• The Risk Of A-Rod’s Day In Buffalo

    Posted by on March 26th, 2010 · Comments (15)

    A great summary on where A-Rod is at, right now, with this Galea mess, via Dan Herbeck

    The New York Yankees’ power-hitting third baseman, known as A-Rod, is scheduled to be interviewed by federal prosecutors and agents about his dealings with a Toronto physician who is the subject of a grand jury investigation here into performance-enhancing drugs.

    Five sources close to the case said Rodriguez is considered a witness — not a target — of the investigation. They told The Buffalo News that Rodriguez is one of about 10 professional athletes the feds plan to question about treatment they received from Dr. Anthony Galea.

    But the investigation still has the potential of causing problems for the athletes, including Rodriguez, who admitted publicly last year that he used performance-enhancing drugs from 2001 to 2003.

    “Investigations like this put professional athletes between a rock and a hard place,” said Paul Finkelman, a professor at Albany Law School who is an expert on legal issues involving sports and drugs.

    “If players lie, they could be criminally prosecuted for it. But if they tell the truth, and if they admit doing anything that is improper under the rules of baseball, they potentially could get into trouble with Major League Baseball.”

    The law professor was quick to point out that he has no way of knowing whether Rodriguez or any other player ever got substances from Galea that are banned by Major League Baseball.

    Tight secrecy surrounds Rodriguez’s planned visit. The U.S. attorney’s office and federal agents all declined to discuss it Thursday.

    “No comment on an ongoing investigation,” said James H. Robertson, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Buffalo office.

    Two of Rodriguez’s attorneys did not return calls seeking comment.

    A third attorney for Rodriguez, Patrick J. Brown of Buffalo, said he had no comment.

    So far, federal agents and prosecutors have made no allegation that A-Rod or any other athlete received performance-enhancing drugs from Galea.

    One person who was willing to comment on Galea’s dealings with A-Rod was Mark J. Mahoney, Galea’s Buffalo attorney.

    “I can tell you that [Galea] never gave performance-enhancing drugs to A-Rod or any other athlete. And the government knows it,” Mahoney said. “I think the government is trying to scare these athletes into saying what they want to hear.”

    Will federal agents share any of the information they obtain in the Galea case with Major League Baseball officials?

    Earl P. Gould, an FBI spokesman in Buffalo, said he could not comment.

    “We have no comment,” on that question or any aspect of the Galea investigation, Major League Baseball spokesman Pat Courtney said.

    Rodriguez is expected to talk with federal agents and prosecutors, not the grand jury, and if that’s the case, some observers think that it is a mistake.

    “If I represented A-Rod, I would tell him to insist on going right into the grand jury, rather than being interviewed by federal agents,” Finkelman said. “I would tell him to confine his statements to the grand jury room, because it is illegal to leak information that comes out in the grand jury.”

    To me, the biggest two points here are:

    …If players lie, they could be criminally prosecuted for it. But if they tell the truth, and if they admit doing anything that is improper under the rules of baseball, they potentially could get into trouble with Major League Baseball…

    …If I represented A-Rod, I would tell him to insist on going right into the grand jury, rather than being interviewed by federal agents. I would tell him to confine his statements to the grand jury room, because it is illegal to leak information that comes out in the grand jury…

    So, there you have it. If A-Rod lies, and is caught, he’s in trouble. And, if he tells the truth, there’s a great chance that it can be leaked without it being illegal. So, to me, at this point, I’m starting to think that Alex is in some hot water here. And, anyone who thinks this matter is going to be a non-issue for A-Rod and the Yankees is just hanging on to wishful thinking at this junction.

    Comments on The Risk Of A-Rod’s Day In Buffalo

    1. throwstrikes
      March 26th, 2010 | 1:37 pm

      You taking a negative approach on something A-Rod related? SHOCKING!

    2. March 26th, 2010 | 1:58 pm

      throwstrikes wrote:

      You taking a negative approach on something A-Rod related? SHOCKING!

      Oh, that’s right. Let’s see, the news item here is: A-Rod had to leave the team to appear before federal investigators to answer questions about his dealings with a doctor, that were not cleared by the team, because the doctor is the subject of a grand jury investigation into performance-enhancing drugs.

      What exactly is my reaction to this supposed to be? Are you suggesting that it would be more “Yankees fan” of me to have a comment like: Yea! A-Rod! He rules! I wish I had a vajayjay so that I could have his baby because he’s sooooo awesome!

