• Yanks Court Aroldis Chapman

    Posted by on October 26th, 2009 · Comments (12)

    Via Jon Heyman -

    Cuban defector Aroldis Chapman will be at ALCS Game 6 at Yankee Stadium as a guest of the Yankees, sources said.

    The invitation is a not-do-subtle way of gaining an advantage in talks for the talented left-handed pitcher. Word is that Chapman is seeking a deal worth $40-60 million, and the Yankees and Red Sox could be gearing up for a battle.

    The Cubs, Blue Jays, Rangers, Mets, Orioles and White Sox also have been mentioned as having interest.

    But that’s a lot of money to pay for a pitcher who’s unproven as a big leaguer, and only the Yankees and Red Sox have a history of taking such a plunge (Boston paid $103 million for Daisuke Matsuzaka; the Yankees $32 million for Jose Contreras).

    A few weeks back, I read this from Jim Callis on Chapman:

    I won’t be surprised if Chapman gets three times as much as Stephen Strasburg’s draft-record $15.1 million contract. He’s a 22-year-old lefthander with a fastball clocked at 100 mph at the World Baseball Classic, and he’s on the open market—a potent combination. As one scout who saw him at the WBC said, “If you are looking for more than that in a pitcher, you’ll be searching your whole life.”

    But here’s the kicker: Chapman never has dominated Cuba’s Serie Nacional. He’s much more of a thrower than a pitcher. Most of Cuban defectors haven’t lived up to their hype, and the last Cuban pitcher to attract this kind of fanfare was Jose Contreras. Contreras has three good seasons and a solid 71-63, 4.63 career, but expectations were that he’d deliver a lot more after signing a $32 million contract with the Yankees.

    So, there you have it. In a way, Aroldis Chapman is the Cuban Andrew Brackman. So, I’m sure that Brian Cashman will break the bank to obtain him for the Yankees.

    Comments on Yanks Court Aroldis Chapman

    1. Evan3457
      October 27th, 2009 | 12:21 am

      I don’t think he needs to break the bank…instead, he could use some of the credit he’s earned by being the GM of the newly-crowned AL champs, can’t he?

    2. Scout
      October 27th, 2009 | 8:11 am

      Chapman strikes me as another of those black holes into which teams throw vast sums of money with little certainty of return. For the kind of money we are talking about here, I would much rather invest it in signing a John Lackey to deepen the starting rotation or a Matt Holiday to solidify the outfield. (And, yes, I do know that those moves have luxury tax implications that signing Chapman would not.) On the other hand, in a bleak economy, teams may be far less willing to spend on Chapman than some of the predicitons we have seen.

    3. YankCrank
      October 27th, 2009 | 9:52 am

      Honestly, who cares if Cashman breaks the bank on him and he busts? It’s well worth the risk and all it costs the Yankees is money.

      I still don’t get why taking a risk on International free agents is seen as a bad move for Brian Cashman? Best case scenario the guy is a beast, worst case he’s got the skill set of Drew Henson and all it costs us is money.

      We’re not the Oakland A’s here, I encourage Cash to use our resources and take a risk.

    4. October 27th, 2009 | 10:13 am

      YankCrank wrote:

      Honestly, who cares if Cashman breaks the bank on him and he busts?

      Like Kei Igawa? Betcha Cashman would care. How many of those can a GM afford on his resume?

    5. G.I. Joey
      October 27th, 2009 | 10:23 am

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      YankCrank wrote:
      Honestly, who cares if Cashman breaks the bank on him and he busts?
      Like Kei Igawa? Betcha Cashman would care. How many of those can a GM afford on his resume?

      I don’t know how many of those a GM can afford on his resume, but the franchise certainly can. Taking chances on guys like this and banishing them (like Igawa) is something that ONLY the Yankees have the ability to do.

    6. YankCrank
      October 27th, 2009 | 10:32 am

      @ Steve Lombardi:

      Yanks have the resources to take those chances and get absolutely nothing in return. Why not exploit it before the rules inevitably change?

    7. Scout
      October 27th, 2009 | 1:36 pm

      This notion that the Yankees have infinite resources is nonsense. As Cashman has explained (and no one has ever contradicted his account), he had to persuade the Yankee hierarchy to exceed the budget last winter to sign Tex. In this economy and with attendance at the stadium below what the Yankees expected, it is foolish to believe the team does not operate under real budget constraints. These constraints may be looser than those for other teams, but they exist. Take note of the fact that the team passed on a couple of promising pitching prospects it drafted this summer over a difference of a couple of hundred thousand dollars. A move to sign Chapman would not occur in a vacuum; it would necessarily impact other player moves this winter.

    8. October 27th, 2009 | 1:50 pm

      Tyler Lyons wants to know about this “Yankees have no budget constraints” thing…if anyone wants to explain it to him…

    9. Raf
      October 28th, 2009 | 1:31 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      YankCrank wrote:
      Honestly, who cares if Cashman breaks the bank on him and he busts?
      Like Kei Igawa? Betcha Cashman would care. How many of those can a GM afford on his resume?

      How many pitchers have failed in MLB? Nothing wrong with doing a little due diligence. Igawa isn’t the first to fail, nor will he be the last.

    10. Raf
      October 28th, 2009 | 1:33 pm

      Scout wrote:

      Take note of the fact that the team passed on a couple of promising pitching prospects it drafted this summer over a difference of a couple of hundred thousand dollars.

      Perhaps in the end the organization decided that they weren’t worth the asking price?

    11. Raf
      October 28th, 2009 | 1:38 pm

      Anyway, from the USS Mariner
      http://ussmariner.com/2009/10/16/about-aroldis-chapman/

      Chapman may get a huge paycheck, but realistically, you’re looking at a guy who isn’t going to be MLB-ready from the get-go. I’d put him as a year or so split between double and triple-A at least, just to get the mechanics in order. After that, you’re still hoping that the breaking pitches manage to develop a little more. They have so far, and are fine for how he uses them, but I wouldn’t call them plus pitches, or signature weapons (that would still be the fastball).

    12. December 4th, 2009 | 11:06 am

      [...] repeat what I said last month, we don’t need another Brackman. [...]

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