• Wang’s Wing Worth A Flyer?

    Posted by on November 10th, 2009 · Comments (38)

    Some recent reports on the Former-Worm-Killer Wang. First, via TSN -

    The Boston Globe reports Yankees right-hander Chien-Ming Wang received a very positive report Monday from orthopedic surgeon Dr. James Andrews on his surgically repaired pitching shoulder.

    Wang, 29, underwent arthroscopic surgery in June, ending what had been a miserable season on the mound. He was 1-6 with a 9.64 ERA in 12 games (nine starts). His physical troubles began in 2008 when he injured his foot running the bases in an interleague game at Houston. He was a 19-game winner in 2006 and 2007.

    Next via Ken Davidoff -

    Alan Nero, the agent for the Yankees’ Chien-Ming Wang, stopped by; he works in Chicago. Nero said that Wang saw James Andrews on Monday, and that the right-hander intends to start throwing on Dec. 1 and could be ready for major-league action by April 15. That seems quite optimistic; in any case, the Yankees must decide by Dec. 12 whether to tender Wang a contract, and right now, you’d have to be on “No.”

    If the Yankees give Wang a contract for 2010, we’re talking about something in the range of four to five million bucks (for the season). Unless, as Joel Sherman reports:

    But there is belief in the industry that Wang makes a lot of money back in Taiwan due to his association with the Yankees. Therefore, Wang would probably be more amenable to signing a contract with the Yanks for a low base, say about $1 million, with incentives than any other team.

    Then again, for Chien-Ming to be successful, he’s going to have to be able to consistently throw 94 MPH. Can he do that given what his shoulder has been through this season and in years passed? And, in his big league career, overall, Wang has only been very effective pitching in the “old” Yankee Stadium (which is now gone).

    This one is going to be a tough call for the Yankees. Remember Scott Erickson and Matt Morris? Sometimes these right-handed guys with power sinkers just fall off a cliff when they reach 30-years old (or thereabouts). If New York can work out something for close to a million with incentives, it’s worth rolling the dice. But, if it’s going to cost closer to five million…well…maybe it’s better to take that money and try and get an innings-eater like Jason Marquis (who is also a local guy) or Jon Garland to take a one-year deal to pitch in the back end of a rotation for a team like the Yankees where they can cruise to a 15-win season and maybe a shot at a bigger pay-day in 2011?

    Comments on Wang’s Wing Worth A Flyer?

    1. 77yankees
      November 10th, 2009 | 11:12 pm

      Jason Marquis is a career NL pitcher who has never pitched in th AL, and we all know how well those do changing leagues.

      You’re on the right track. The Yanks are going to need an innings eater to go along with CC & AJ, especially with the possibility of having Pettitte, Joba, Hughes, etc. at the back end who will basically be 6 inning pitchers.

    2. November 11th, 2009 | 12:45 am

      I don’t know, they could probably get Justin Duchscherer and Erik Bedard for somewhere around the same price.

    3. YankCrank
      November 11th, 2009 | 9:07 am

      This is about as simple as Steve put it. If Wang will sign for $2 million or less to pitch about half of a season, do it. If he requires more, let him loose.

      I’ve always liked Wanger, but if he were smart he’d take a low base from the Yanks, hope his arm and foot respond well and if so, take advantage of the strong Yankee offense to rack up the wins and increase his free agent value.

      It’s a total toss up at this point, and when we do any sort of predictions for the 2010 rotation we shouldn’t even include any expected contribution from Wang. If he came back and got one win than we’d be getting more than expected at this point.

    4. MJ
      November 11th, 2009 | 9:11 am

      @Steve Lombardi:
      The Yanks once gave Octavio Dotel $2M to rehab for most of an entire season. I have no issue with the Yanks giving Wang even twice that amount to do the same thing. There is absolutely no downside to keeping a guy that was once an effective pitcher and paying for the privilege to find out if he can be once again.

      As to your idea that the Yanks sign Jason Marquis or Jon Garland…I pray you’re kidding. They both stink on ice. I’ll say it again and will repeat it all winter: Rich Harden is available. You take the upside play every time.

    5. MJ
      November 11th, 2009 | 9:19 am

      @ YankCrank:
      I don’t get why the Yanks would get stingy with Wang? With a $200M payroll, why would 2% of the total sum represent such a quandry? You can never have enough pitching (as we’ve learned many times) and we know that even a team with 6 starters ends up finding out that they need more sometimes.

