• Sandomir: Yanks Tkts Move Made To Quiet Critics & Pretty-Up T.V.

    Posted by on April 29th, 2009 · Comments (11)

    Via Richard Sandomir -

    Why not cut more ticket prices at Yankee Stadium, not just the really expensive ones?

    The Yankees’ move Tuesday to slash the price of slower-selling premium seats, including the $2,500 perches, and give away others affects a few hundred seats. It was a cosmetic move to quell criticism and put more bodies in front of television cameras.

    There are only 100 seats priced for season-ticket plans at $2,500 — and only 55 to 60 have been sold.

    The Yankees’ strategy exacerbates the visible divide between fans in exclusive areas and the tens of thousands outside of club access. The Yankees gave discounts to those who can afford $325 to $2,500 tickets for 81 games, but nothing to fans who might have had to stretch family budgets pinched by the recession to pay $50, $75 or $150 a game.

    Those fans — many of whom could once afford box seats — deserve something.

    There is nothing wrong with treating your highest-paying customers well. Anyone with a full season of $2,500 seats is paying $202,500 this year. That is a real commitment.

    But by rewarding only the wealthiest, the Yankees might be inviting some sort of class conflict.

    “I won’t predict that this will cause pitchfork riots at the stadium, but it will intensify resentment,” said Todd Gitlin, a professor of journalism and sociology at Columbia University. “The people getting cut-rate deals are in the position of the bonus-getters from A.I.G. or the banks, and people could say, ‘How come these guys get a privilege when I’ve lost my job?’ ”

    Amen.

    Comments on Sandomir: Yanks Tkts Move Made To Quiet Critics & Pretty-Up T.V.

    1. yagottagotomo1
      April 29th, 2009 | 10:46 pm

      Once again, so what? They sold the other tickets- they didnt make anyone pay for them- people decided they wanted to stretch the budget to get them. Let me tell you a little story. In 2006, I had season tickets, 46 game package in the upper deck, that I split with someone. My partner didnt want to renew and I couldnt find someone else. Im a die hard fan, desperate to go to games, but I didnt renew because I could not afford it. I have little sympathy for people who bought tickets in this economic market and now want a discount.

    2. April 29th, 2009 | 10:50 pm

      yagottagotomo1 wrote:

      Once again, so what?

      I believe Mr. Sandomir said it best:

      The Yankees’ strategy exacerbates the visible divide between fans in exclusive areas and the tens of thousands outside of club access. The Yankees gave discounts to those who can afford $325 to $2,500 tickets for 81 games, but nothing to fans who might have had to stretch family budgets pinched by the recession to pay $50, $75 or $150 a game.

      Or, are you ignoring that part?

    3. yagottagotomo1
      April 29th, 2009 | 10:52 pm

      Umm, no I addressed that directly. The Yankees didnt give discounts to anybody- they couldnt sell the seats and it looked bad, so they lowered the prices to sell the seats. They have no obligation to people who were foolish enough to stretch the family budget, and I have no sympathy. The economy was in the toilet when these people purchased a major luxury item.

    4. Evan3457
      April 29th, 2009 | 10:59 pm

      I dunno, guys. I found main tickets available for some nice game. In the rear of Main Infield, actually, that weren’t available before.

      They were $125 each, but that’s just on the edge of my budget.

      So I benefitted somehow from all this, as when I tried earlier in the year, ticketmaster told me they were unavailable.

    5. yagottagotomo1
      April 29th, 2009 | 11:00 pm

      But Evan, do you have a trust fund? Are you are a corporation? How could you have benefited???????

    6. Raf
      April 29th, 2009 | 11:11 pm

      The Yankees’ strategy exacerbates the visible divide between fans in exclusive areas and the tens of thousands outside of club access. The Yankees gave discounts to those who can afford $325 to $2,500 tickets for 81 games, but nothing to fans who might have had to stretch family budgets pinched by the recession to pay $50, $75 or $150 a game.
      —————-
      It’s not about the “little guy” it never was about the little guy, it hasn’t been about him for a long time.

      If budget stretching fans don’t want to pay exorbitant prices, I suggest they sit in the upper deck or in the bleachers. Or at the very least get their priorities in order. Push comes to shove, if I’m pinching pennies, going to a ballgame is quite low on the priority list. But of course, YMMV

    7. Evan3457
      April 29th, 2009 | 11:19 pm

      yagotta:

      I used to go to about 15-20 games a year back in the early 90′s, when Main Reserved were $10, and field boxes were, I dunno, $15, $16? I could park, and eat a ballpark dinner (2 dogs, a pretzel, a large soda) for $30-$40, altogether.

      So I’m a little sad that tickets of similar vantage point go for 8-10 times more than they did, when my income has roughly tripled in that time.

      So now, if I feel like I want to spend the money, I’ll be able to go to 5-8 games for the same price that 15-20 used to cost. Of course, demand for tickets was much lower then, so I understand the supply/demand curve aspect.

      As I say, it’s sad, but not tragic. Certainly nothing to start a revolution over.

      P.S. I’m still gonna take my nephews to a game this year. They’re 12 and 10; it’s about time ;)

    8. yagottagotomo1
      April 29th, 2009 | 11:20 pm

      Well, that’s one of the costs of the team getting so good, unfortunately.

    9. clintfsu813
      April 30th, 2009 | 8:05 am

      Yea..the closest team to me is the Rays..with their record right now and low attendance, they’re trying to give away seats.

    10. MJ
      April 30th, 2009 | 9:11 am

      “I won’t predict that this will cause pitchfork riots at the stadium, but it will intensify resentment,” said Todd Gitlin, a professor of journalism and sociology at Columbia University. “The people getting cut-rate deals are in the position of the bonus-getters from A.I.G. or the banks, and people could say, ‘How come these guys get a privilege when I’ve lost my job?’ ”
      ———
      I love it when newspapers take up the populist cause and drop hot-button names like “AIG” knowing full well what that name connotes, even if it’s entirely irrelevant in the current conversation.

      Here’s the basic point: if the “$50, $75 or $150″ seats are selling robustly, and by all accounts those sections of the stadium appeared full, why would the Yanks discount what seems to have been appropriately priced? The Yanks discounted seats that weren’t selling. That it “benefits” the wealthy is irrelevant. It’s not about WHO it helps, it’s about the impetus for the price decrease. The Yanks had unsold inventory and are now trying to sell it at a better price, relative to the market.

      Why is this so hard to understand? Why does class warfare and populism have to enter the equation. If the non-premium seats weren’t selling, I’m sure the Yanks would do whatever they had to do in order to remedy that situation as well. Even if the Yanks will never be an altruistic enterprise (and why should they be, after all?), they are nevertheless governed by the law of supply and demand.

      Stop the madness!

    11. Raf
      April 30th, 2009 | 9:58 am

      Why is this so hard to understand? Why does class warfare and populism have to enter the equation.
      ———–
      Because people are sheep and will think emotionally instead of rationally?

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