans per game.

    Now, reportedly, old Yankee Stadium (in 2008) had a capacity of 56,936 whereas the new Yankee Stadium has a “seating capacity” of 51,000. That’s a difference of 5,936 between what the old Stadium could hold and what the new Stadium can seat.

    Isn’t that capacity difference of 5,936 close to the average 5,854 less fans showing up in 2009? Betcha that’s what Lonn Trost keeps telling the Steinbrenner Brothers…

    I can just see it now…

    Comments on Some Yankee Stadium Math

    1. Tresh Fan
      April 22nd, 2009 | 1:37 am

      FWIW, attendance is down nearly 7% across the board in MLB, and as far as attendance at a plush new ballpark, how do these numbers grab you?

      Opening Day—52,613
      Game 2——–26,881
      Game 3——–25,330
      Game 4——–20,337
      Game 5——–19,616

      These are the attendance figures for the first 5 games at the old New Yankee Stadium in 1976. Interesting, eh? I remember driving down to the Stadium with my friends, getting there about a half hour before game time, and buying field level tickets just a few rows back at the booth.

    2. thenewguy
      April 22nd, 2009 | 1:55 am

      FWIW, attendance is down nearly 7% across the board in MLB
      ——————

      I think people forget that there is an economic downturn when they are talking about new Yankee Stadium. If we weren’t in a recession, is there any doubt these seats would sell? I’m sure the Yankees built the stadium without the recession in mind, and are truly not too worried about it. Since numbers across the board are down, I can’t imagine the Yankees are in an especially bad situation because they built an expensive new ballpark that costs a lot to go to.

    3. April 22nd, 2009 | 8:23 am

      Wait till you see this afternoon’s number.

      You’d think that the hoopla surrounding the new Stadium would offset a 7% downtown in parks across MLB.

      You’d think that, of course, if the Yankees didn’t sell out (sorry, bad term) a lot of their longtime customers in favor of wealthy suckers.

      The Yankees left a bad taste in people’s mouths with their impersonal, take-it-or-leave-it relocation process, and now it’s biting them in the ass. Good.

    4. YankCrank
      April 22nd, 2009 | 9:27 am

      The Yankees left a bad taste in people’s mouths with their impersonal, take-it-or-leave-it relocation process, and now it’s biting them in the ass. Good.
      —–

      I’m not a season-ticket holder, nor was I so I don’t have a personal vendetta towards the Yanks like most people do who had to go through this difficult process. However, I read a lot of stories about it and I don’t really see the outrage that most fans do. It’s a new park with fewer seats, the decks are of different sizes and it would be next to impossible to fully accommodate everybody.

      Would I be pissed if I had field level seats and was relocated to the upper deck? Hell yeah, but I also wouldn’t have been surprised about it. Ticket holders had to have seen this coming, right?

    5. Tresh Fan
      April 22nd, 2009 | 10:41 am

      “[T]here is a simple reason why the Yankees have never drawn 3 million fans: their ticket prices are too high.”
      -Dean Chadwin, THOSE DAMN YANKEES (1999)

      The ink was barely dry on the page when the Yankees broke the 3 million barrier—even with overpriced seats. The prices continued to rise throughout the next decade and, within five or six years, the Yankees were easily drawing over 4 million fans. Whatever correlation exists between ticket prices and attendance is tenuous at best.

    6. Raf
      April 22nd, 2009 | 10:47 am

      I’m not a season-ticket holder, nor was I so I don’t have a personal vendetta towards the Yanks like most people do who had to go through this difficult process.
      ——————-
      Same here, I’ve heard enough on both sides to think that maybe it hasn’t been as bad as initially presented.

    7. bfriley76
      April 22nd, 2009 | 11:13 am

      My brother gets a ticket package every year in the upper deck. He was able to transfer the seats to the new stadium and his package was actually cheaper this year than last year. He’s probably an exception, but not everyone is angry about the process.

    8. MJ
      April 22nd, 2009 | 12:00 pm

      Tresh Fan wrote:

      “[T]here is a simple reason why the Yankees have never drawn 3 million fans: their ticket prices are too high.”
      -Dean Chadwin, THOSE DAMN YANKEES (1999)
      The ink was barely dry on the page when the Yankees broke the 3 million barrier—even with overpriced seats. The prices continued to rise throughout the next decade and, within five or six years, the Yankees were easily drawing over 4 million fans. Whatever correlation exists between ticket prices and attendance is tenuous at best.

      TreshFan, good research! I agree completely, by the way.

    9. Evan3457
      April 22nd, 2009 | 12:21 pm

      The prices continued to rise throughout the next decade and, within five or six years, the Yankees were easily drawing over 4 million fans. Whatever correlation exists between ticket prices and attendance is tenuous at best.

      Up to a point this is true. However, difference in number eventually becomes difference in kind. You not mind being required to work an extra hour of paid overtime each day, but I’d bet you’d scream bloody murder if you were required to work an extra 8 hours of paid overtime every day.

      Similarly, if the Yanks have been increasing ticket prices 10% per year for a decade, then that would cause ticket prices to rise by 150% over the decade. Now, if you do that over 10 years, the frog in the pot may not notice it’s being boiled to death, one degree at a time.

      But if all of the sudden, you raise ticket prices by 70% in one year, especially AFTER the 150% rise over the last 10 yeas, and your have a decline in income, or more precisely, fewer people and businesses who have that level of income available, you sure as heck are going to lose ticket buying customers. The frog in the pot is going to notice the temperature jumping 100 degrees instantaneously, especially if you take his air conditioner away from him at the same time (Well, the frog is already electrocuted in that case, but you get the metaphor.)

      A 2nd case in point. People always used to say the demand for gasoline was inelastic; people have to go to work, people have to shop, people have take their kids to little league, and soccer league, and to fast food places. But when the price of gas spiked, all of a sudden, people found ways to use less gas. So much so, in fact, that it created a suply surplus so severe that the price of crude dropped 75% in about a year.

      ====================================
      I mean, LOOK at the seats. The corresponding seats in the main and field levels boxes were NEVER empty like that in the old park. Now they are. So are you going to believe economic theories compiled under the old prices, or your lying eyes?

    10. butchie22
      April 22nd, 2009 | 12:27 pm

      Tresh Fan wrote:

      “[T]here is a simple reason why the Yankees have never drawn 3 million fans: their ticket prices are too high.”
      -Dean Chadwin, THOSE DAMN YANKEES (1999)
      The ink was barely dry on the page when the Yankees broke the 3 million barrier—even with overpriced seats. The prices continued to rise throughout the next decade and, within five or six years, the Yankees were easily drawing over 4 million fans. Whatever correlation exists between ticket prices and attendance is tenuous at best.

      Tresh it was a simple case of the Yankees providing a superior product(and winning consistently) to the Mets and the fanbase swelled as did attendance regardless of the prices. In this climate, the prices have risen so dramatically , the economy is arguably the worst one in the last 40 odd years AND that has effected ticket prices.THENEWGUY go it right on this one.

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