• Cashman: Yanks Offer To Jeter Is “Appropriate & Fair”

    Posted by on November 23rd, 2010 · Comments (14)

    Via George King

    According to the Yankees, there hasn’t been anything confusing about contract negotiations with Derek Jeter.

    Agent Casey Close described the Yankees’ negotiating strategy on Sunday as “baffling” and accused the Yankees of using the press and not acknowledging Jeter’s contributions to the club.

    Yesterday, general manager Brian Cashman strongly denied the organization has acted that way with its shortstop, captain and all-time hits leader.

    “There is nothing baffling about our position,” Cashman said. “We have been very honest and direct with them, not through the press. We feel our offer is appropriate and fair. We appreciate the contributions Derek has made to our organization and we have made it clear to them. Our primary focus is his on-the-field performance the last couple of years in conjunction with his age, and we have some concerns in that area that need to be addressed in a multiyear deal going forward.

    “I restate Derek Jeter is the best shortstop for this franchise as we move forward. The difficulty is finding out what is fair between both sides.”

    Cashman said the Yankees won’t offer Jeter arbitration by tonight’s deadline.

    When Jeter became a free agent five days after the World Series, the two most delicious points were: Jeter’s value to the Yankees was greater than any other team, and the Yankees had no legitimate replacement and would be smothered under an avalanche of angry backlash if Jeter left.

    Nothing has changed. Early in the process, owner Hal Steinbrenner admitted there was a chance negotiations could get “messy,” and the words the past few days have proven that.

    Working in the Yankees’ favor is Jeter’s value on the open market is in the $7 million-to-$10 million range, that his career-low .270 batting average last year raises questions, and doubts over how much longer can he play shortstop.

    In Jeter’s favor is his .334 batting average in 2009, and his stature as a career .314 hitter.

    Also in the Yankees’ favor is the average annual value of other middle infielders. At $15 million per, Jeter would be on top.

    Man, this is getting acrimonious. Do the Yankees realize that, even if they get Jeter to take three years at $45 million, he’s not going to get over this bad blood any time soon? The dude is extremely full of pride. Maybe it’s time for Jeter and his agent to start working the Orioles and/or Rays on a one-year pillow contract and then the Yankees can watch Jeter get his 3,000th career hit in some other uniform?

    Comments on Cashman: Yanks Offer To Jeter Is “Appropriate & Fair”

    1. November 23rd, 2010 | 11:03 am

      “Man, this is getting acrimonious. Do the Yankees realize that, even if they get Jeter to take three years at $45 million, he’s not going to get over this bad blood any time soon? The dude is extremely full of pride.”

      You know what? If Jeter can’t get over the insult of being paid only 2-3 times what his numbers are worth, it kind of proves that he’s all about himself, and not about the team. You know, the way people say A-Rod is.

      If he’s going to pull a Torre and take less money elsewhere to prove his point, I say let him.

    2. Scout
      November 23rd, 2010 | 11:11 am

      @ lisaswan:
      Amen. And if Jeter’s people think there is going to be a groundswell of support for him, they are very much mistaken.

    3. MJ Recanati
      November 23rd, 2010 | 11:23 am

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      Man, this is getting acrimonious. Do the Yankees realize that, even if they get Jeter to take three years at $45 million, he’s not going to get over this bad blood any time soon? The dude is extremely full of pride. Maybe it’s time for Jeter and his agent to start working the Orioles and/or Rays on a one-year pillow contract and then the Yankees can watch Jeter get his 3,000th career hit in some other uniform?

      First, if Jeter takes the contract offer but doesn’t get over the bad blood, what difference would it make? Once he signs the contract, any bad blood is irrelevant. What, he’s going to dog it on the field to get back at the Yanks? That won’t happen. He’ll either take the contract or let bad blood get in the way. Not both.

      Second, I have a hard time seeing the Rays moving Jason Bartlett off shortstop to clear space for Derek Jeter on a one-year basis. Why would the Rays hurt their team defense like that? What would it get them? It’s not like Jeter’s going to agree to play in Tampa for one year as a DH, LF, 1B or 2B so Tampa’s just not a very realistic destination.

      As many have said before, if Jeter doesn’t want to be the highest-paid shortstop in all of baseball in New York, that’s his prerogative. The taem will survive without him and the fans that support Jeter above all else will learn to live without Jeter too. And if Jeter wants to take less money to play elsewhere, then he’s welcome to cut off his nose to spite his face. It won’t be better for him to do so but that’s really neither here nor there.

      Bottom line, no matter how acrimonious this gets, Jeter will end up staying in New York and signing on to remain the game’s highest-paid shortstop. He may not like how things are going right now but he’ll get over the hurt feelings soon enough. And if he doesn’t, well…he doesn’t. He’s a big boy and should’ve thought of this when he went out there hacking at every first pitch he saw in 2010.

