• The First Fall Classic: The Red Sox, The Giants And The Cast of Players, Pugs And Politicos Who Re-Invented The World Series In 1912

    Posted by on October 30th, 2009 · Comments (5)

    The First Fall Classic: The Red Sox, the Giants and the Cast of Players, Pugs and Politicos Who Re-Invented the World Series in 1912 A couple of weeks ago, I mentioned that I was reading Mike Vaccaro’s new book: The First Fall Classic: The Red Sox, the Giants and the Cast of Players, Pugs and Politicos Who Re-Invented the World Series in 1912.

    And, I can now share that this one is more than just a book…it’s a time machine.

    Over the years, I’ve read my share of “historical” baseball books. And, many times, these types of works – especially ones that go back 70 to 100 years ago – can come across as dry and a labor to read. But, this is not the case with Vaccaro’s “The First Fall Classic.”

    Reading “The First Fall Classic” is a joyride back to 1912 as it enables you to feel what it was like to be there during that time when this World Series was played. And, what a World Series that one was! (I’m not going to spoil it here by giving you all that went down in the 1912 World Series. Besides, this book does a better job at providing the details than I can do in this space.)

    I highly recommend The First Fall Classic: The Red Sox, the Giants and the Cast of Players, Pugs and Politicos Who Re-Invented the World Series in 1912. And, I cannot think of a better time for you to read it – given that we’re in the middle of a World Series now. It’s very fun to use Vaccaro’s work and compare how much the World Series – and the world! – are different, and yet the same in some ways, today as compared to 1912.

    Really good stuff here in this one from Mike Vaccaro.

    Comments on The First Fall Classic: The Red Sox, The Giants And The Cast of Players, Pugs And Politicos Who Re-Invented The World Series In 1912

    1. October 30th, 2009 | 7:13 pm

      Sounds like a good book. I’m a big baseball history buff so I’m going to have to pick this up.

    2. Tresh Fan
      October 31st, 2009 | 1:22 am

      I consider the 1912 World Series the greatest Series ever played—-and for several reasons. The first of which are the teams. You had the 1912 Giants, one of the greatest of all time. Consider this:

      1912 Giants————————————1975 Reds
      —-.755———————OPS——————–.754—-
      —–823——————–RUNS——————–840—-

      Both teams were lead by their MVP 2Bmen: “Laughing Larry” Doyle (.330-10-90) for the Giants and Joe Morgan (.327-17-94) for the Reds. And both teams featured hard hitting catchers: Chief Myers (147 OPS+) for the Giants and Johnny Bench (140 OPS+) for the Reds. There are also some other similarities, but you get the picture. When you think of the 1912 Giants think of the 1975 Reds…with Christy Mathewson! Yeah, they were that good.

      And do you know what? The team that beat them in the Series, the 1912 Red Sox, may have even been the better team. The Red Sox (.735 OPS, 799 Runs) didn’t have quite the fire power of the Giants, but they were pretty close. Their line-up did feature the AL MVP in Tris Speaker (188 OPS+, 52 SB, and the best defensive CF in the game) and, of course, the player that really set the Red Sox apart from every other team in the Majors: “Smokey Joe” Wood. Wood made 38 starts that year, completing 35 of them, and worked 5 games in relief, finishing all of them, for a record of 34-5 with 1 save on a 1.91 ERA. He also went 36 for 124 (.290) at the plate and was a better than average fielder as a pitcher. And, oh yes, he was just 22 years old (Speaker was all of 24).

      All told the Giants were 103-48 (.682) and finished 10 games up, the Red Sox were 105-47 (.691) and finished 14 games up. Both teams had Run Differentials of over 250 as well. They were at the time the two most dominant teams ever to meet in a World Series. And the 1912 Series is still the only best of seven series to go eight games (one game ended in a tie). Good stuff, and well worth a shelf load of books.

    3. October 31st, 2009 | 11:27 am

      @ Rob Abruzzese: If you love baseball history, you’ll love this book. It takes many of the names that you’ve seen from the past and brings them to live.

    4. October 31st, 2009 | 11:28 am

      @ Tresh Fan:
      You will love this book – and what it tells you about how the Red Sox brass impacted the Series outcome. Truly amazing stuff.

    5. November 1st, 2009 | 6:43 pm

      [...] sold the traditional seats on Duffy’s Cliff held for the Royal Rooters before Game 7 of the 1912 World Series to the general public, the Yankees are stupid to mess with anything that could bring back luck to [...]

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