      Even if it takes $4M to keep Wang, why not do it? It’s not like that expenditure would keep the Yanks from making any number of other moves. Frankly, I think the smart thing to do would be to sign him to a two year deal at $5M. It’s a modest decrease in salary but gives the Yanks the flexibility to build Wang back up to where he can possibly contribute once again.

      I’m all for efficiency but at approximately 2% of the total major league payroll, I don’t understand why people would suddenly get so cost-conscious.

    6. November 11th, 2009 | 10:06 am

      MJ wrote:

      The Yanks once gave Octavio Dotel $2M to rehab for most of an entire season.

      Funny, when the money is thrown away, it’s ‘The Yankees’ that did it and not “Cashman.” ;-)

    7. MJ
      November 11th, 2009 | 10:19 am

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      If it would make you happier, fine, it was that stupid moron Brian Cashman that once spent $2M to have Octavio Dotel rehab from surgery until mid-August of that season.

      Doesn’t change the fact that the Yankees can afford to take these kinds of gambles and doesn’t make the thought process behind it wrong. We don’t yet know what a healthy Wang can do but we do know that a healthy Wang has a place in a major league rotation. For approximately 2% of our annual payroll, I think we’d be foolish not to find out.

      If it doesn’t work out, that stupid moron Brian Cashman ends up having lost very little. And if it does work out, that stupid moron Brian Cashman took a low-risk flyer on one of his own players and got a potentially nice reward.

    8. vivaliyun
      November 11th, 2009 | 10:21 am

      “But there is belief in the industry that Wang makes a lot of money back in Taiwan due to his association with the Yankees”

      i think the person said so don’t know Taiwanese ,we like Wang not because he is a yankee, it’s because of what he is, his personality and the joy he brought us over the past years since he entered the major league….

    9. GDH
      November 11th, 2009 | 10:26 am

      I think the point is that a modest risk with a big upside is appealing in any market, but especially when options are somewhat limited, like they are this year. I like Rich Harden, but would be very interested in what he can do over the course of the season. The guy’s always got loose parts. I’m more interested in where Roy Halladay ends up. For Wang, we should take the flyer. He’s earned it and can help a lot if he comes back a little. A good upside risk.

    10. MJ
      November 11th, 2009 | 10:28 am

      Since there’s no water cooler, I wanted to pull a quote from LoHud which really struck me as interesting. Chad Jennings asked Brian Cashman about the 40-man roster and the Rule 5 draft.

      “Last year I had too many guys to protect and we did that three-for-one for Nick Swisher. We made the right calls. We had decisions to make about who we should protect and who we felt like, alright, we’re not going to protect but we think we’ll get them back.”

      http://yankees.lhblogs.com/2009/11/10/joba-and-phil-starters-that-can-relieve/

      Cashman turned a potentially difficult situation — having too many guys to protect and facing the likelihood of losing those assets for nothing — and turned it into the team’s starting RF, 8-hole hitter and resident jokester. If your #8 hitter puts out a .249/.371/.498 (129 OPS+) season with 35 doubles, 29 HR, 82 RBI and a roughly neutral (-1.7 UZR/150) season in the field, that’s the definition of a very good trade.

    11. MJ
      November 11th, 2009 | 10:30 am

      GDH wrote:

      I think the point is that a modest risk with a big upside is appealing in any market, but especially when options are somewhat limited, like they are this year. I like Rich Harden, but would be very interested in what he can do over the course of the season. The guy’s always got loose parts. I’m more interested in where Roy Halladay ends up. For Wang, we should take the flyer. He’s earned it and can help a lot if he comes back a little. A good upside risk.

      Agree. Harden isn’t the healthiest or most dependable guy on the planet but if we’re talking about the #3 or #4 spot in the rotation, I think he’s a guy you can take a flyer on, as long as you know what you’re getting.

      As for Wang, absolutely. No downside to bringing Wang back.

    12. YankCrank
      November 11th, 2009 | 10:33 am

      @ MJ:
      I see what you’re saying and you make some good points. Let me go a little deeper into my thinking…

      You ask why the Yanks would all of a sudden get stingy with Wang when, throughout his entire Yankee career, the Yankees have been nothing but stingy with Wang because of his injury problems. To this point, he’s missed parts of three seasons (professional and minors) because of shoulder issues and one because of his freak foot injury running the bases. As much as Wang has proven he’s a money pitcher, he’s equally proven that he’s a year-to-year injury risk.

