• Mr. October, Scouts, On Cano

    Posted by on April 27th, 2010 · Comments (9)

    Via George King

    Reggie Jackson’s belief that Robinson Cano has passed Dustin Pedroia as the premier second baseman in the American League isn’t simply Mr. October’s bias because he works for the Yankees.

    “After this season he will be the best second baseman in the American League and then chase Chase [Utley],” Jackson told The Post. “He is a better player than Pedroia and I think Pedroia is a great player, an MVP.”

    Jackson has company from the fraternity that scouts everything from tools to makeup.

    The Post contacted six scouts and asked them who was better. Three clearly favored the sizzling Cano, another said it was close but went with Cano and while the fourth picked Pedroia, he admitted Cano was the better hitter. The sixth said Cano had better skills but Pedroia’s all-out effort every game made it a push.

    “I’ll go with Cano over Pedroia. Cano is a left-handed hitter and can hit for more power,” said a scout who watched Cano go 6-for-11 (.545) and drive in three runs in a three-game series against the Angels this past weekend. “With Pedroia [Fenway Park] is made for his swing. Pedroia can do some things but Cano has better range, better arm strength and turns the double play better. However, neither one is ever going to be Chase Utley.”

    “Cano has passed Pedroia,” said another scout who watched Cano at Angel Stadium. “He is more athletic and as far as baseball skills he has gone by him. He has a shorter swing than Pedroia and Cano will use the whole field. He has quicker hands and his athleticism is better. Getting it all out of him is the only question I have, but he is by Pedroia.”

    I like Robby Cano. And, it’s pretty amazing to see him reach the level he has in the eyes of so many…since he was not considered to be…again, by many…to be a blue-chip prospect when he was in the minor leagues. Then again…part of me wonders…how many were saying the same type of wonderful things…in 2002…about Jose Vidro…as they are saying now about Cano? A lot can happen, sometimes, with young players who look like can’t-miss stars and future Hall-of-Famers…

    Comments on Mr. October, Scouts, On Cano

    1. MJ Recanati
      April 27th, 2010 | 10:21 am

      A lot can happen, sometimes, with young players who look like can’t-miss stars and future Hall-of-Famers…
      ———
      Agreed. But yesterday you classified Tyler Clippard as a “shut down” reliever. Why is Cano — a player with a full five year track record of success to evaluate — someone to hedge on but Tyler Clippard inspires confidence in you?

      Not trying to be argumentative here, just trying to figure out why you feel one way about a player but another way about another.

    2. April 27th, 2010 | 10:43 am

      Second basemen in particular seem to have a nasty habit of cratering after early periods of sustained excellence.

      Think Carlos Baerga, or closer to home, Chuck Knoblauch.

    3. MJ Recanati
      April 27th, 2010 | 10:46 am

      @ Sean McNally:
      Fair enough, but that wouldn’t change the tenor of my question in general.

    4. April 27th, 2010 | 11:09 am

      Sean McNally wrote:

      Second basemen in particular seem to have a nasty habit of cratering after early periods of sustained excellence.
      Think Carlos Baerga, or closer to home, Chuck Knoblauch.

      Amen.

    5. April 27th, 2010 | 11:13 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      But yesterday you classified Tyler Clippard as a “shut down” reliever. Why is Cano — a player with a full five year track record of success to evaluate — someone to hedge on but Tyler Clippard inspires confidence in you?

      Clippard is a potential shut-down RP, right now. As such, I would rather have him, right now, than the player the Yankees traded him for (Jonathan Albaladejo) or someone like Sergio Mitre.

      Same applies to Cano. Right now, I can’t think of many that I would rather have…but, that said, I’m just saying that things that look great now sometimes don’t stay great.

      Sure, same applies to Clippard. But, Albaladejo sucks now, and, always will. That’s why I would rather have Clippard – now.

    6. MJ Recanati
      April 27th, 2010 | 1:03 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      But, Albaladejo sucks now, and, always will. That’s why I would rather have Clippard – now.

      But if the Yanks had Clippard, you’d be screaming at the Yanks if he ever got a few starts in place of an injured member of the rotation and didn’t perform up to snuff. After all, his MiLB record indicates competence but not dominance. Hell, the Yanks have one of the most dominant MiLB pitchers in recent memory and you’ve spent the last few years trying to denigrate him and trade him at every opportunity.

      I’m sorry, this isn’t meant as an insult but you can’t be taken seriously when you pine for young arms that were traded away based upon how you react when they’re still in-house.

    7. Raf
      April 27th, 2010 | 3:20 pm

      Sean McNally wrote:

      Second basemen in particular seem to have a nasty habit of cratering after early periods of sustained excellence.
      Think Carlos Baerga, or closer to home, Chuck Knoblauch.

      Part and parcel the nature of the position. Offensively elite 2b are rare. I do like the Baerga comp to Cano, both seem to rely heavy on BA.

      Looking @ “similar batters” on Cano’s b-r page doesn’t necessarily inspire confidence.

    8. April 27th, 2010 | 3:39 pm

      FWIW, Knobby is a bit of a rare case. His issues were in his head.

    9. May 2nd, 2010 | 10:04 pm

      [...] reading Rob Neyer and Steve Lombardi address George King’s article where six surveyed scouts determined Robinson Cano has [...]

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