• Cashman: What, Me Worry? I Have Until July!

    Posted by on December 20th, 2010 · Comments (100)

    Via Wally Matthews

    Having finished second, or maybe third, in the Cliff Lee sweepstakes, the Yankees are prepared to go into the 2011 season with a pitching rotation of CC Sabathia, A.J. Burnett and Phil Hughes , with the remaining spots filled out by youngsters, many of whom have never pitched above the Triple-A level.

    “I’m not saying I want to do it,” general manager Brian Cashman said in a telephone conversation Monday morning, “but I may have to do it.”

    Cashman is operating under the assumption that Andy Pettitte, back home in Deer, Park, Texas, following a an excellent season cut short by a groin injury, will not be returning for a 17th major league season.

    “If we get Pettitte back, so much the better,” Cashman said. “But I’m not waiting for him. He told me not to.”

    Cashman acknowledged his team could use a major league ready starter as well as another arm in the bullpen but seemed pessimistic about the chances of getting one before Opening Day.

    “Could I go out and get a starter? Yes, I could. But there’s just not much out there,” Cashman said. “I have March, April, May, June and July, really, to come up with someone.”

    Cashman also ruled out, although not absolutely, the possibility the Yankees might include catching prospect Jesus Montero in a trade for a front-line starter now that the Yankees have signed Russell Martin to assume every-day catching duties. “There’s just nobody out there I would consider trading Montero for,” Cashman said.

    “We have 10 prospects starting from Double-A on up that our organization can choose from,” Cashman said.

    The GM ruled out a return to the rotation for Joba Chamberlain, who along with David Robertson will compete for the job as eighth-inning set-up man vacated when Kerry Wood became a free agent.

    “In the past, we might have gone out and traded away prospects just to get someone in here,” Cashman said. “But realistically, I have until July to get this solved.”

    Just wonderful. So, it’s going to be “2008” again in Yankeeland – in 2011. Remember then? That’s when Cashman went with kids like Hughes and Kennedy in the rotation to start the season. And, they were later replaced with Darrell Rasner and Sidney Ponson. Oh, and, by the way, the Yankees finished in third in 2008 and missed making the post-season for the first time in what seemed like forever.

    What’s that line about those who do not learn from history being damned to repeat it?

    Comments on Cashman: What, Me Worry? I Have Until July!

    1. MJ Recanati
      December 20th, 2010 | 3:46 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Was hoping that would change some with Hal and Cashman now in charge. I think it has, to a certain extent.

      I think it has too. The Yankees are not, and likely never will be, the model of efficiency. But they’re getting better every year now that Boss isn’t in charge.

    2. December 20th, 2010 | 3:48 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:
      There’s a difference between Cliff Lee and Kevin Millwood. Could the Yankees get somebody in between? Or, again, pursue Andy Pettitte (and I don’t believe for a minute that he would be annoyed if the Yanks pursued him.)

    3. Raf
      December 20th, 2010 | 3:49 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Also, was not specifically referring to Yankees management there, but the reaction here (and elsewhere) to Cashman’s quote.

      As was I. The current regime, and to be honest it has been that way since George was suspended, doesn’t have a history of making panic moves.

    4. MJ Recanati
      December 20th, 2010 | 3:50 pm

      lisaswan wrote:

      There’s a difference between Cliff Lee and Kevin Millwood. Could the Yankees get somebody in between?

      Here’s a list of the 2011 free agents. Show me who you’re thinking of.

      http://mlbcontracts.blogspot.com/2001/05/potential-free-agents-for-2011.html

      You see anything you like? I don’t.

    5. Evan3457
      December 20th, 2010 | 3:51 pm

      Raf wrote:

      @ Evan3457:
      To be fair, both Hughes and Kennedy got hurt in 2008, and Kennedy had surgery to repair an aneurysm in 2009.

      Absolutely true; but I think the organization soured on Kennedy’s “relaxed” attitude after his repeated beatings in 2008. Had he not been dealt in the Granderson trade, it would’ve taken several rotation injuries and a signed note from God for him to get another.

    6. MJ Recanati
      December 20th, 2010 | 3:52 pm

      lisaswan wrote:

      Or, again, pursue Andy Pettitte (and I don’t believe for a minute that he would be annoyed if the Yanks pursued him.)

      Whether he’d be annoyed or not is irrelevant. Since neither you nor I know if Cashman and Pettitte are in dialogue, there’s hardly a point to assuming that they are (or aren’t).

      If Andy wants to come back, he knows he’s got a contract waiting for him at around $12-15M. I imagine that Cashman told Pettitte he’s welcome back and that, should he decide to return, it’ll only take a phone call and a few faxes to get it done.

    7. MJ Recanati
      December 20th, 2010 | 3:54 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Had he not been dealt in the Granderson trade, it would’ve taken several rotation injuries and a signed note from God for him to get another.

      Perhaps. But considering the Yankees just got their best everyday work from a CF since Bernie Williams in 2002 (or 2003?), it’s not a trade worth revisiting. A starting CF is worth more than a 5th starter in my opinion.

