• Yankees 2011 Catching Rotation

    Posted by on September 4th, 2010 · Comments (16)

    A case could be made that both Jesus Montero and Austin Romine deserve promotions to “the next level” in 2011. For sure, I would like to see Romine at AAA to see how he stacks up there. But, if you do move up Austin, and don’t move Jesus, that would cut into Montero’s catching time at Triple-A.

    So, how about this?

    Promote both Montero and Romine next season – with Jesus joining the Yankees and Austin going to Scranton.

    And, then, at the big league level, have a “catching rotation” that works like this:

    Game 1: Posada catches, Montero is the DH, and Cervelli sits.
    Game 2: Montero catches, Posada is the DH, and Cervelli sits.
    Game 3: Cervelli catches, Posada is the DH, and Montero sits.
    Game 4: Posada catches, Montero is the DH, and Cervelli sits.
    Game 5: Montero catches, Someone other than Posada is the DH, and Cervelli sits.
    Game 6: Cervelli catches, Posada is the DH, and Montero sits.

    And, then just keep repeating this rotation, over and over again.

    This way, Posada, Montero and Cervelli each end up catching 54 games next season – and, no one catches two days in a row. That’s good for Posada’s aging body and for hiding Montero’s defensive shortcomings. And, Posada gets another 81 games in at DH – giving him 135 starts on the season (which is about the right number for him). Also, Montero gets to play in another 54 games at DH – giving him a total of 108 games in the majors next season. Plus, you could always use Montero as a PH for Cervelli in a big spot – giving him some more PAs next season.

    Makes sense, right?

    Comments on Yankees 2011 Catching Rotation

    1. MJ Recanati
      September 4th, 2010 | 10:10 am

      Makes sense, right?
      ————-
      Actually, no, it doesn’t make sense at all. There’s no benefit to carrying three catchers on the 25-man roster.

      Romine and Montero shared catching duties at High-A for the first two-thirds of the 2009 season so they can certainly do so again in 2011.

      I’d return both Romine and Montero to their respective clubs to start the 2011 season, then, around June 1st (after the arbitration clock deadline is passed), promote Montero to the big leagues and move Romine up to AAA. I’m sure that by June 1, 2011, Posada will once again be injured, at which point Montero can become Cervelli’s backup and a part-time DH.

      Breaking camp with three catchers out of 25 roster spots is a waste of a much-needed bench spot for an additional utility infielder or extra outfielder. As we saw this year, the Yanks needed all the utility players they could get their hands on.

    2. Garcia
      September 4th, 2010 | 10:39 am

      Yeah that’s too many catchers. Your line of thinking may be in the right place, but I think it’s too idealistic, this would only work in a video game setting.

    3. September 4th, 2010 | 10:53 am

      You don’t think Montero would just take the place of Thames, who the Yankees had on their roster all year, and, give you the option of a third catcher, and a PH for Cervelli when Posada is the DH, and then that’s more valuable than having Thames who basically is a DH against LHP and a liability in the OF?

    4. jay
      September 4th, 2010 | 10:57 am

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      You don’t think Montero would just take the place of Thames, who the Yankees had on their roster all year, and, give you the option of a third catcher, and a PH for Cervelli when Posada is the DH, and then that’s more valuable than having Thames who basically is a DH against LHP and a liability in the OF?

      I think what the other guys are saying is that you have to compare the roster composition you’re suggesting (Posada, Montero, Cervelli) to an alternate use of the same 3 positions (Posada, Montero, _______). I think if it means Montero’s success as a future MLB catcher is increased because it breaks him in a little more easily then it might be a good idea, but it’d be hard justifying a roster spot for Cervelli over a 25th man pinch hitter type (like a Thames, Jermaine Dye, etc.. some other scrap heap dude.)

      There’s also the matter of what will *likely* happen, and I could see something like this happen if the other roster spots are producing. This year, for example, it would be tough to pull off because Girardi needed the extra IFs (Pena, Nunez) with Jeter struggling and ARod on the non-official DL for more than a handful of games.

    5. 77yankees
      September 4th, 2010 | 10:58 am

      Actually carrying three catchers was more of a luxury 15-20 years ago where teams didn’t feel compelled to carry 12 or 13 pitchers. In 2011, I don’t know if that’s possible, unless once of them is a super sub who can play multiple positions in a pinch in addition to being a backup catcher.

    6. Corey Italiano
      September 4th, 2010 | 11:04 am

      It was a little later in the year than I expected but…

      http://waswatching.com/2009/09/13/jeter-before-21/#comment-231647

    7. YankCrank
      September 4th, 2010 | 11:04 am

      That would easily be the worst trio of defensive catchers in the history of baseball :)

    8. September 4th, 2010 | 11:22 am

      YankCrank wrote:

      That would easily be the worst trio of defensive catchers in the history of baseball

      That’s an excellent point.

