• Wild Thought: Jeter’s Final Days As A Ray?

    Posted by on February 25th, 2010 · Comments (15)

    Joe Henderson offered this from the Jeter presser yesterday -

    So [Derek Jeter] talked, patiently fielding questions as if they were batting practice ground balls. Only one subject was off limits.

    A NewsChannel 8 reporter barely got a question out about the 30,875-square foot palace Jeter is building on Davis Islands, only to be sternly rebuked.

    “I’m not going to talk about that,” Jeter said.

    In case we didn’t get the message, a Yankees public relations official chimed in, “No more questions about the fence around his house, either.”

    Actually, Jeter has lived among us since 1994 when he was working through the Yankees’ minor-league system. The house would seem to indicate he plans to stay a while longer, which is a good thing.

    “I moved down here permanently to work out because it got a little cold in Michigan when I was in the minor leagues and I’ve been here ever since. This is where I call home. I enjoy Tampa, I enjoy my time here.”

    O.K., so, Derek hearts Tampa. Warm weather, better taxes, etc. That’s not hard to understand. But, if Jeter really calls Tampa “home,” would he ever consider playing for “the home team”?

    If the Rays ever get their new ballpark, and the team continues to be an factor in the A.L. East, and if Jeter wants to keep playing and the Yankees don’t want him around, is it such a wild thought to think that Derek Jeter – perhaps like Wade Boggs – might close out his career as a member of the Tampa Bay Rays?

    Hey, the last stat line in Yogi Berra’s playing career says “Mets.” Hank Aaron closed out as a Brewer. Anything is possible, no?

    Comments on Wild Thought: Jeter’s Final Days As A Ray?

    1. clintfsu813
      February 25th, 2010 | 11:22 am

      If he did go over there and get hit #3000, that joke of a franchise would probably retire his number just like they did Boggs.

    2. jay
      February 25th, 2010 | 11:36 am

      There’s definitely tax advantages to playing in Florida.

    3. clintfsu813
      February 25th, 2010 | 11:55 am

      @ jay:
      Don’t I know it!

    4. MJ Recanati
      February 25th, 2010 | 12:15 pm

      @ clintfsu813:
      LOL, TBR retiring Boggs’s uniform was just so sad. I don’t think the current ownership/management team would stoop to something that ridiculous, however.

      @ jay:
      MLB players pay taxes in all states they appear in for a given year. For the Yanks, that means NY, MA, MD, FL, OH, MI, IL, KS, MN, CA, WA, TX plus any visits they make to interleague cities not mentioned herein. I’m not sure about tax withholding for Canada (ON) but I’m sure the Canadians have their hand out too.

      Jeter’s tax advantage for living in Florida probably won’t kick in until he fully retires. Also, didn’t he get into some minor tax trouble over the past two years about which state was listed as his primary residence?

    5. MJ Recanati
      February 25th, 2010 | 12:17 pm

      As to the question of Jeter spending his final days as a member of the Rays, that’d be just fine with me.

      However, given how Tampa is no longer run by that idiot Vince Naimoli, I can’t envision the current management team in Tampa spending the money to bring in an old fart like Jeter.

    6. jrk
      February 25th, 2010 | 12:35 pm

      Sorry, but the fact that taxes are even brought up in this discussion is fairly ridiculous. No player of Jeter’s wealth would EVER let that even come close to being a serious factor in deciding where to play.

    7. MJ Recanati
      February 25th, 2010 | 12:38 pm

      @ jrk:
      Why not? Isn’t it human nature to want to protect what you’ve worked very hard to earn? Isn’t that why private CPA’s have jobs around this time of year?

      It may not be the ONLY factor or the biggest one but I’m sure wealth preservation is part of any financial decision for Jeter, just as it is with high net worth individuals in banking or medicine or engineering. Why would athletes be exempt from human nature?

    8. jrk
      February 25th, 2010 | 12:41 pm

      let me rephrase – no player of his wealth and situation. I do recognize that when you make that much money, slight differences in tax rates could amount to a large sum of money. But not enough to influence the decision of someone plenty wealthy and someone with a lasting legacy in NY. My point is that even if Jeter were to end up with greater net money after taxes in Tampa, the contract itself would be the main reason he went to Tampa, NOT tax differences (even though they play into the total equation).

    9. jrk
      February 25th, 2010 | 12:44 pm

      And protecting what you earn, and preserving your wealth is more about intelligent investing, and tax differences, although a small factor, will not even come close to measuring up with his desire to be in a certain city. wherever he is, he will adequately protect his wealth.

    10. MJ Recanati
      February 25th, 2010 | 12:53 pm

      @ jrk:
      You put too much faith in Derek Jeter. Cities are all the same. He’s got a private jet, he can fly to NY and party here if he wants to.

      I’m not saying he wants to leave but don’t let the idea that this city is too special to leave is as big a factor to him as it would be to the rest of us.

    11. jrk
      February 25th, 2010 | 1:10 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:
      I didn’t mean that he won’t want to leave NY cause the city is so special. I very well could see him being happy in Tampa. My point was that WHICHEVER city he chose, it would be because of his decision to to be in that city, play for that team, and money (of which taxes will play a very minor role). But I see your point.

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Cities are all the same.

      This line irks me. I’m a biased New Yorker dying to finish school in Boston so that I can return home. Boston sucks, for many reasons other than the Sox, but that’s a whole different discussion. I know you meant it in the sense that he can travel wherever he wants, but we all know no where beats NY ;)

    12. MJ Recanati
      February 25th, 2010 | 1:14 pm

      @ jrk:
      I’m 34.7 years old I was born in NYC. Apart from 8/1993-11/1999, I’ve spent the rest of my time on earth living in NYC. I know this is the best city in the world and I don’t foresee a time when I would ever contemplate leaving it. I didn’t mean to irk you and I definitely feel sorry for anyone that has to spend any time living (or even visiting) Boston. It’s a dump, and not just because of the Red Sox.

    13. jrk
      February 25th, 2010 | 1:35 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:
      haha now we’re talking.
      but 34.7? isn’t the rule we stop using fractions of ages once we reach double digits? ;)

    14. MJ Recanati
      February 25th, 2010 | 1:38 pm

      @ jrk:
      LOL, it was just to indicate how much I love NYC that I count every day I get to spend here as a blessing.

    15. jay
      February 25th, 2010 | 2:39 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      @ jay:
      MLB players pay taxes in all states they appear in for a given year. For the Yanks, that means NY, MA, MD, FL, OH, MI, IL, KS, MN, CA, WA, TX plus any visits they make to interleague cities not mentioned herein. I’m not sure about tax withholding for Canada (ON) but I’m sure the Canadians have their hand out too.
      Jeter’s tax advantage for living in Florida probably won’t kick in until he fully retires. Also, didn’t he get into some minor tax trouble over the past two years about which state was listed as his primary residence?

      I think you’re like me .. you argue for the sake of arguing.

      So, you go to great lengths to list all the places he would have to pay taxes. But then you remind me that he tried to skate from some NYC taxes by claiming he lived in Florida.

      If he played in Florida (which I guess was confusing.. I meant ‘if he played for the Rays), he could have Florida as his primary residence without trouble, and avoid that NYC tax burden.

      As a side note, I’m surprised the different tax rates aren’t brought up when it comes to payroll. Those tax bills aren’t chump change when signing players, and the Yankees I’m sure compensate for that when extending offers. Someone should write an article… maybe put contracts and payrolls into a tax neutral environment and compare them.

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.