• Shopping In Seattle – Sherman: Yanks Close To Trade For Cliff Lee

    Posted by on July 9th, 2010 · Comments (43)

    The Yankees picked up their league leading 54th win and sixth in a row in Seattle last night, but according to the New York Post’s Joel Sherman that’s not all they have their eye on.

    Take it away Joel:

    The Knicks didn’t get LeBron James, but the Yankees were on the brink of obtaining Cliff Lee late last night for a package that would include top prospect Jesus Montero, the Post has learned.

    Sherman also fingers minor league second baseman David Adams (.309/.393/.507 and injured since May) as a potential trade chit.

    The rationale, according to Sherman, is that A.J. Burnett and Javier Vazquez can’t be trusted – especially in the postseason – and picking up Lee lets Cashman dangle Javy for prospects.

    Personally, I’d rather see of Montero turns into something – he’s been hitting better in Scranton as of  late – or have the Yankees focus their attentions on adding a bat.

    However, it’s hard not to like Lee and its more than likely that Austin Romine has passed Montero for the title of Successor to Jorge in the eyes of some in the organization. And it’d be especially nice if they could pull this off before game time tonight, since Lee is the Mariners’ scheduled starter.

    (h/t: Yahoo’s Big League Stew)

       

    Steve Lombardi’s add-on: Hey, I thought, as per many, that the Yankees and Brian Cashman didn’t believe in trading top prospects for a player who they would then have to pay big bucks to keep – when they could just pay the money a few months later and sign the player as a free agent (and keep their prospects)?

    If this deal goes down, then, well, I guess that “line” can be retired, huh?

    Update 10:36 am EST: Buster_ESPNExecutive involved in Cliff Lee talks: The Yankees-Mariners deal “is just about done.” 

    Comments on Shopping In Seattle – Sherman: Yanks Close To Trade For Cliff Lee

    1. July 9th, 2010 | 7:46 am

      Sean beat me by a minute in posting this news! ;-)
      Nice job Sean. And, thanks to Evan for sharing some links on this as well in the comments of another entry.

    2. Garcia
      July 9th, 2010 | 8:41 am

      @ Steve
      You really look at things as black-and-white, that may be Cash’s preference but that doesn’t mean it’s a rule written in stone. This is simple, you adjust your line of thinking from something you won’t do, to something you’ll consider, to something you’ll actually go ahead with. It’s an evolution. And that doesn’t mean that rule still doesn’t apply, even if in one instance you go against it.

      I agree with some of your criticism of Cash, I just don’t think he’s as awful as you make him out to be, but he does make mistakes and he also does some things well. All in all, I still feel the Yanks are ahead of the curve with Cash as GM than w/o Cash. You don’t feel that way, that’s fine.

      Why do I get the feeling that no matter what Cashman does then you will still go against the man, am I wrong? I remember you commenting one time that you’ll forgive Cashman if he can bring home a championship, he does bring home a championship, but then you turn up the volume some more on your criticism of Cash. I understand the moves that you don’t like, Nick Johnson, Javy and Grandy, no Matsui and no Damon, but the season isn’t over yet AND the Yanks have the best record in the majors before the all-star break. However, that’s still not good enough for you.

      If you are not judging Cashman based on team record or championships, then what exactly are you judging Cashman on?

      The other follow-up I have is, do you think Cashman tries to make the team better or he purposely tries to suck? You make it sound like the man loves to be wrong with any and all acquisitions he makes. The thing is, some of the things you critique are very legitimate but where you lose me is when EVERYTHING he does is going to destroy the team.

    3. bfriley76
      July 9th, 2010 | 8:52 am

      Totally spit-balling here guys, but if this deal IS made (not a huge fan btw) could this precede a potential move for a bat? Say, maybe a deal involving Javy for say Jason Werth?

    4. clintfsu813
      July 9th, 2010 | 8:54 am

      I gotta give credit for the way they’ve been handling our minor league players IF this deal happens. The ability to possibly lose Montero, but still have guys like Romine and Sanchez makes me feel a little better about losing the baby Jesus.