      RAB looked at his situation like this: If we look at Wang’s last productive season, 2007, he finished with 19 wins and was 4.4 WAR. If we assume he can regain his 2007 form, he’ll only pitch half a season in 2009 making him 2.2 WAR…and that’s still assuming he can regain his ace-like stuff. Anything more than a $2 million salary for 2010 would be overpaying for a guy who isn’t guaranteed to pitch effectively, much less stay healthy long enough to pitch. If you simply look at his 2008 and 2009 seasons, how can you bank anything on this guy contributing to the 2010 squad?

      You do bring up a good point though. I believe his arbitration is up after 2011 so why not give him a deal for the next two seasons? Hope to build him up and get lucky. I’m cool with that, but as long as it’s a low base salary.

    13. YankCrank
      November 11th, 2009 | 10:41 am

      MJ wrote:

      Cashman turned a potentially difficult situation — having too many guys to protect and facing the likelihood of losing those assets for nothing — and turned it into the team’s starting RF, 8-hole hitter and resident jokester. If your #8 hitter puts out a .249/.371/.498 (129 OPS+) season with 35 doubles, 29 HR, 82 RBI and a roughly neutral (-1.7 UZR/150) season in the field, that’s the definition of a very good trade.

      I know this isn’t the popular forum to praise Cashman, but this trade was a phenomenal one.

      I also look at one other thing with Swish. In th first half of 2009 his defense and his throwing was just atrocious. He made bonehead plays, poor throws and at times missed easy fly balls. He was Gary Sheffield out there until he was put to work and improved every aspect of his defensive game.

      His UZR improved, he got to a lot more fly balls and his throwing, despite his average arm, has been far improved. I remember him making a couple beautiful throws in the playoffs. Good for Cash for out-dueling Kenny Williams on the trade, good for the Yankees staff on working hard on his defense and good for Swish for being open to improving. For all the reports out of Chicago that he was a whiny a-hole, we saw none of that.

    14. YankCrank
      November 11th, 2009 | 10:49 am

      MJ wrote:

      Since there’s no water cooler,

      To add to that, i’m sure everybody heard of Boras’ intentions to look for a 3-4 year deal for Johnny Damon this offseason. Anybody else feel like we’ve seen the last of Johnny in pinstripes?

      Here’s an idea. If the Yanks don’t want to overpay for Bay/Holliday and don’t like the alternatives, why not offer him arbitration? If he accepts you overpay for one year of Johnny (maybe $15 million, obviously more than what he’s worth), he becomes a free agent next year when there are less impact outfielders on the market and you don’t have to worry about two years of him. If he rejects, we let him go where some idiot like the Giants give him his contract and we get draft picks.

    15. JeremyM
      November 11th, 2009 | 10:55 am

      I don’t see Damon getting 3 to 4 years from anyone right now. I think he’ll get a Bobby Abreu type deal for two years and nothing more.

    16. November 11th, 2009 | 10:56 am

      MJ wrote:

      As to your idea that the Yanks sign Jason Marquis or Jon Garland…I pray you’re kidding. They both stink on ice. .

      Hey, they are NOT Sergio Mitre. Check the stats – use ERA+ or RSAA if you want. Both are always good for 30+ GS and ~200 IP. And, both, on average, or near average pitchers. In fact, in the last 4 years, Marquis’ ERC is lower than his ERA.

      Are they great? No. Are they very good? No. Are they good? Probably not. Do they stink? No way. They’re average.

    17. JeremyM
      November 11th, 2009 | 11:03 am

      I’ve been checking out some (other) Yankee sites, and it seems to me a lot of people are obsessed with the Yankees cutting salary and getting under the luxury tax threshold. One person even advocated getting rid of Pettitte to help the cause. Why does a Yankee fan care about how much money is spent on the team, especially if it’s going to result in the team not doing well? Do some Yankee fans feel guilty after putting up with all of this payroll crap? If there are deals to be made that improve the team at a reasonable cost, make them, total payroll be damned as far as I’m concerned. These are the Yankees.

    18. YankCrank
      November 11th, 2009 | 11:11 am

      JeremyM wrote:

      Why does a Yankee fan care about how much money is spent on the team, especially if it’s going to result in the team not doing well?

      I also never understood this. The Yankees have a an advantage over most teams, and as long as it’s within the rules they should always take advantage of their financial situation. If Yankees fans are ashamed of spending money to where it’s an obsession, than they need to start rooting for another team.

      I don’t care if they spend $200 million, as long as most of it is spent well.