    4. MJ Recanati
      November 23rd, 2010 | 11:28 am

      I should add that I’m very surprised the Yankees aren’t offering Jeter arbitration. He’d be guaranteed a pay-raise and a one year deal which would buy the team time to decide where to go with the shortstop position in the future. If 2010 really was a harbinger of Jeter’s decline then wouldn’t the Yanks want the flexibility to walk away from Jeter after 2011?

      If Jeter rejected arbitration then the team could collect two draft picks if/when he signed elsewhere. I see it as a win-win.

    5. Raf
      November 23rd, 2010 | 1:07 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      I should add that I’m very surprised the Yankees aren’t offering Jeter arbitration.

      As am I, but this seems to be their way of doing things. I don’t particularly agree with it, but it is what it is.

    6. #15
      November 23rd, 2010 | 1:27 pm

      I would definitely offer arbitration. They can still agree to a deal, but Jeter gets paid for 2011 and the Yankees avoid an imprudent long term contract. Now if Jete lights it up in 2011, time to pay up for the Yankees. if he gives us more of the same (as he did in the back half of 2010, he doesn’t get, nor deserve a last big pay day.

      Here’s one possibility for Jeter’s attitude.. pure speculation, but not that farfetched of an idea… Maybe he played hurt a good part of last year. Nothing that required surgery and nothing that was career threatening, aka…. a rib cage strain, a forearm issue, and/or an upper back muscle issue etc…. the team knew it but had no better options while A-Rod was injured, etc… In short, he toughed it out. Now the Yankees are saying…. “You’re stats show you are slipping” and Jeter is thinking… “Wait a minute, I toughed it out for the team when I needed a break and you’re going to ding me for it for the next few years?”

      That being, or not being, the case arbitration kicks the can down the road and gives clarity to how Jeter ought to be paid for the next few years after 2011.

      I hope everyone backs off and keeps this out of the press.

    7. MJ Recanati
      November 23rd, 2010 | 1:44 pm

      Raf wrote:

      this seems to be their way of doing things

      Indeed. In some cases (Bobby Abreu), it’s worked well for them. In others (Johnny Damon), I’m not so sure that their blind adherence to this method was the best way to go.

    8. Jim TreshFan
      November 23rd, 2010 | 2:47 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:
      …if Jeter doesn’t want to be the highest-paid shortstop in all of baseball…
      ________________

      You know, I really don’t think this is about being the highest paid shortstop. It’s about being the highest paid Yankee. I really believe Jeter thinks he deserves that distinction.

    9. November 23rd, 2010 | 3:13 pm

      @ Jim TreshFan:
      I think you’re right. And if that’s the case, then the two parties will never come to terms (A-Rod’s owed, what, another $200 million or so over the next seven years?)

    10. MJ Recanati
      November 23rd, 2010 | 3:51 pm

      Jim TreshFan wrote:

      You know, I really don’t think this is about being the highest paid shortstop. It’s about being the highest paid Yankee. I really believe Jeter thinks he deserves that distinction.

      You really might be right. And if that’s the case, well…it’ll be an eye-opening experience for Captain Intangibles.

      Once again, all I can tell Jeter is that he should’ve thought of all this when he was out there hacking at the first pitch in every AB and grounding out weakly. Next time he’ll be more judicious about when he turns in a dog-crap season.

    11. November 23rd, 2010 | 4:28 pm

      @ MJ Recanati: That Keith Olbermann column Steve posted the other day, about Jeter’s hitting approach last year, seemed to show that the Yanks weren’t happy about his at-bats, either.

    12. MJ Recanati
      November 23rd, 2010 | 5:47 pm

      @ lisaswan:
      Yep, and I can’t say I blame them. His approach at the plate was terrible in 2010.

    13. redbug
      November 23rd, 2010 | 5:52 pm

      “There is nothing baffling about our position,” Cashman said. “We have been very honest and direct with them, not through the press. We feel our offer is appropriate and fair. We appreciate the contributions Derek has made to our organization and we have made it clear to them. Our primary focus is his on-the-field performance the last couple of years in conjunction with his age, and we have some concerns in that area that need to be addressed in a multiyear deal going forward.”

      Right. Not through the press. Let’s see, we know what’s been offered; we know it’s his “on-the-field performance the last couple of years” and we know it’s his age.

      Otherwise, it’s nothing in the press.

    14. RobertGKramer@AOL.Com
      November 23rd, 2010 | 8:28 pm

      I consider the Damon negotiations last year as the first step in the Jeter negotiations this year! And I can see the $ rising somewhat, but not the years!

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