    5. Garcia
      July 9th, 2010 | 8:54 am

      Oh yeah, with all that said, I’m not sure exactly how I feel about this move. I feel like Montero may turn out to be a player like Miguel Cabrera or Glenallen Hill. I don’t think he’s going to be a bust, but I don’t know where he falls with regard to him being a shining star or a dimly lit one.

      I don’t like hearing stories about him being benched because of attitude. I always consider that a huge red flag, a sense of entitlement is always bad – whether it’s someone in your office, a driver next to you, or a teammate on the field, I feel that never (usually) ends will for the person who feels entitled.

    6. clintfsu813
      July 9th, 2010 | 8:56 am

      @ Garcia:
      Good point about the possible attitude problem. That may be why Cash is more willing to let go of him.

    7. MJ Recanati
      July 9th, 2010 | 8:58 am

      Garcia wrote:

      don’t like hearing stories about him being benched because of attitude. I always consider that a huge red flag, a sense of entitlement is always bad – whether it’s someone in your office, a driver next to you, or a teammate on the field, I feel that never (usually) ends will for the person who feels entitled.

      He’s 20 years old and experiencing failure for the first time. These are men, not robots. There’s nothing that says immature behavior at age 20 means immature behavior at age 25.

    8. Garcia
      July 9th, 2010 | 9:09 am

      @MJ I don’t know, I think you are born with the right attitude to be part of a team or you are not. Gary Sheffield has always been a me-first type of player, he’s not one to concede to anyone, I don’t think he changed much from when he was 20 to his present age. Doesn’t mean you can’t win with a guy like that, but when things go bad he’s not the type of guy you want in your corner because he’s always looking out for himself.

      I just feel those types of things aren’t like when you are 20 you can’t hit a big league curveball, but then when you are 25 you learned to hit one. That’s a skill and I understand that takes time, but attitude and ego….I think you have it or you don’t. It just doesn’t go away. That kind of attitude comes with upbringing and discipline.

      Now, I don’t know the entire story about Montero but when I hear he gets disciplined for not running out balls then I find to be a big red flag. Color me Hugo Chavez then, but I think you owe it to your team to always try hard. That’s not something that requires talent, and that was more my point.

    9. Corey Italiano
      July 9th, 2010 | 9:10 am

      Attitude problems do not matter at all.

      Who here would say no to Hanley Ramirez cause of his attitude?

    10. Corey Italiano
      July 9th, 2010 | 9:11 am

      Either way, I think this is a stupid move.

    11. BOHAN
      July 9th, 2010 | 9:14 am

      im not a fan of this trade… never a big fan of giving up a young talent like montero, even if he might be aittle inept defensively, for a guy that yor going to get for one year and then pay him even more money the next year… let him go somewhere else like minnesota… most likely if were going to play them its going to be in ALDS and well only have to seem him once cause he wont go on 3 days rest and the rest of their staff isnt that great… if im the mariners im lookin at mnnesota and their catching prospect over montero suposedly almost as good of a bat and much better defensively

    12. MJ Recanati
      July 9th, 2010 | 9:15 am

      @ Garcia:
      Two words: Roger Federer.

      Among the worst-behaved spoiled brats in tennis became the classiest (and greatest) champion of his generation.

      Gary Sheffield is one example of perpetual immaturity and Roger Federer is one example of maturation and personal growth. Given that there are examples on either side it is clearly foolish to believe that Montero can only be one thing and not another. We don’t know what Montero’s personality will be like with more time, nurturing and development so it’s silly to posit that a personality today must remain constant forever.

      Nevertheless, as Corey said, attitude is overrated. The Yanks would be better off with Hanley Ramirez than they are without him and he’s no saint.

    13. July 9th, 2010 | 9:17 am

      @ Garcia:

      For the record, if the Yankees make this move, I have no issue with it. Montero, at best, is Paul Konerko. And, with the Yankees, he’s blocked at 1B by Tex. And, if he’s a catcher, Romine is a head of him as a total prospect. Adams may be a nice player too. But, he’s blocked by Cano.

      My comment of “time to put this line to rest” is not aimed at Cashman. More so, it’s aimed at all the fans of Cashman who used this line to explain why he didn’t trade for Santana, Sabathia, etc. Clearly, if the Yankees make this move, you – rather, anyone – cannot claim that they didn’t do the Santana deal because it’s against the Yankees M.O. to trade top prospects for a player who’s near free agency. Because, that’s what they’re doing here, now.