    19. MJ
      November 11th, 2009 | 11:17 am

      @ YankCrank:
      As much as I know this methodology is in vogue, I categorically reject RAB’s (and Fangraphs’s) system of tying performance to contract. Salary is not equal among franchises and there’s no sense trying to normalize what 2.2 WAR means to the Yankees in terms of their budget. It makes for a nice talking point but it’s completely unrealistic to analyze things like this in real life. There is no magic number for what a player is worth and there is no magic number for what performance should amount to in dollars and cents.

      Having said that, even if we suppose that this methodology is absolutely correct, it doesn’t change the fact that even if a penny over $2M for Wang in 2010 is “overpaying”, the Yanks can clearly afford to allocate twice that amount and it would still only represent 2% of their major league budget.

      Wang has been injured for most of the 2008 and 2009 seasons. You can’t realistically bank on him in 2010 since he’d only be coming back from surgery around mid-season. Sign him to a two-year deal, ease him back into the rigors of a baseball season and see what happens. If it doesn’t work out, it hasn’t cost the Yanks much more than a pittance.

    20. MJ
      November 11th, 2009 | 11:21 am

      @ YankCrank:
      Re: Swisher…100% correct. I remember at one point over the summer, the TV guys were talking about how Swisher had started working out with Eiland to improve his throwing. I don’t know if I noticed that Swisher’s throws improved because I heard this tidbit or if the improvement was not just my eyes and ears playing tricks on me but I definitely felt like something changed around that time.

      He made some incredibly good throws in the playoffs, including two great throws in the ALDS and a couple of good ones in the ALCS/WS.

      The Yanks robbed Chicago blind on Swisher. The White Sox bought him high and sold him low and the Yanks plugged in a productive hitter and average fielder with no adverse effect on the Yanks’ 25-man roster.

    21. MJ
      November 11th, 2009 | 11:23 am

      YankCrank wrote:

      Here’s an idea. If the Yanks don’t want to overpay for Bay/Holliday and don’t like the alternatives, why not offer him arbitration? If he accepts you overpay for one year of Johnny (maybe $15 million, obviously more than what he’s worth), he becomes a free agent next year when there are less impact outfielders on the market and you don’t have to worry about two years of him. If he rejects, we let him go where some idiot like the Giants give him his contract and we get draft picks.

      I’d sign up for that in a heartbeat. As it is, I’m prepared to offer Johnny a two year deal at above-market (to placate his desire for a longer-term deal). Offer him arbitration, dangle the chance to earn $15M in 2010 and if he turns it down, the Yanks get two picks out of the deal. If he accepts it, you can walk away from him for the 2011 season.

      JeremyM wrote:

      I don’t see Damon getting 3 to 4 years from anyone right now. I think he’ll get a Bobby Abreu type deal for two years and nothing more.

      Probably true.

    22. November 11th, 2009 | 11:42 am

      The thing with Swisher deal that still bugs me is that so many want to give Cashman a medal for getting Swisher in return for that POS Wilson Betemit. But, few want to recognize that it was Cashman’s work, in the first place, that the POS Betemit was ever on the Yankees roster.

      It’s sort of like praising someone for trading a used Chevy for a lemon of a Ford, and then trading that lemon for a nice Jeep with the provision that they pick up all the remaining payments on the Jeep (left on it’s lease).

      Basically, it’s covering up a bad move (the Chevy for the lemon) by spending money on a car that someone else no longer wanted to make the payments on…

      Gee, spending money to cover a mistake…? That rings a bell.

    23. YankCrank
      November 11th, 2009 | 11:52 am

      @ Steve Lombardi:

      You’re right Steve, only that POS Wilson Betemit was a bench player. The last man on the bench really, and had little to zero impact on how the every-day Yankees performed. Bench players are, in many ways, interchangeable and move around year to year…much like bullpen arms. That’s why Hinske and Hairston will most likely be elsewhere next year, why we see bullpen arms all over the place. They’re not elite talent, and do not earn elite money.

      The Yankees, Brian Cashman and every GM acquire, trade and sign POS bench players every year. However, in this instance, Brian Cashman traded a POS for, what MJ said, was “the team’s starting RF, 8-hole hitter and resident jokester who put out a .249/.371/.498 (129 OPS+) season with 35 doubles, 29 HR, 82 RBI.”

      Interchangeable POS for Swisher? I’ll take it, and judging by how our season finished up, 29 other GMs would have taken it too. But they didn’t. Anybody could have had Swisher, Chicago basically gave him away for nothing, but Cash got him.

