• Is The ‘Pen The Best Thing For Joba?

    Posted by on October 8th, 2009 · Comments (5)

    Bob Brenly had this gem during the 2nd inning of Game 2 of the Dodgers-Cardinals ALDS:

    [Adam Wainright] really speaks highly of the experience he had closing for the Cardinals back then [2006]. He says he takes the same mentality into his start. He said early in his career he tried to pace himself too much, trying to work deep into the ballgame; but his experience that he had in the bullpen where you just go after every hitter and every out is huge; he’s taken that same mentality to the mound as a starting pitcher.

    Sound like someone we know? Maybe he’ll be better than a set-up man after all? Maybe all that hoopla about Joba’s mound celebration’s being too wild has caused Joba to change his pitching mentality while starting? Perhaps putting him back in the ‘pen for the playoffs is the best thing for his starting career moving into 2010.

    - Posted By Corey

    Comments on Is The ‘Pen The Best Thing For Joba?

    1. ken
      October 8th, 2009 | 8:25 pm

      I think that we are all forgetting how young and early in his career is Joba. It may take another year or two to find out exactly what kind of pitcher he is and what role he is best suited to pitch.

    2. Evan3457
      October 8th, 2009 | 8:28 pm

      If he can wrap his head around a starting pitcher’s role, and come out attacking in every start the way he did that start against the Red Sox in the last series at home, he can be top of the rotation starter. The pitches are there, but is his head/heart in it.

      If Clemens wasn’t a pariah, I’d have Roger talk to him about taking his job more seriously, the way he did for Schilling long ago. Schilling credits that talk with turning his career around.

      I don’t think I’d be sending Joba to the same Clemens-run training program that Pettitte took, though.

    3. MJ
      October 8th, 2009 | 9:46 pm

      In my honest opinion, the best thing that happened to Clay Buchholz was being banished to AAA last year and being forgotten down there this year while the Red Sox worked on the Penny/Smoltz experiment. When they finally cut bait on the vets and brought Buchholz back up, he had truly learned how to fail, how to succeed, and how to pitch.

      The Yanks didn’t have the same luxury this year and were thus forced to have #62 work out his kinks in the very public arena of the major leagues. A trip to Scranton would’ve done him a lot of good if the Yanks could’ve afforded him that chance. That’s where Wang’s injury really comes back to bite us…

      Separately, the idiotic implementation of Joba Rules v2.0 did him absolutely no favors. Cashman’s execution of that plan was a complete failure in my opinion.

    4. October 8th, 2009 | 10:21 pm

      [Adam Wainright] really speaks highly of the experience he had closing for the Cardinals back then [2006]. He says he takes the same mentality into his start.

      Let’s hope Phil Hughes is saying this too…IF they have him in the rotation next year (which, I don’t think is a lock anymore…given how he’s taken to the pen).

    5. MJ
      October 8th, 2009 | 10:24 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      IF they have him in the rotation next year (which, I don’t think is a lock anymore…given how he’s taken to the pen)

      The Yanks would be profoundly stupid to shelve Hughes’s career as a starter before they even gave him a chance. To re-live the Joba debate with Phil would be madness.

      Everyone that profiled as a starting pitcher in the minors — EVERYONE — deserves to earn a chance for the MLB rotation until proven otherwise.

      The only key is for the Yanks to not implement those horrible Joba Rules with Phil.

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.