      That’s all. It’s more of a response to the DOC (Defenders of Cashman) as to their claim why he’s a genius for not trading prospects for a high priced FA to be. Again, if he makes this move, then it shows that he is willing to make this kind of a move and all that BS that’s been said by him, and his fans, about not trading top prospects is just that – crap. See Austin Jackson for Granderson too.

    14. Garcia
      July 9th, 2010 | 9:28 am

      @MJ Tennis, seriously? That’s not even a team sport.

      I’ve played a lot of team sports. I’ve seen guys with all the talent in the world ruined by attitude, you may think it’s overrated but I certainly don’t. I’ve seen people 20 years old have a lack of effort, do the same when they are 25, 30, 35, then they point fingers at this coach or that coach, blah, blah. You can consider it overrated, but there are parks in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan, Staten Island, all over the continental United States, Dominican Republic, etc, filled with baseball players that failed because of attitude.

      Eventually you’ll become exposed, either your talent is so much greater than the crappy attitude you have, so people are willing to work with you, or the attitude surpasses your talent and what you bring to the table, therefore causing the patience of others to wear out.

      We can banter about this till the cows come home, but I’ve seen it enough to know that attitude is NOT overrated.

    15. Corey Italiano
      July 9th, 2010 | 9:37 am

      @ Garcia:
      So you wouldn’t take Hanley?

    16. BOHAN
      July 9th, 2010 | 9:37 am

      @ Garcia:
      i think you get montero around guys like jeter posada pettite mo teix swish… i think they all put him in his place and knock his ego or attitude dont a notch and he changes his attitude around

    17. Corey Italiano
      July 9th, 2010 | 9:40 am

      Heck what about Paul O’Neil? Didn’t everyone say he had an attitude problem?

    18. July 9th, 2010 | 9:42 am

      In response to Steve’s “Editor’s Note,” let me just say I have no problem trading kids for a rental.

      The idea of stockpiling and developing a farm system is to bolster the major league club and prospects can do that in two ways: 1) fill immediate holes on the major league club (Gardener, Hughes, Robertson, Curtis, Pena, etc..) and 2) as currency to purchase other parts (Austin Jackson buys Curtis Granderson, Arodys Vizcaino helps buy Javier Vazquez.

      Neither of these uses is superior or inferior, right or wrong, they are just different sides of the same coin.

    19. ken
      July 9th, 2010 | 9:58 am

      This would be an embarrassment of riches. I would rather see Lee on the Twins and have an exciting playoff series. I say win or lose with the current lineup, perhaps with some tweaks at the margins.

      Though I will say this: if the Mets had competent ownership and GM, they would trade whatever it takes to get Lee which would almost guarantee a playoff spot and then anything is possible.

    20. MJ Recanati
      July 9th, 2010 | 9:59 am

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      My comment of “time to put this line to rest” is not aimed at Cashman. More so, it’s aimed at all the fans of Cashman who used this line to explain why he didn’t trade for Santana, Sabathia, etc. Clearly, if the Yankees make this move, you – rather, anyone – cannot claim that they didn’t do the Santana deal because it’s against the Yankees M.O. to trade top prospects for a player who’s near free agency. Because, that’s what they’re doing here, now.

      So, what, fans would be proven wrong after the fact re: Santana trade if Cashman makes this deal now? What sort of twisted logic is that? Cashman himself said that he didn’t want to pay twice for Santana (money/prospects) and, in comments made re: Sabathia, implied that the decision to avoid “double-taxation” with Santana was based on the fact that Sabathia would be available.

      So how would “that line” go out the window if Cashman executes this trade? It’s called changing course depending on circumstances.

    21. Garcia
      July 9th, 2010 | 10:08 am

      @Ken I hear you, but wouldn’t they scream anyway about Yankee riches? If that’s the case, then why care?

    22. July 9th, 2010 | 10:29 am

      On of the more interesting things about this deal, to me, is what the corresponding move would be…

      - move Hughes to the pen?
      - trade Vazquez?

      If it’s not one of those two, then it’s go with a 6 man rotation – which I don’t see them doing.

