• Rick Kranitz The New Yankees Pitching Coach?

    Posted by on October 26th, 2010 · Comments (10)

    That’s one theory.

    Comments on Rick Kranitz The New Yankees Pitching Coach?

    1. Corey Italiano
      October 27th, 2010 | 12:16 am

      My vote would go to David Cone

    2. MJ Recanati
      October 27th, 2010 | 8:44 am

      @ Corey Italiano:
      I’m anti-legacy/celebrity coaching. If you haven’t earned the job by working for it, you shouldn’t just get it because you were a popular ex-jock. Guidry was “scheisse” and that should be the end of the story.

      My vote goes to begging Don Cooper of the White Sox to ditch his jerkoff bosses and come back home to New York.

    3. #15
      October 27th, 2010 | 12:37 pm

      I always thought Cone would be good at it and I love his fire and energy level. I really think the guy knew how to get it done when he had great stuff, and how to hold it together when he didn’t. That said, IMO he’d have had to have done some time in the minors, or working with pitchers in rehab, or been deeply involved spring training stints, or worked with guys struggling with control, etc… to be a serious contender.

    4. October 27th, 2010 | 12:47 pm

      I wonder if the Yankees will try and get Jimmy Key off the golf course and see if he has an interest?

    5. MJ Recanati
      October 27th, 2010 | 1:49 pm

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      As with Cone, I don’t see why the Yankees should just promote a guy right out of retirement. There’s something to be said for experience in the job and a much better grasp of the institutional knowledge of the people you’ll be in charge of.

    6. Corey Italiano
      October 27th, 2010 | 5:25 pm

      He greatly, greatly impressed me when he was doing the broadcasts. He knows what he’s doing in there.

    7. October 27th, 2010 | 5:39 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      There’s something to be said for experience in the job and a much better grasp of the institutional knowledge of the people you’ll be in charge of.

      I dunno – that’s sort of why we keep ending up with retread managers in baseball. Sometimes you need to bring in someone new to the mix. And, often, IMHO, a guy who was excellent for the job in the past was not available because of wanting to be with his family or something. And, later, things change for him.

    8. redbug
      October 27th, 2010 | 6:08 pm

      @ Steve Lombardi:

      I agree w/o knowing who’d that be.

      David Cone was my of my favorite Yankees because as #15 said, “new how to get it done when he had great stuff, and how to hold it together when he didn’t”. The problem w/ Cone is it was reported that he and the Yankees had a major falling-out when his broadcating contract was up. If true, he’s out of the mix as pitching coach. Plus, he doesn’t need the money or the hassle.

      Any recent great, retired pitcher is probably out of the mix because they don’t need the money or the hassle. Plus, even the supposed great coaches can only work w/ what they have. (See Leo Mazzone brought to Baltimore from Atlanta.) Who is going to be able to fix AJ? Seriously.

    9. 77yankees
      October 27th, 2010 | 11:24 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      I’m anti-legacy/celebrity coaching. If you haven’t earned the job by working for it, you shouldn’t just get it because you were a popular ex-jock.

      A lot of the better hitting/pitching coaches over the years were guys who had no or little ML success because with superstars, it comes naturally with talent in most instances, and they probably take things for granted that a neophyte or a lesser talented player wouldn’t know.

    10. MJ Recanati
      October 28th, 2010 | 7:38 am

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      I’m not advocating for retreads. I’m just saying that there’s something to be said for having done the job you’re being asked to do once before, even at the minor league level.

      Not all first-time coaches are bad hires but not all veterans are just retreads either. Cone (or Key) might be able to do a good job. But my preference is to reward someone that has been working at his craft. I’m sure there’s a minor league pitching coach out there somewhere in the universe that is great at his job and deserves the shot more than two popular ex-Yankees that have no coaching experience.

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