    24. YankCrank
      November 11th, 2009 | 11:58 am

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      The basic point of what I said was, of course Betemit was and is a POS. Most bench players are, that’s why they’re on the bench.

      Slamming Cashman for acquiring a POS player to fill a position mostly held by POS players is ridiculous.

      However, trading a POS for someone with a 129 OPS+ is worth a medal.

    25. MJ
      November 11th, 2009 | 12:05 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      The thing with Swisher deal that still bugs me is that so many want to give Cashman a medal for getting Swisher in return for that POS Wilson Betemit. But, few want to recognize that it was Cashman’s work, in the first place, that the POS Betemit was ever on the Yankees roster.
      It’s sort of like praising someone for trading a used Chevy for a lemon of a Ford, and then trading that lemon for a nice Jeep with the provision that they pick up all the remaining payments on the Jeep (left on it’s lease).
      Basically, it’s covering up a bad move (the Chevy for the lemon) by spending money on a car that someone else no longer wanted to make the payments on…
      Gee, spending money to cover a mistake…? That rings a bell.

      I’m not sure I get what you’re complaining about? The Yanks traded a fungible middle reliever (Scott Proctor) at approximately the peak of his value for a player they needed more, at the time, in Wilson Betemit. Betemit effectively replaced Andy Phillips/Miguel Cairo’s role as a utility infielder and gave the Yankees a bit of lefty power off the bench. Betemit, clearly, wasn’t brought to be a starting player or a mainstay in the everyday lineup. He was one reserve player traded for another.

      That the Yanks turned the “POS Betemit” into Swisher is the main point. But if you want to portray this as a salary dump and try to spin this into another example of how Cashman is a terrible GM that merely survives because other teams unload bad contracts onto his cluelessly generous roster then you’ll also have to account for the fact that the White Sox were perfectly willing to pay for Swisher (in both dollars remaining on his contract AND prospects). Simply looking at the incongruous results of the two trades involving Swisher should tell you that this was a good trade for the Yankees, and not some lucky move. Almost everyone accurately predicted that Swisher would rebound from an extremely unlucky 2008 season and, sure enough, that prediction came true to the Yankees’ great benefit.

      Once again, Steve, you’re letting your incredible bias regarding Cashman color your analysis.

    26. YankCrank
      November 11th, 2009 | 12:14 pm

      @ MJ:
      I wish we had made a bet before the season with Steve and butchie about Swish. I wouldn’t mind seeing a pic of them sporting the Swish-hawk as part of betting Swish was a 4th outfielder and Nady would be more productive :)

    27. MJ
      November 11th, 2009 | 12:32 pm

      @ YankCrank:
      LOL, seriously!! Missed opportunity!

    28. MJ
      November 11th, 2009 | 1:10 pm

      Continuing from a previous thread regarding some commenters’ desire to sign John Lackey:

      http://riveraveblues.com/2009/11/the-case-against-lackey-came-two-years-ago-19828/

      I couldn’t agree more with RAB’s point on this one. Lackey is fine but has enough warts to warrant the Yanks thinking longer-term here.

    29. YankCrank
      November 11th, 2009 | 1:26 pm

      MJ wrote:

      Continuing from a previous thread regarding some commenters’ desire to sign John Lackey:

      http://riveraveblues.com/2009/11/the-case-against-lackey-came-two-years-ago-19828/

      I couldn’t agree more with RAB’s point on this one. Lackey is fine but has enough warts to warrant the Yanks thinking longer-term here.

      I agree 100% with that Lackey post, and it even further proves why we shouldn’t throw money at Bay or Holliday. Nice players, but they don’t fall within our long-term plan.

    30. YankCrank
      November 11th, 2009 | 1:31 pm

      Also, in a previous thread I said it wouldn’t be a bad idea for the Yanks to consider a one year, maybe $10 million deal for Mike Cameron.

      Fangraphs did a nice little write-up on how, with what Cameron still offers and what he costs, he would be a better bargain than Jason Bay and still be more productive overall. Check it out:

      http://www.fangraphs.com/blogs/index.php/bay-vs-cameron/

      I know he’ll be 37, and he’s not my top choice for Yankee outfielders, but if Damon bolts or is too expensive, i’d rather see a Cameron for one year than a huge deal for Bay or Holliday.

    31. MJ
      November 11th, 2009 | 1:43 pm

      @ YankCrank:
      Given binary choices — Cameron for 1Y/$10M or Bay/Holliday for multipe years and lots of money — I’d definitely take the Cameron option also.

