• Rocket To Be Indicted (Updated)

    Posted by on August 19th, 2010 · Comments (11)

    So sayeth the Old Grey Lady

    Federal authorities have decided to indict Roger Clemens on charges of making false statements to Congress about his use of performance-enhancing drugs, according to two people briefed on the matter.

    The indictment comes nearly two and half years after Clemens and his former trainer Brian McNamee testified under oath at a hearing before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, directly contradicting each other about whether Clemens had used the banned substances.

    I’m no lawyer, but I’ve heard that perjury is a very tough case to prove, so I’d be curious just how far this goes.

    Regardless, we can all say that Congress has better things to do (and they do), but the real takeaway here is this: It is never the crime that kills you, it is the cover up.

    Andy Pettitte and Clemens were both essentially in the same spot – fingered by the Mitchell Report as possible PED-users. Pettitte stood up apologized and told his story. Clemens stood up and pointed the finger at everyone else, took it to court and stomped around daring the world to prove it.

    In their obituaries, PEDs might figure in the fourth or fifth paragraph of Pettitte’s, but its likely to be the first line in Rocket’s as a result.

    Update: Below for all you legal eagles is the indictment. It would appear that “Strength Coach #1″ is McNamee, “Player #1″ is Jose Canseco and Andy Pettitte is referred to in the indictment as “a former Yankees teammate” who “misheard or misremembered.”

    Roger Clemens Obstruction Indictment

    Comments on Rocket To Be Indicted (Updated)

    1. YankCrank
      August 19th, 2010 | 1:31 pm

      Well-written Sean.

      I wish Clemens just stood up and told the truth from the start. I think we’d all agree on that.

    2. MJ Recanati
      August 19th, 2010 | 2:39 pm

      YankCrank wrote:

      Well-written Sean.

      Yep.

      YankCrank wrote:

      I wish Clemens just stood up and told the truth from the start. I think we’d all agree on that.

      That too.

      Sean McNally wrote:

      Regardless, we can all say that Congress has better things to do (and they do), but the real takeaway here is this: It is never the crime that kills you, it is the cover up.

      Absolutely right, on both counts.

    3. YankCrank
      August 19th, 2010 | 3:15 pm

      *Off topic

      For those of you not paying attention, the Yanks are absolutely dropping the hammer this afternoon. Nine runs and counting in the 6th, 11-2 Bombers.

    4. Raf
      August 19th, 2010 | 4:20 pm

      YankCrank wrote:

      I wish Clemens just stood up and told the truth from the start. I think we’d all agree on that.

      Especially since there’s nothing to lose by telling the truth. Oh well, he’s retired, so he has more than enough time to play in court.

    5. Evan3457
      August 19th, 2010 | 5:03 pm

      Raf wrote:

      YankCrank wrote:
      I wish Clemens just stood up and told the truth from the start. I think we’d all agree on that.
      Especially since there’s nothing to lose by telling the truth. Oh well, he’s retired, so he has more than enough time to play in court.

      His first ballot Hall of Fame selection was there to lose. But it’ll be lost now anyway.

      I have not much sympathy for Roger; he did all this to himself. And I agree the Congress had no business setting perjury traps for ballplayers, just because they can.

      But this is on Roger, not them.

    6. Raf
      August 19th, 2010 | 5:17 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      His first ballot Hall of Fame selection was there to lose. But it’ll be lost now anyway.

      As soon as his name was mentioned, his 1st ballot HoF selection was lost.

    7. redbug
      August 19th, 2010 | 5:49 pm

      This wasn’t a perjury trap. Clemens wasn’t under subpoena. He insisted on testifying.

      This according to the AP:

      Former Rep. Tom Davis of Virginia, who was the top Republican on the House panel at the time of the baseball star’s testimony, called the indictment “a self-inflicted wound” by Clemens.

      “Clemens was not under subpoena. He came voluntarily. He wanted to come to the committee and clear his name,” Davis said. “And I sat there in the office with (committee chairman) Henry Waxman and said, ‘Whatever you do, don’t lie.’”

      Davis added: “I did not want to refer this to Justice, but we didn’t have any choice.”

      The former congressman said Clemens “got caught in a speed trap, basically. He could have just let it go, but he denied it vociferously before Congress. Several times, we gave him the opportunity to back down, and he didn’t.”

    8. Evan3457
      August 19th, 2010 | 6:06 pm

      redbug wrote:

      This wasn’t a perjury trap. Clemens wasn’t under subpoena. He insisted on testifying.

      That’s right. I forgot about that. He was in the Mitchell Report, and wanted to use the Congress to strike back.

      I was thinking of the appalling hearing with Palmeiro, Sosa, McGwire, Tejada and Schilling, I guess.

    9. 77yankees
      August 19th, 2010 | 6:14 pm

      You can say that for the last 30 years, Clemens had been pampered and allowed to bully his way into what he always wanted. So in that respect it’s coming back to bite him like karma.

      But isn’t this whole charade about another bunch of elected bullies – in suits – trying to make themselves look like the the fake sheriff in all this?

    10. Evan3457
      August 19th, 2010 | 10:19 pm

      77yankees wrote:

      You can say that for the last 30 years, Clemens had been pampered and allowed to bully his way into what he always wanted. So in that respect it’s coming back to bite him like karma.
      But isn’t this whole charade about another bunch of elected bullies – in suits – trying to make themselves look like the the fake sheriff in all this?

      Well, yeah.

      But aside from the moralism, I don’t like the idea of Congressmen hauling a group of citizens before a committee on such a trivial matter and basically forcing them to either strip their own reputations to the bone, or commit perjury.

      Organized Crime? Check.
      Governmental Corruption, Fraud and Waste? You bet.
      Abuse of Power? Absolutely.
      Corporate or Union Crime and/or coverup? Yes.
      Medical Policy? Military Procurement? Internet or Electrical Grid Security? That’s what they’re there for.

      But steroid abuse? C’mon. That’s for local prosecutors of the Federal District Attorneys. What’s next; hauling a bunch of drivers before a committee and asking them if they ever speeded or ran a stop sign?

    11. Raf
      August 19th, 2010 | 11:03 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      What’s next; hauling a bunch of drivers before a committee and asking them if they ever speeded or ran a stop sign

      SHHHHHHHHH! Don’t give them any ideas

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