    23. MJ Recanati
      July 9th, 2010 | 10:32 am

      @ Garcia:
      Ever made a mistake in your life when you were a younger guy that, through reflection and maturity, you realize was your own fault? If you had/have that capacity for change then there’s no reason why Montero can’t also have that capacity.

      Harping on all the bad guys in sports still doesn’t make your viewpoint correct. There ARE people that have changed, even in sports.

      Incidentally, the range of personalities in sports is entirely contrived and scripted. You either have your saints (Jeter) or your villains (Bonds) and no one accepts that even the good guys have bad sides and the bad guys aren’t all bad. Montero could be as moody and selfish as Manny Ramirez or Gary Sheffield but even THEY have their good traits as much as we don’t like to admit it.

    24. MJ Recanati
      July 9th, 2010 | 10:42 am

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      Given Hughes’s innings limit, they could move him to the bullpen or have the freedom to skip him a few more times.

      Then again, if the Javy-for-Werth rumor is to be believed, the Yanks could improve by adding Werth to compensate for the lack of offense the team has endured thus far this year. The best part of aquiring Werth would be the fact that he is sure to be a Type A free agent and his $7M salary in 2010 makes him extremely likely to want to seek a long-term deal on the open market over taking a one-year deal to stay in New York for $9M or so.

      Given the depth of the 2011 draft class, the Yanks could have their own pick and compensation picks for Werth, all without having to sign Lee from Seattle and give up a pick to do so.

      This could reflect Cashman’s abandonment of recent strategems in favor of a more fluid style of management when the market dictates it. If it goes down this way then it actually might be Cashman’s most brilliant move ever.

    25. July 9th, 2010 | 10:48 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      If it goes down this way then it actually might be Cashman’s most brilliant move ever.

      More brillant than the signing of Kei Igawa and Carl Pavano? More brillant than the recent Nick Johson deal? More brillant than the trades for Jeff Weaver and Curtis Granderson? I dunno…Cashman has so many brilliant moves…it’s so hard to say one is the “most brilliant move ever.” ;-)

    26. Evan3457
      July 9th, 2010 | 10:52 am

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      @ Garcia:
      For the record, if the Yankees make this move, I have no issue with it. Montero, at best, is Paul Konerko. And, with the Yankees, he’s blocked at 1B by Tex. And, if he’s a catcher, Romine is a head of him as a total prospect. Adams may be a nice player too. But, he’s blocked by Cano.
      My comment of “time to put this line to rest” is not aimed at Cashman. More so, it’s aimed at all the fans of Cashman who used this line to explain why he didn’t trade for Santana, Sabathia, etc. Clearly, if the Yankees make this move, you – rather, anyone – cannot claim that they didn’t do the Santana deal because it’s against the Yankees M.O. to trade top prospects for a player who’s near free agency. Because, that’s what they’re doing here, now.
      That’s all. It’s more of a response to the DOC (Defenders of Cashman) as to their claim why he’s a genius for not trading prospects for a high priced FA to be. Again, if he makes this move, then it shows that he is willing to make this kind of a move and all that BS that’s been said by him, and his fans, about not trading top prospects is just that – crap. See Austin Jackson for Granderson too.

      Easily done, Steve.
      Cashman was in on Santana as long as the Sox were. When they dropped out, so did he. The Yanks wanted Sabathia and Hughes over Santana, and they were fine with Santana going to the Mets. And they were right in the long run.

      Cashman was in on Lee last year until the Phillies became front runners. He was in on Halladay in the off season until the Phillies became front runners. He even offered Montero for Halladay or Lee, until both pitchers went places not likely to hurt the Yankees.

      However, the Rays got seriously involved this week. The Yanks don’t want to face a rotation of Lee, Price, Garza, Niemann and Shields; not for a playoff spot, not in a potential ALCS matchup. (Same if Lee goes to Texas or Minnesota, but to a lesser extent.)

      Changed circumstances demand changed thinking, or at least re-thinking a previously held position. If circumstances change, and you don’t change your thinking to accommodate them, you’re doomed.

      There are two possibilities:

      1) The Yanks mean to acquire Lee, or
      2) This is an elaborate, expensive bluff, designed to make the price for Lee so prohibitive, especially to Rays, that they drop out, or pay double what they would’ve.