      But, on the flip side, there are some in the game who think bat first, arm later, on catchers – because, in the Moneyball era, teams play station to station baseball and don’t run as much anymore.

      Of course, if the new Moneyball model is defense and stealing, which it may be, then this trio would be an issue.

    9. Corey Italiano
      September 4th, 2010 | 11:30 am

      I think the Yankees missed their chance to trade Cervelli at his peak value at the trade deadline, with multiple teams rumored to have inquired about him.

      I personally think Jesus should be up here, now. At the least sit on the bench in street clothes and hang.

    10. YankCrank
      September 4th, 2010 | 12:02 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      Of course, if the new Moneyball model is defense and stealing, which it may be, then this trio would be an issue.

      There’s a lot of speed in the division, but then again, having Cervelli and Posada stink it up behind the plate this year hasn’t exactly killed our season. This team has so many weapons, they’ve proven they don’t need a Johnny Bench back there for the team to succeed.

      Corey Italiano wrote:

      I personally think Jesus should be up here, now. At the least sit on the bench in street clothes and hang.

      I’ll respectfully disagree. The kid is crushing the ball, and it wouldn’t hurt for him to play some meaningful playoff games at AAA. He’ll be in the Bronx when the minor league season is wrapped up, probably in street clothes and not in the dugout, but he’ll be hanging out with the team and taking bp with them.

    11. Jeteupthemiddle Allie
      September 4th, 2010 | 12:52 pm

      Corey Italiano wrote:

      I think the Yankees missed their chance to trade Cervelli at his peak value at the trade deadline, with multiple teams rumored to have inquired about him.
      I personally think Jesus should be up here, now. At the least sit on the bench in street clothes and hang.

      Well I would agree about trading Cervelli if there was someone in the AAA who they could readily promote with potential to improve. I know Chad Moeller was there, but there isn’t much potential there…at least with Cervelli there is the possibility of more.

      Unless, your thought was to promote Montero once Cervelli was traded?

      I do think Montero should get a September call up, but I also agree with YankCrank in that I like him playing in some meaningful games…even if they are minor league meaningful. I think he’ll get in a game or two once the minor league season wraps though.

    12. 77yankees
      September 4th, 2010 | 4:08 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      Of course, if the new Moneyball model is defense and stealing, which it may be, then this trio would be an issue.

      LOL, as was pointed out the other day, the “Moneyball” people are the same ones who traded away Carlos Gonzalez, Andre Ethier, and Nelson Cruz for Milton Bradley, three months of Matt Holliday, and a couple of minor leaguers.

    13. MJ Recanati
      September 5th, 2010 | 7:52 am

      77yankees wrote:

      LOL, as was pointed out the other day, the “Moneyball” people are the same ones who traded away Carlos Gonzalez, Andre Ethier, and Nelson Cruz for Milton Bradley, three months of Matt Holliday, and a couple of minor leaguers.

      Which does a good job of proving that NO GM is infallible, that they all make mistakes and that decisions which appear sound at the time (or were dictated by circumstance) look worse with hindsight.

      Cashman has a very good track record, people around here know that, yet somehow he’s perceived by a select group as somehow inferior to the bulk of the league’s GM’s.

    14. MJ Recanati
      September 5th, 2010 | 7:52 am

      Corey Italiano wrote:

      It was a little later in the year than I expected but…
      http://waswatching.com/2009/09/13/jeter-before-21/#comment-231647

      LOL, so true!

    15. 77yankees
      September 5th, 2010 | 9:40 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Which does a good job of proving that NO GM is infallible, that they all make mistakes and that decisions which appear sound at the time (or were dictated by circumstance) look worse with hindsight.

      I’m not going to recycle the Cashman arguments here – we have the pro and anti-Cashman brigades here and no amount of debate will change that.

      But what you said is certainly true – you can go through the track records of every team and find the good and bad moves. The Twins GM who let go of David Ortiz for nothing in 2002 is the same one who traded AJ Pierzynski for Francisco Liriano & Joe Nathan less than a year later.

    16. Raf
      September 5th, 2010 | 10:54 am

      77yankees wrote:

      The Twins GM who let go of David Ortiz for nothing in 2002

      That move made sense at the time too; Ortiz was going to get a major raise in arbitration and at that point hadn’t shown that he was going to be worth it. He had loads of potential, but nothing to show for it up to that point.

    Leave a reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.