• Dallas Braden Not Done Talking About A-Rod

    Posted by on May 5th, 2010 · Comments (29)

    Did he really say: “[A-Rod] plays for the name on the back [of his uniform]“?

    Yes, he did….

    Comments on Dallas Braden Not Done Talking About A-Rod

    1. May 5th, 2010 | 11:38 pm

      Only one word to describe Braden: Tool.

    2. jrk
      May 6th, 2010 | 8:46 am

      I was gunna go with UGLY

    3. MJ Recanati
      May 6th, 2010 | 8:53 am

      This pretty much sums up why all the “unwritten rules” controversy was bogus. No one’s talking about this anymore except for Braden. It was always a bigger deal in his own mind than in anyone else’s.

      If the A’s had a shred of intellect, they’d tell him to STFU and worry about himself. He’s doing the team no favors by making it all about A-Rod nearly three weeks after the fact.

    4. May 6th, 2010 | 9:15 am

      I refer us all back to my last batch of scribblings around here: http://waswatching.com/2010/04/29/joe-p-kills-it/ – if the “offender” in question were anyone but A-Rod, then this would have died a while ago.

      As it is, it should have died a while ago anyway.

    5. May 6th, 2010 | 9:43 am

      He’s also been pitching terribly since it happened – two losses in a row, and his ERA has jumped from 2.77 to 4.14.

    6. MJ Recanati
      May 6th, 2010 | 9:46 am

      @ lisaswan:
      Serves the little pissant right. I guess A-Rod’s dismissive tone was warranted…he’s a nobody.

    7. Evan3457
      May 6th, 2010 | 11:05 am

      Scientists have not yet invented an electron microscope powerful enough to view and measure my interest in this non-troversy.

      In a nutshell: those who make bashing A-Rod a hobby can pick this stick up and add it to the bushel they carry around to pull out at any moment when the topic of A-Rod comes up. To normal people: who cares?

    8. May 6th, 2010 | 12:44 pm

      [...] Dallas Braden Not Done Talking About A-RodBraden, the Oakland pitcher who challenged Alex Rodriguez when he ran across the pitcher’s mound, is still yapping at the Yankee star. You know, Braden’s comments didn’t annoy me. He wants to compete, and he can say what he wants. The interviewer in this clip ticked me off. Hey, pal, Interviewing 101. Ask questions, don’t make speeches. We hear more of you than we do of Braden here. [...]

    9. RobertGKramer@AOL.Com
      May 6th, 2010 | 12:57 pm

      Braden earns the nick name “Brainless” with his comment. Someone tell him there are no names on the backs of Yankee’s uniforms!

    10. The_203
      May 6th, 2010 | 1:29 pm

      Does Oakland not offer a dental plan to its employees?

    11. MJ Recanati
      May 6th, 2010 | 1:32 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      In a nutshell: those who make bashing A-Rod a hobby can pick this stick up and add it to the bushel they carry around to pull out at any moment when the topic of A-Rod comes up. To normal people: who cares?

      Brilliantly put.

    12. G.I. Joey
      May 6th, 2010 | 2:00 pm

      I’m not sure really who came off as more smug in that interview, Dallas or the d-bag asking the questions. Keep on drinking the Haterade Dallas. It’s doing wonders for your ERA.

    13. May 6th, 2010 | 2:04 pm

      FWIW, ‘tho, I’ve been watching baseball closely for a long time – esp. Yankees baseball. And, this is not the first time that I’ve heard A-Rod referred to as being a selfish “me” type player – as Braden labels him. And, I’ve never heard or read comments from anyone in the game saying that about Sabathia, Jeter, Teixiera, Rivera, Pettitte, Tino Martinez, etc.

      Sure, it’s been said about other players in the past – ranging from the greatest of Reggie to more current players like Nick Swisher. So, A-Rod is not the only player to ever get this label.

      But, it’s just interesting that you never hear about players like Tony Gwynn, Albert Pujlos, George Brett, Ryan Howard, Robin Yount and Ryan Zimmerman as being called “me” players or those who only care about themselves whereas certain other players – like Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, and A-Rod – you hear it all the time.

      If perception is reality, then you have to consider that what’s being said about these guys, A-Rod included, is true.

    14. MJ Recanati
      May 6th, 2010 | 2:26 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      If perception is reality, then you have to consider that what’s being said about these guys, A-Rod included, is true.

      It’s true to you since that’s how you perceive A-Rod. It’s not true to me since that’s not how I perceive him.