      I wish the Yanks had signed him instead of stupid Kenny Lofton back in 2004 (in fact the Mets and Yanks both blew it that winter…the Mets should’ve signed Lofton as a one year bridge to Beltran and the Yanks should’ve given Cameron the three-year deal he got from the Mets to immediately put Bernie on ice).

      Having said that, I’m not a huge fan of Cameron’s and never have been. Dunno why, he just has always annoyed me.

    32. GDH
      November 11th, 2009 | 2:53 pm

      YankCrank wrote:

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      Brian Cashman traded a POS for, what MJ said, was “the team’s starting RF, 8-hole hitter and resident jokester who put out a .249/.371/.498 (129 OPS+) season with 35 doubles, 29 HR, 82 RBI.”

      Interchangeable POS for Swisher? I’ll take it, and judging by how our season finished up, 29 other GMs would have taken it too. But they didn’t. Anybody could have had Swisher, Chicago basically gave him away for nothing, but Cash got him.

      Absolutely. And let’s not forget that at the time Swish was signed, there was no Tex – and no one really expected the Yanks to land him. At that time he was our starting 1B, and a backup RF. That gave the Yankees at least some leverage in being able to sit in the wings as the Tex sweepstakes took place. Whether Cashman was willing to start the season with Swish at 1B we’ll never know, but this trade panned out almost perfectly for the Yankees.

    33. YankCrank
      November 11th, 2009 | 3:05 pm

      GDH wrote:

      Absolutely. And let’s not forget that at the time Swish was signed, there was no Tex – and no one really expected the Yanks to land him. At that time he was our starting 1B, and a backup RF. That gave the Yankees at least some leverage in being able to sit in the wings as the Tex sweepstakes took place. Whether Cashman was willing to start the season with Swish at 1B we’ll never know, but this trade panned out almost perfectly for the Yankees.

      Never thought about that, very good point.

    34. GDH
      November 11th, 2009 | 3:23 pm

      Re: Swisher – I live in the SF Bay Area and usually only see the Yanks in Oakland – I always liked Swisher even then, and was pleased the Yanks signed him, and very pleased at the way it worked out. That said, there was at least one stretch where if he struck out looking one more time I was ready to throw a beer through the TV.

    35. MJ
      November 11th, 2009 | 3:59 pm

      GDH wrote:

      Re: Swisher – I live in the SF Bay Area and usually only see the Yanks in Oakland – I always liked Swisher even then, and was pleased the Yanks signed him, and very pleased at the way it worked out. That said, there was at least one stretch where if he struck out looking one more time I was ready to throw a beer through the TV.

      Absolutely. Between his bad May, bad July (or was it August) and generally horrible post-season at the plate, Swisher is far from the perfect player.

      But as I wrote, and YankCrank and you said, Swisher doesn’t need to be perfect. He produced plenty for the team and the Yanks got him for guys that had no place on the Yanks 40-man roster going forward. Sure, the Yanks had the cash to pick up the tab on him but so did a host of other teams that needed OF help. The Mets and Cubs come to mind. Cashman got Swisher and the Mets/Cubs didn’t. Their loss (and Kenny WIlliams’ bizarre impatience) was our gain.

    36. redbug
      November 11th, 2009 | 5:54 pm

      Mj wrote:

      The Yanks once gave Octavio Dotel $2M to rehab for most of an entire season. I have no issue with the Yanks giving Wang even twice that amount to do the same thing. There is absolutely no downside to keeping a guy that was once an effective pitcher and paying for the privilege to find out if he can be once again.
      ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

      Absolutely agree. Injury free, Wang won 19 games for 2 yr’s and was on his way to another great yr in ’08. Give the man a chance. Buy low.

    37. dpy2101
      November 17th, 2009 | 1:36 am

      Some people have written that perhaps Wang makes money in Taiwan because he’s a Yankee…

      Have we considered the possibility that the YANKEES make money in Taiwan because Wang is a Yankee? In terms of broadcasting, advertising, apparel sales… Wang could be making his own salary. It doesn’t seem very outlandish if you consider how many people are Yankees/Red Sox/Mariners fans in Japan or Phillies fans in Korea. These are HUGE media markets with very little connection to most teams aside from the ones that have their homegrown players.

    38. December 8th, 2009 | 12:40 pm

      [...] Marquis to a short-term deal would make more sense than relying on a comeback or hoping to find a genie in a [...]

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