• How Will Cashman Handle His Contract Talks In 2011?

    Posted by on December 18th, 2010 · Comments (11)

    First, let’s flashback to the news of September 30, 2008, vis Bryan Hoch -

    Brian Cashman finalized a contract extension on Tuesday to remain as the general manager of the Yankees, an agreement that will run through the 2011 season.

    Cashman, 41, has served as the club’s GM since February 1998, and his future in the role had been in some doubt as the Yankees finished their 89-73 season, missing the playoffs for the first time since the strike-shortened 1994 campaign.

    Yankees co-chairmen Hal and Hank Steinbrenner had both publicly pledged support for Cashman’s return in 2009, but Cashman had refused to negotiate a contract for himself during the season.

    The Yankees completed their campaign on Sunday by splitting a day-night doubleheader at Fenway Park, and during that series Cashman told reporters that he would not permit his contract situation to drag out, saying to expect an announcement “sooner rather than later.”

    So, what happens this season? Will Cashman again refuse to negotiate a contract for himself during the season? Or, will he pressure the Brothers Steinbrenner to get it done before his current deal expires? And, if he does, what will be their reaction?

    Related, will this be the year that Cashman finally gets promoted? (This is something that I would like to see.)

    And, of course, if Cashman is not the Yankees GM in 2012 – albeit because he was not retained or promoted – who will be the next GM of the Yankees

    Lastly, what’s next for Cashman if he leaves the Yankees?  (My money is on “ESPN Talking Head” – à la Steve Phillips.)

    What are you thoughts on Cashman and his contract situation? If you were the Yankees, how would you handle it?

    Comments on How Will Cashman Handle His Contract Talks In 2011?

    1. Ryan81
      December 18th, 2010 | 10:25 pm

      The Yankees lowball him based on back-to-back career low performances in the last offseason and this offseason, where the team has gotten worse each year. But they give him more than his market worth because he means more to the Yankees prestige and brand name than other GMs would. He then complains to Mike Lupica about the contract offer and that the Steinbrenners’ negotiating strategy is “baffling”.

    2. Raf
      December 19th, 2010 | 7:43 am

      I don’t think he’ll pressure the Bros. Stein, he doesn’t have a reason to do so. I figure the contract situation will go as smoothly as it did last time. Given the nature of the organization, I would think that Cashman has the GM job as long as he wants it.

    3. December 19th, 2010 | 9:44 am

      Ryan81 wrote:

      The Yankees lowball him based on back-to-back career low performances in the last offseason and this offseason, where the team has gotten worse each year. But they give him more than his market worth because he means more to the Yankees prestige and brand name than other GMs would. He then complains to Mike Lupica about the contract offer and that the Steinbrenners’ negotiating strategy is “baffling”.

      Dude. Either you need to start making more comments, or, we need to get you a blog. This is seriously funny. And, I’m jealous that I didn’t think of it!

    4. December 19th, 2010 | 9:48 am

      Raf wrote:

      I would think that Cashman has the GM job as long as he wants it.

      You may be correct because Hal Stein is a mental midget and Randy/Lonn are white-collar BS artists who probably like the company of another in Cashman. If Cashman does get the axe it will probably be the result of Hank and/or Felix Lopez getting more a voice in the matter. Will that happen? Dunno? But, we are hearing more from Hank lately…

    5. MJ Recanati
      December 19th, 2010 | 9:55 am

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      Hal Stein is a mental midget

      Why is Hal a “mental midget” in your opinion? I’d say he’s running the Yankees in a far more sensible way than his father or older brother ever did.

    6. December 19th, 2010 | 10:11 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Why is Hal a “mental midget” in your opinion? I’d say he’s running the Yankees in a far more sensible way than his father or older brother ever did.

      Hal’s sister, Trost, and Levine are running the show. Hal is just a face for the media. Did you see his interview in “House of Steinbrenner”? He’s a buffoon that’s been programed by years of military school. “Ah, checklists. Checklists are good. I like checklists. I do well with checklists.” He sounded like the Stein character on Seinfeld. Seriously, listen to his interviews. Ever hear him answer a question with “No”? Nope. It’s always “Negative” (instead of ‘no’). Again, someone who wants to pretend like he’s some tough General task-master when really his just a twerp who was sent away to military school rather than be raised by his parents.

      Hey, maybe he is just like his dad in some ways?

    7. MJ Recanati
      December 19th, 2010 | 10:18 am

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      I actually haven’t heard any of that. I guess each person hears what they want to hear. You think he’s a “twerp” so that’s what you hear. I think he’s a reserved character that doesn’t feel comfortable in front of TV cameras like his father and brother.

      Anyway, it hardly matters. Whoever is running the show at the top of the organization is doing a good job. The Yankees are profitable, successful and far less dysfunction than they were when the old man was alive.

    8. Ryan81
      December 19th, 2010 | 11:53 am

      I’m flattered by the compliment Steve.

      As for Hal, I don’t think he’s “stupid.” And the Yankees can do far worse than the Steinbrenner kids when it comes to owners; I mean could you imagine Jimmy Dolan, the Wilpons, Donald Sterling, or Charles Wang trying to run this team? That being said, I think his weakness is probably the fact that his highest ranking officials come off as conniving (Levine), devoid of public relations skill (Trost), and IMO straight-up incompetent (Cashman). I also feel that Hal has somewhat of the heart that George has which is why he won’t get rid of any of them, as they are his closest friends in the organization. Take Cashman for example: he was pretty guilty for building a 2008 team that totally bombed in a 162 game season (which you can’t really blame on small sample size or a bad week in October) and were embarrassed by a Tampa franchise that spends 5 times less money than the Yankees. And he still kept his job. However, Hal’s not sentimental in the fact that he’ll break his back for the ballplayers as it’s pretty clear he wants no part of that arena. And as fans go, that might hurt his image in the long run. I mean, how many people show up to games wearing Cashman t-shirts instead of Jeter t-shirts?

    9. Raf
      December 19th, 2010 | 12:15 pm

      Ryan81 wrote:

      Take Cashman for example: he was pretty guilty for building a 2008 team that totally bombed in a 162 game season (which you can’t really blame on small sample size or a bad week in October) and were embarrassed by a Tampa franchise that spends 5 times less money than the Yankees. And he still kept his job.

      Injuries were the problem with the Yanks in 2008. Not sure how the Yanks were “embarrassed” by the Rays; they were in the playoffs from 1995-2007, then again in 2009-10. The Rays wish they had a streak like that.

    10. Ryan81
      December 19th, 2010 | 1:10 pm

      The bottom line is that the Yankees had their worst season under Cashman right as his contract was up. Quite frankly, the Yankees had plenty more reasons to let him go than to keep him. Sure there were a lot of other problems in 2008, but I think when push comes to shove, that situation shows you how much this ownership likes the current front office.

    11. Raf
      December 19th, 2010 | 4:24 pm

      @ Ryan81:
      Worst season or no, the 2008 Yankees won 2 games more than the 2000 world championship team. If anything when he re-signed I would think management looked at his body of work up to that point. There certainly hasn’t been the short-sightedness that plagued the organization during the 80′s.

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