      There are plenty of players that have played with Clemens, Bonds and A-Rod that think the world of them which leads me to believe that “conventional wisdom” or “group-think” isn’t necessarily always reality, it’s equally possible that it’s just laziness.

    15. May 6th, 2010 | 3:01 pm

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      Please. You’re taking the side of an unhinged person who thinks that challenging A-Rod to a fistfight is an appropriate response to somebody walking on a pile of dirt? C’mon now.

    16. May 6th, 2010 | 3:04 pm

      And by the way, since A-Rod despisers love to ignore this, I must remind them for the umpteenth time that Rodriguez SWITCHED POSITIONS to be a Yankee, even though he took a back seat to the inferior shortstop. Tell me anybody else of his caliber in his generation who would be willing to do such a thing. Yeah, but he’s really, really selfish. After all, Dallas Braden said so!

    17. May 6th, 2010 | 3:27 pm

      lisaswan wrote:

      And by the way, since A-Rod despisers love to ignore this, I must remind them for the umpteenth time that Rodriguez SWITCHED POSITIONS to be a Yankee, even though he took a back seat to the inferior shortstop. Tell me anybody else of his caliber in his generation who would be willing to do such a thing. Yeah, but he’s really, really selfish.

      Please allow me to offer another view of the ‘noble move’ that A-Rod made – switching positions.

      First, he agreed to switch positions in order to leave a team that was a terrible losing franchise at the time to join a team that had just played in six of the last eight World Series.

      Second, he agreed to switch positions in order to leave a market that offered very little national exposure to play in the biggest media market in the country – thus increasing his chances for advertising perks by many. (Remember that national Pepsi spot that A-Rod got, driving the truck to catch balls, soon after joining NY?)

      Third, he agreed to switch positions in order to get away from a manager, Buck Showalter, who was tired of his act – and who ordered him to stop speaking Spanish in the clubhouse – to join a team whose manager, Joe Torre, was becoming legendary (then) for making guys feel comfortable, etc.

      Also, he agreed to switch positions because the only team that could affford him – without him having his contract restructed – already had a SS and agreeing to play 3B was the only way he was going to be able to join the team.

      In summary, A-Rod switched positons, from SS to 3B, because it was good for A-Rod and his pocketbook (and his mental state) – not because he was being a team player.

    18. MJ Recanati
      May 6th, 2010 | 3:47 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      In summary, A-Rod switched positons, from SS to 3B, because it was good for A-Rod and his pocketbook (and his mental state) – not because he was being a team player.

      Just listen to yourself sometimes…

      This could be argued on behalf of just about every single decision over the history of time. Acting in self-interest AND also being a team player are not mutually exclusive states of being. Every choice is weighed against the opportunity cost of another choice. A-Rod made his choices which, while they had an obvious impact on behalf of his own self-interest, he nevertheless made a choice to sacrifice going down in baseball history as the best shortstop ever. That may not mean anything to you but it nevertheless represents a sacrifice.

    19. May 6th, 2010 | 3:51 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      …he nevertheless made a choice to sacrifice going down in baseball history as the best shortstop ever. That may not mean anything to you but it nevertheless represents a sacrifice.

      You make an assumption here that he would have remained at SS, nonetheless. However, many, seeing the bulk that A-Rod has added to his frame since 2003, believe that he had one, maybe two, years left at SS at the time of the trade before the 2004 season. He’s a very large man – and has been since 2004. It’s highly doubtful, again, to many, that he had many years left at SS…

    20. May 6th, 2010 | 4:13 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      However, many, seeing the bulk that A-Rod has added to his frame since 2003, believe that he had one…

      Who’s the “many”? Are they scouts, players, bloggers, executives, baseball analysts, Hall of Fame players, etc? Just curious.

    21. May 6th, 2010 | 4:15 pm

      @ Brent:
      All of the above. I’ve seen and heard it in many places – fans, analysts, broadcasters, etc.

    22. throwstrikes
      May 6th, 2010 | 4:28 pm

      It was in A-Rod’s best interest to join the Yankees. It was in the Yankees best interest to get him. But you cant make the argument that it was in the teams best interest to not put him at SS.

      The Yankees put Jeter’s feelings over what was in the best interest of the team and that pattern was repeated from 2004-2007 with Joe Torre’s blessing.

    23. May 6th, 2010 | 6:00 pm

      @ MJ Recanati: @ Steve Lombardi:

      Hmmmm. It’s true A-Rod did want out of Texas. But that doesn’t make him giving up being shortstop any less magnanimous, or any less of a team player. And he already had endorsements in Texas. So the idea that he moved up to the Yankees to get a Pepsi commercial is kind of weak.

