• No Shock, Just Questions, In Yankeeland The Morning After

    Posted by on October 23rd, 2010 · Comments (55)

    In their last 67 games of the 2010 regular season, the Yankees went 34-33. During this time, their pitchers allowed 4.5 runs per game and their offense scored 5.1 runs per game. Clearly, for the last 67 games of the season – which is more than 40% of the schedule – the Yankees were in tread water mode.

    And, it was worse towards the end. In their last 26 games of the 2010 regular season, the Yankees went 9-17. During this time, their pitchers allowed 5.4 runs per game and their offense scored 4.6 runs per game.

    So, should be be shocked that the Yankees averaged 4.0 runs scored per game and allowed 5.0 runs per game this post-season? What the Yankees did, collectively, in the ALDS and ALCS was basically the same poor performance that they had over their last 26 games of the season.

    Personally, I was concerned about their poor closing performance as they headed into the ALDS. Therefore, I’m not shocked that they Yankees went 5-4 in their 9 post-season games. Mediocre is as mediocre does, and all that.

    More so, at this point, I’m more interested in the “why?” than the “what.” Why did the Yankees play so poorly for so long at the close of the season? And, who was responsible for realizing what was going on and what did they do to address it? There’s failure here. And, there has to be a root cause. Further, what will be done to address it for next season? And, who’s on point for that?

    I have some preliminary ideas about all this – but, at this junction, I’d rather here from you. What do you think about this? How would you answer these questions?

    Comments on No Shock, Just Questions, In Yankeeland The Morning After

    1. Evan3457
      October 24th, 2010 | 5:04 pm

      His opposition OPS in the post-season was .974, because they hit 3 doubles, a triple and a home run off him in his 6 innings over 10 appearances.

    2. MJ Recanati
      October 25th, 2010 | 2:02 pm

      Joseph Maloney wrote:

      Joba could have won ten games in the starting rotation this year. My feeling coming out of spring training was Javy would finish with between 10-9 and 12-10. I can’t understand what folk were looking at to think this guy was any better than that. Basically his whole career is aabout being a .500 pitcher. And on top of that, as I stated earlier, he is a horrible postseason pitcher. Joba pitched pretty well last postseason.

      What you wrote makes no sense. If you saw Vazquez as a .500 starter with between 10-12 wins but thought Chamberlain could win 10 games, where exactly was the upgrade to the Yankees (ignoring, of course, that wins by starting pitchers is a putrid yardstick).

    3. October 25th, 2010 | 11:27 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:

      With Chamberlain there is hope that maybe he can be more someday, with Vazquez there is no hope. Chamberlain pitched decently in last year’s postseason (he certainly pitched better than Hughes last year), Vazquez has never pitched well in the postseason.

    4. MJ Recanati
      October 26th, 2010 | 8:54 am

      Joseph Maloney wrote:

      Chamberlain pitched decently in last year’s postseason (he certainly pitched better than Hughes last year),

      Evan already addressed this just four comments above your own. Chamberlain, in fact, did not pitch well in last year’s playoffs.

      Chamberlain, 2009 playoffs: 6.1 IP, 9 H, 1 BB, 5 XBH, .333/.345/.600 batting line against.

      The sample size is obviously tiny but it speaks directly to the point that your perception is off about Chamberlain. He was ineffective in the 2009 playoffs. It may have seemed like he had a good post season because that was a drastic improvement over the shit he’d been slinging over the final six weeks of the season but the numbers don’t paint a picture of effectiveness in the ’09 playoffs.

      I’m not sure your reference to Hughes is about the regular season or the post-season so I can’t address it.

    5. McMillan
      October 25th, 2013 | 7:58 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      The Yankees didn’t hit in the [2010] ALCS and the main culprits were Mark Teixeira, Alex Rodriguez, Jorge Posada, Nick Swisher and Brett Gardner. What could Brian Cashman have done in the winter of 2009 to mitigate this?

      The Yankees didn’t hit in the 2012 ALCS, and the main culprits were Mark Teixeira, Alex Rodriguez, Russell Martin, Nick Swisher, and Curtis Granderson. What could Brian Cashman have done in the winters of 2010 and 2011 to mitigate this? Build teams with better starting pitching depth and a more balanced postseason lineup, as Cherington has done in Boston.

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