      In either case, it’s good for the Yankees in the short term.

      By the way, you should read some of the commentary in the Trade for Lee thread at River Ave. Blues. They completely disagree with your assessment of Montero, and most of them are violently against this trade.

      Me? I dunno. Hate giving up Montero; I think he’s going to be a great hitter. Would also hate to have to fact Lee on one of our rivals, both this off-season, and for the next several years.

    27. Evan3457
      July 9th, 2010 | 10:54 am

      Oh, and you downplayed Austin Jackson as any sort of big prospect several times last season, so I don’t think it’s “cricket” to upgrade him back, retroactively, just to show how awful Cashman is.

    28. Evan3457
      July 9th, 2010 | 10:55 am

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      MJ Recanati wrote:
      If it goes down this way then it actually might be Cashman’s most brilliant move ever.
      More brillant than the signing of Kei Igawa and Carl Pavano? More brillant than the recent Nick Johson deal? More brillant than the trades for Jeff Weaver and Curtis Granderson? I dunno…Cashman has so many brilliant moves…it’s so hard to say one is the “most brilliant move ever.”

      I wouldn’t be so quick to “count coup” on the Granderson deal, Steve.

    29. bfriley76
      July 9th, 2010 | 10:57 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      Given Hughes’s innings limit, they could move him to the bullpen or have the freedom to skip him a few more times.
      Then again, if the Javy-for-Werth rumor is to be believed, the Yanks could improve by adding Werth to compensate for the lack of offense the team has endured thus far this year. The best part of aquiring Werth would be the fact that he is sure to be a Type A free agent and his $7M salary in 2010 makes him extremely likely to want to seek a long-term deal on the open market over taking a one-year deal to stay in New York for $9M or so.
      Given the depth of the 2011 draft class, the Yanks could have their own pick and compensation picks for Werth, all without having to sign Lee from Seattle and give up a pick to do so.
      This could reflect Cashman’s abandonment of recent strategems in favor of a more fluid style of management when the market dictates it. If it goes down this way then it actually might be Cashman’s most brilliant move ever.

      I’m still wary of trading a bat that projects as high as Montero, but if things play out this way, it’s kind of hard not to really like the deal(s).

    30. bfriley76
      July 9th, 2010 | 11:01 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      Given Hughes’s innings limit, they could move him to the bullpen or have the freedom to skip him a few more times.
      Then again, if the Javy-for-Werth rumor is to be believed, the Yanks could improve by adding Werth to compensate for the lack of offense the team has endured thus far this year. The best part of aquiring Werth would be the fact that he is sure to be a Type A free agent and his $7M salary in 2010 makes him extremely likely to want to seek a long-term deal on the open market over taking a one-year deal to stay in New York for $9M or so.
      Given the depth of the 2011 draft class, the Yanks could have their own pick and compensation picks for Werth, all without having to sign Lee from Seattle and give up a pick to do so.
      This could reflect Cashman’s abandonment of recent strategems in favor of a more fluid style of management when the market dictates it. If it goes down this way then it actually might be Cashman’s most brilliant move ever.

      And if things go down this way, it seems like the type of deal (or series of deals) that Theo always gets lauded for.

    31. Garcia
      July 9th, 2010 | 11:15 am

      @MJ

      Ever made a mistake in your life when you were a younger guy that, through reflection and maturity, you realize was your own fault?

      Yes, I have.

      But, have you ever worked with anyone who feels they are ‘owed’ something and/or don’t have to try as hard? Basically, they feel entitled and don’t think the same rules apply to them.

      I have no way of knowing what Montero’s character is about, but, like I said, I consider not running out a grounder to be a huge offense. Doesn’t mean I don’t want him to do well but these kind of things have a way of coming back, time will tell — since we both don’t know anything about this guy.

    32. MJ Recanati
      July 9th, 2010 | 11:16 am

      bfriley76 wrote:

      And if things go down this way, it seems like the type of deal (or series of deals) that Theo always gets lauded for.

      Indeed.

      One of the ways where I think Theo is a great GM is how he manages (or massages) the arbitration process. I have no idea if compensation picks are part of the equation in any Lee and Werth trades but, if so, then we might be seeing Cashman playing more like Theo.