      Besides, he moved from a state with no income tax and a low cost of living to a state with a state (and city) income tax and a high cost of living. I can tell you from personal experience (I moved from Texas to New York in 2000) that it is a huge difference in expenses on EVERYTHING. And even though athletes all have places in Florida so that they can avoid state taxes somewhat, they still have to pay some NY taxes. So I doubt he made a dime more than what he was getting in Texas, when all is said and done, and very likely ended up with less money, even with that Pepsi commercial Steve cites.

      Besides, if you remember, he was willing to take a PAY CUT to do so with the aborted trade to the Red Sox, which kind of belies Steve’s point about him being greedy.

      At any rate, if you want to talk self-interest, the very first thing Derek Jeter is reported to have said when he heard that A-Rod was coming to the Yankees was “I’m not moving from shortstop.” Just saying.

    24. May 6th, 2010 | 6:30 pm

      @ throwstrikes:
      Yeah, I saw somebody say the other day, regarding Torre and horses, that he had a terrific exacta with Jeter and A-Rod. Too bad he only wagered on the favorite.

    25. Corey Italiano
      May 6th, 2010 | 7:05 pm

      First off, he should get suspended because of this video. He said that things were going to have to happen out of the respect for his teammates and the game. Basically that means he’s going to start hitting people. Suspend him, someone will get hurt.

      Secondly, this guy is a moron. He says he’s playing a game for a living and you can’t take a game too seriously but, within the same breath, he’s flipping out ready to fight A-Rod for running on the mound. Give me a break and the shut the hell up already.

    26. MJ Recanati
      May 6th, 2010 | 7:33 pm

      @ lisaswan:
      @ Steve Lombardi:
      @ Everyone:

      Here’s the bottom line that everyone seems to forget: baseball players earn their living by playing baseball. This is their occupation, not some hobby or diversion in the way it is for us. The notion that ALL of these players aren’t motivated by self-interest is preposterous. Do we all not make decisions in our work lives out of pure self-interest?

      It is idiotic to bash A-Rod as some lone wolf when the majority of his teammates are millionaires. It is idiotic to paint A-Rod as “playing only for himself” when corporate sponsors offer him commercials as the newest member of the New York Yankees.

      That A-Rod is well-compensated doesn’t make him in it for himself. That A-Rod’s personality isn’t that of Tony Gwynn’s also doesn’t mean that he’s only in it for himself.

      This is just one more example of a double-standard in how we perceive A-Rod. It’s absurd that this conversation has to keep happening. At what point do you all not exhaust yourselves with the perpetual moving target on A-Rod’s back?

      This site has grown tiresome. It beats the same stupid drum over and over. The words, the arguments and the logic may always change but it still comes to the same conclusions over and over. An honest question to those that hate Alex Rodriguez: if A-Rod is such a bad person, such a bad teammate and so universally hated by his peers, why don’t you people just stop talking about him or thinking about him? An unyielding, obsessive focus on on the thing you hate most is a sure sign of mental illness.

    27. Raf
      May 6th, 2010 | 9:23 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      But, it’s just interesting that you never hear about players like Tony Gwynn, Albert Pujlos, George Brett, Ryan Howard, Robin Yount and Ryan Zimmerman as being called “me” players

      Not true about Tony Gwynn, Jack Clark and Pags took him on when they were with the Padres.

    28. 77yankees
      May 6th, 2010 | 10:49 pm

      @ Raf:

      Never heard that one before. Pags doesn’t strike me as that type.

      Jack Clark? Well, he’s just a d–k head anyway.

    29. May 8th, 2010 | 10:24 am

      @ MJ Recanati:

      An honest question to those that hate Alex Rodriguez: if A-Rod is such a bad person, such a bad teammate and so universally hated by his peers, why don’t you people just stop talking about him or thinking about him? An unyielding, obsessive focus on on the thing you hate most is a sure sign of mental illness.

      http://www.northjersey.com/sports/pro_sports/baseball/klapisch/050810_A-Rod_wont_allow_Braden_to_bother_him.html

      If he was really hated, his teammates wouldn’t come out like CC and Jeter did to beat the pesky fly down.

      CC’s quote was the best: “He’s a clown,” CC Sabathia said of Braden. “Guy says he’s from the 209, what the [bleep] is that? That’s where I’m from and I don’t know what he’s talking about. Two-oh-nine. He needs to just calm down – put that in the paper. That’s just tired.”

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