• Jeter “Angry” Contract Talks Went Public, Looking Past It Now

    Posted by on December 7th, 2010 · Comments (14)

    Derek Jeter at his press conference today:

    “The thing that probably bothered me the most was how public this became…It was not an enjoyable experience…I’d be lying to you if I said I wasn’t angry about how some of this went. [But], I’m not going to point the finger at anyone. As you can see now, we’re one big happy family.”

    How “P.C.” of Derek…but, did you expect anything else? Maybe, someday, we’ll hear who ticked him off, the most, during this whole thing?

    Comments on Jeter “Angry” Contract Talks Went Public, Looking Past It Now

    1. Raf
      December 7th, 2010 | 3:30 pm

      Hopefully, some this anger will translate into more line drives? No one’s going to care if he’s butthurt about negotiations, if he has another season like the last one…

    2. Jim TreshFan
      December 7th, 2010 | 3:32 pm

      I watched it at home. Thank God I had enough bread and peanut butter ’cause they sure were spooning out the fluff. Did anyone else catch Sweeny Murti’s question about Jeter’s “future?” Somehow Murti managed to get the “P” word (i.e. “Position”) in there. I gave Jeter an 8 for the way he danced around it—Bruno would probably have rated him higher maybe. In any event it’s going to be the new word with Jeter now.

    3. December 7th, 2010 | 4:31 pm

      Via Bob Klap – Derek Jeter says he was “angry” that his negotiation went public, particularly unhappy with Brian Cashman. “I made my feelings known.”

    4. MCNY
      December 7th, 2010 | 4:37 pm

      I watched it as well. Like Jeter, I guess I’m just disappointed in how this turned out. You’d think with five rings they’d at least keep the negotiations in-house. I don’t think that was too much to ask.

    5. redbug
      December 7th, 2010 | 6:04 pm

      @ MCNY:

      I couldn’t agree more. Derek Jeter might be saying it’s over now but I doubt the bad feelings are really gone for him. They certainly are not for me.

    6. Evan3457
      December 7th, 2010 | 7:12 pm

      Don’t really care about his feelings.

      If he wants to hold a grudge, then Mariano will be the last one introduced at Old Timers’ Day, 2030.

    7. MJ Recanati
      December 7th, 2010 | 7:58 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Don’t really care about his feelings.
      If he wants to hold a grudge, then Mariano will be the last one introduced at Old Timers’ Day, 2030.

      Agree completely. Jeter needs to get over it.

    8. December 7th, 2010 | 11:07 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:
      What a baby. The less somebody is criticized, the more they lash out when they do get even mild criticism.

    9. G.I. Joey
      December 8th, 2010 | 10:00 am

      Jeter may be a veteran baseball player, but he is a neophyte when it comes to negotiating a business deal.

      Joel Sherman wrote:

      “Jeter has been a genius at controlling the message, crafting his reputation the way he desires mainly through the discipline to keep his inner circle small and his comments uncontroversial.

      That is why Jeter was so annoyed at these contract extension negotiations with the Yankees — because the team refused to follow his script.

      For example, Jeter wanted to concede at the outset that he had no leverage by telling the Yankees he would not even consider other teams. And then — in Jeter World — the Yankees were supposed to act like Jeter had leverage nevertheless. Jeter felt like the negotiations should remain quiet simply because he wanted them that way.

      On a few occasions yesterday, Jeter lectured that this was a normal negotiation. But in his universe, “normal” negotiations means they go as he wants. In reality, a normal negotiation has both sides using just about any means possible to get a favorable result. And for the Yankees that meant using their leverage and their bully pulpit.”

    10. December 8th, 2010 | 10:12 am

      More on this via
      http://www.espn1040.com/includes/blog/index.php?action=blog&blog_id=8&post_id=1143

      “I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t angry how some of this went,” Jeter said at the news conference to announce his three-year, $51 million deal that includes a player option for a fourth year on Tuesday at the team’s spring training complex.

      Jeter did not like that the negotiations went public as the Yankees and Jeter’s agent, Casey Close, went back-and-forth in the press. Jeter even distanced himself from Close’s comments in which he described the negotiations as “baffling.”

      “I’m going to be honest with you guys, the thing that bothered me the most was how public this became,” said Jeter, who thought there was a perception he was being greedy and demanding. “This was a negotiation that was supposed to be private. It was an uncomfortable position I felt I was in. It was not enjoyable experience because throughout the years I’ve prided myself on keeping things out of the papers and out of the media. This turned into a big public thing. That is something I was not happy about. I let my feelings be known.”

      On three occasions during the negotiations, Jeter met with Yankees owner Hal Steinbrenner and Yankees general manager Brian Cashman. While the Yankees and Jeter have agreed to reconcile, Cashman had no regrets about speaking publicly about Jeter.

      “I was angry I was put in the position to have to respond,” said Cashman, referring to Close’s comments. “Anger met anger. You get past it and you move forward.”

      The shortstop and the club reached a preliminary agreement Saturday on the deal, which also includes an $8 million player option for 2014. Jeter was coming off a $189 million, 10-year contract. He was initially offered a $45 million, three-year deal. Jeter reportedly asked for a five- or six-year year deal for $22-24 million per season.

      He said he told the team he would not test free agency. But with such a discrepancy between the two sides, the Yankees felt Jeter should find out his true market value. It is unlikely Jeter could have gotten anything close to the contract he received from the Yankees on the open market.

      “I was angry about it because I was the one who said, ‘I didn’t want to do it,’” said Jeter, who added he is now happy with the deal he signed. “I was the one who said, ‘I wasn’t going to do it.’ To hear the organization tell me to go shop it, when I just told you I wasn’t going to, yeah, if I’m going to be honest, I was angry about it.”

    11. MJ Recanati
      December 8th, 2010 | 10:50 am

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      the deal, which also includes an $8 million player option for 2014.

      That is, by far, the worst part of this deal. Even at $8M, the Yankees never should’ve given Jeter control of his future with the club. If Jeter wanted a fourth year, the Yankees should’ve insisted on a team option with a punitive buyout. That way, Jeter could get his money and the Yanks could walk away from what will surely be a close to replacement-level player by then.

      Yuck. The Yanks had all the leverage and yet still caved in on some fundamental issues.

    12. December 8th, 2010 | 11:14 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      The Yanks had all the leverage and yet still caved in on some fundamental issues.

      Why is it when moves work out, it’s “Cashman,” and when a “bad call” is made it’s “The Yanks”? ;-)

    13. MJ Recanati
      December 8th, 2010 | 11:26 am

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      They are one and the same. If you want me to re-write that sentence, I’m happy to.

      Brian Cashman, negotiating as the GM of the Yanks, had all the leverage and yet still caved in on some fundamental issues. Cashman did a poor job representing the Yankees’ best interests in the negotiation of a contract with an aging player coming off his worst season in the face of absolutely no competition from other teams and at a time when the low end of the market was set at $7M/season for similarly-aged players of similar skill.

      3Y/$45M was a generous offer and should’ve been the final deal. Frankly, had Cashman opened at 3Y/$30M and advanced up to 3Y/$45M, that would’ve been fine too.

    14. Evan3457
      December 8th, 2010 | 12:06 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      MJ Recanati wrote:The Yanks had all the leverage and yet still caved in on some fundamental issues.Why is it when moves work out, it’s “Cashman,” and when a “bad call” is made it’s “The Yanks”?

      Maybe because in the case of the Jeter negotiations, it’s such a big issue to the organization, that Cashman is acting under instructions and limits of upper-upper-upper management.

      Therefore, every concession probably had to run through Hank and Hal.

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