    33. MJ Recanati
      July 9th, 2010 | 11:25 am

      @ Garcia:
      Robbie Cano didn’t run out a grounder on 9/14/08 vs. Tampa and was benched by Girardi immediately thereafter. I’d say Robbie Cano has grown from it, wouldn’t you?

      I’m not saying not running hard isn’t a big deal. What I’m saying is that it’s preposterous to take this offense and hold it over someone’s head forever, projecting a future of similar misdeeds because of it. Let’s all wait and see if Montero is as much of a miscreant as everyone says he is. He made a mistake, as millions have.

    34. Raf
      July 9th, 2010 | 11:44 am

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      My comment of “time to put this line to rest” is not aimed at Cashman. More so, it’s aimed at all the fans of Cashman who used this line to explain why he didn’t trade for Santana, Sabathia, etc. Clearly, if the Yankees make this move, you – rather, anyone – cannot claim that they didn’t do the Santana deal because it’s against the Yankees M.O. to trade top prospects for a player who’s near free agency. Because, that’s what they’re doing here, now.

      That they say this is the reason, doesn’t necessarily make it so. Maybe they were in on it, maybe they weren’t, maybe they couldn’t justify the cost to make the deal.

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      What I’m saying is that it’s preposterous to take this offense and hold it over someone’s head forever, projecting a future of similar misdeeds because of it.

      I don’t think that’s the case, I think Garcia’s kinda mentioning it as a “heads-up” if you will. Maybe something will develop from it, maybe not. As you say we’ll all have to wait and see.

    35. Raf
      July 9th, 2010 | 11:47 am

      For all they’re giving up, I would hope that they’re planning on signing Lee to an extension. FWIW, it seems that Lee is amenable to signing an extension, if reports from Seattle are accurate.

    36. Raf
      July 9th, 2010 | 11:54 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Then again, if the Javy-for-Werth rumor is to be believed, the Yanks could improve by adding Werth to compensate for the lack of offense the team has endured thus far this year.

      I dunno about lack of offense, as the Yanks are 5 runs short of the Red Sox for the ML lead in runs scored.

      Having said that, I welcome any improvement to the offense.

    37. July 9th, 2010 | 11:56 am

      Raf wrote:

      For all they’re giving up, I would hope that they’re planning on signing Lee to an extension. FWIW, it seems that Lee is amenable to signing an extension, if reports from Seattle are accurate.

      See Jeter and Mo. Yanks don’t sign FAs to be during the season.

    38. Raf
      July 9th, 2010 | 12:01 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      See Jeter and Mo. Yanks don’t sign FAs to be during the season.

      The circumstances are a bit different between Jeter, Rivera and Lee.

    39. clintfsu813
      July 9th, 2010 | 12:03 pm

      The Yanks know that no one will outbid them in the offseason. No reason to sign extension now.

    40. Raf
      July 9th, 2010 | 12:09 pm

      @ clintfsu813:
      I’m not worried about them being outbid, it could be that Lee won’t go to the highest bidder.

      Granted, it’s the Yanks and they play on a different level than the rest of MLB, but to deal a package for Lee then to let him either walk or pay out the nose for him seems a bit excessive.

    41. clintfsu813
      July 9th, 2010 | 12:26 pm

      @ Raf:
      You and I both know, the Yanks always get their man.

    42. Jake1
      July 9th, 2010 | 2:07 pm

      this was the no brainer move of the yr

    43. July 14th, 2010 | 2:38 pm

      An interesting related thing on LoHud today:

      Obviously the Cliff Lee trade didn’t work out for the Yankees, but the fact that they were in on him to begin with was particularly interesting since a few years ago – when Johan Santana was the ace on the market – the Yankees passed. Their reason? They didn’t want to pay twice – once with players, once with cash.

      So what changed this time? Brian Cashman said the Yankees situation now, as opposed to then, was almost completely different. “I didn’t think we were one player away from winning it all with Santana,” Cashman told me today. “And I didn’t think our system was prepared for the deal. This team is a lot deeper and stronger, both on the 25 and the system below.”

      “We were building towards something that ultimately culminated in a championship down the road at the time the Santana deal presented itself,” Cashman said, “and the truth was that we just were not in a position to do a four-for-one at that time.”

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.