    3. throwstrikes
      March 26th, 2010 | 2:24 pm

      No, but the possibility exists that he could go to Buffalo, answer a few questions and the matter would be closed too.

      The Yankees can huff and puff all they want but they authorized him to work with a therapist that had known BALCO ties and was partners with Galea so due diligence over the company they authorized A-Rod to keep after the fact falls into the hindsight is 20/20 category.

      Instead of following a straight line to get from Point A to B, you choose to take the most complicated route to get there.

      Granted neither Beltran nor Reyes has a steroid admission in their past (neither did A-Rod 14 months ago) but both have taken the same path this spring that A-Rod has but you’ve only driven a car off the road with one of those guys in it.

      Constructing doomsday scenarios is premature.

    4. BellaSakura
      March 26th, 2010 | 2:29 pm

      Appearing before a grand jury does not ensure that his testimony will remain confidential. Remember the law professor is speaking without knowledge of the specifics of the case. And he’s a naive one if he thinks Alex’s testimony won’t have a good chance of being leaked if he admits to wrongdoing.

    5. March 26th, 2010 | 2:37 pm

      throwstrikes wrote:

      Constructing doomsday scenarios is premature.

      And, ignoring the possibility of them, given all the facts to date, is being foolishly and/or blindly optimistic.

    6. BellaSakura
      March 26th, 2010 | 2:46 pm

      Okay something bad could happen, and then there is the possibility nothing could happen. I think most people understand it could go either way.

      So what are the facts as we know them today? Being mindful that allegations are not necessarily facts.

    7. throwstrikes
      March 26th, 2010 | 2:54 pm

      BellaSakura wrote:

      Appearing before a grand jury does not ensure that his testimony will remain confidential. Remember the law professor is speaking without knowledge of the specifics of the case. And he’s a naive one if he thinks Alex’s testimony won’t have a good chance of being leaked if he admits to wrongdoing.

      Appearing before a grand jury does assure that leaks will be prosecuted- whether it is the journalist who reports it and refuses to give up the source or the source if it can be discovered who it is.

    8. throwstrikes
      March 26th, 2010 | 2:59 pm

      Steve

      Trust me, I’m no Pollyanna and things may be as you say but I’ll wait for facts and not suppositions to get me there.

    9. BellaSakura
      March 26th, 2010 | 3:01 pm

      Yeah I’m aware of that throwstrikes but the damage is already done once there is a leak.

    10. March 26th, 2010 | 3:19 pm

      I’m not sure what any of this adds. If he got HGH, then it will be trouble. If he didnt, then he will be fine and it will be a non-issue. Being that we have absolutely no information (just his rep) at this point that would make us doubt A-Rod’s explanation, it is a non-story right now, until any info about HGH comes out.

    11. OldYanksFan
      March 26th, 2010 | 4:35 pm

      My question is WHY did ARod see that Doc? Weren’t there other/better Docs to see if he had an issue?

    12. March 26th, 2010 | 4:50 pm

      OldYanksFan wrote:

      My question is WHY did ARod see that Doc? Weren’t there other/better Docs to see if he had an issue?

      He was referred to him by Mark Lindsay, who is Galea’s partner and was in charge of Alex’s rehab. Galea is apparently well known for this blood spinning technique, which is legal, although medical experts diverge on its effectiveness.

    13. redbug
      March 26th, 2010 | 5:04 pm

      Accoding to Lohud there was no meeting today. Incredibly, Arod said he hadn’t read reports that there would be a meeting. Give me a break.

      “Alex Rodriguez said he was not in Buffalo today. He stayed in Tampa last night and he’s here now.

      “There was no meeting,” Rodriguez said. “No meeting today.”

      Joe Girardi had previously indicated that he didn’t expect Rodriguez to be available for tonight’s game, and earlier this week — when reports of a Friday meeting broke — Rodriguez committed only to playing Thursday, not Friday. Rodriguez said he never read reports of a Friday meeting, so he couldn’t comment on whether they were false.”

    14. March 27th, 2010 | 8:53 am

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      “What exactly is my reaction to this supposed to be? Are you suggesting that it would be more “Yankees fan” of me to have a comment like: Yea! A-Rod! He rules! I wish I had a vajayjay so that I could have his baby because he’s sooooo awesome!”

      Huh? Where does this come from? Is your assumption that anybody who doesn’t despise A-Rod the way you do must have some ulterior motives for that?

    15. March 27th, 2010 | 9:12 am

      @ lisaswan:

      Nope. I’m just saying that asking someone to have a “positive” approach to this news around A-Rod is sort of unrealistic.

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