    8. Evan3457
      December 20th, 2010 | 3:55 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      Was hoping that would change some with Hal and Cashman now in charge. I think it has, to a certain extent.
      I think it has too. The Yankees are not, and likely never will be, the model of efficiency. But they’re getting better every year now that Boss isn’t in charge.

      Efficiency can never be maximized while maintaining the hard-line ideology of “must win World Series every year”.
      You don’t get to take a “sabbatical” year like the Sox did last year when the injuries strike. The Sox took their lumps, had a ton of money going out, waited like a cobra to strike, and pounced on Crawford and Gonzalez when they became available. That’s how it’s done.

      But you have to have a mature ownership willing to take the heat from a fanatical fan base paying through the nose and a media that thinks it knows more about baseball than the professional men running the outfit. If your ownership can stand its ground, then you can afford to be patient, which makes being efficient a helluva lot easier.

    9. ken
      December 20th, 2010 | 3:57 pm

      It takes YEARS to change the makeup of a team/organization. We are still living with the misguided Boss-directed efforts that started with signing Giambi and continued with many other expensive acquisitions and trading of prospects. It is finally starting to turn around for the better.

      Don’t forget, if George was not suspended from baseball, it is very possible that some or all of today’s “core four” would have been stars elsewhere. He did not have the patience to let prospects mature. Signing Giambi changed the philosophy of the team that was built and won in the 90’s. If George were alive, no way 2/3 of the outfield today would be Gardner and Swish. More likely to have aging former stars making 20m/yr in all 3 positions.

    10. MJ Recanati
      December 20th, 2010 | 3:57 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Efficiency can never be maximized while maintaining the hard-line ideology of “must win World Series every year”.

      Agreed. I’m not lamenting it; I completely understand. Just pointing out that there is an equilibrium that the Yankees are approaching between the short-sighted and the long-dated moves. Whereas the Yankees under Boss lived for today alone, Cashman is helping the team strike a more rational balance between today and tomorrow.

    11. Evan3457
      December 20th, 2010 | 3:58 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      Had he not been dealt in the Granderson trade, it would’ve taken several rotation injuries and a signed note from God for him to get another.
      Perhaps. But considering the Yankees just got their best everyday work from a CF since Bernie Williams in 2002 (or 2003?), it’s not a trade worth revisiting. A starting CF is worth more than a 5th starter in my opinion.

      Was not saying that trading for Granderson was bad. It wasn’t.

      Was saying that had they not minimized Kennedy, they might have been able to get Granderson at a lower overall cost. Might have been able to keep Coke, for instance, or maybe get a righty reliever back. That’s the efficiency I’m talking about.

      The Kennedy they traded for Granderson, well that deal’s OK in my book, too. But if Kennedy had been permitted to develop, they could’ve gotten more for him…or paid less for Granderson. Or something.

    12. Ryan81
      December 20th, 2010 | 3:59 pm

      Cashman has more than enough parts to make a trade. The question is does he give up the right parts for the right players. Despite the fact that I am currently not the least impressed that this is the rotation that $200 million gets the Yankees right now, I’m not going to harp on Cashman for not getting a starting pitcher tomorrow. He can be patient; the games don’t start for another 3 1/2 months and the “real ones” don’t start until September. On top of that, I personally thought the Mariners would be in contention, if not win, the AL West last year, which would’ve meant Lee should have never been on the market. The point is, the trade market is weak, Cashman has no leverage currently, and is doing the right thing by not letting the Royals/Mariners/Marlins/whoever ask for the moon and the stars for basically a name Cashman can take back to the Steinbrenners and the fan base as a moral victory.

      That being said, can anyone please point to me any moment in this guy’s soon-to-be-14th season with the Yankees that says he’ll get us the above-average pitcher that can make a positive contribution as a 2nd or 3rd starter in the playoffs at the trade deadline? And that doesn’t even include the fact that hopefully he doesn’t trade away another Rookie of the Year. Cashman and his transaction history, so heavily based on throwing money at players like CC and Tex, just doesn’t inspire any confidence in me or most other Yankee fans right now.

    13. Ryan81
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:00 pm

      Jesus you guys really are having a heated discussion.

    14. Evan3457
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:00 pm

      ken wrote:

      It takes YEARS to change the makeup of a team/organization. We are still living with the misguided Boss-directed efforts that started with signing Giambi and continued with many other expensive acquisitions and trading of prospects. It is finally starting to turn around for the better.
      Don’t forget, if George was not suspended from baseball, it is very possible that some or all of today’s “core four” would have been stars elsewhere. He did not have the patience to let prospects mature. Signing Giambi changed the philosophy of the team that was built and won in the 90′s. If George were alive, no way 2/3 of the outfield today would be Gardner and Swish. More likely to have aging former stars making 20m/yr in all 3 positions.

      Bingo. This, very much.

    15. Raf
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:04 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      You don’t get to take a “sabbatical” year like the Sox did last year when the injuries strike. The Sox took their lumps, had a ton of money going out, waited like a cobra to strike, and pounced on Crawford and Gonzalez when they became available. That’s how it’s done.

      Yeah, but they’ve been in on Gonzalez for a while, and I’m sure they could’ve gone another season with the OF alignment they had planned for 2010. They had the opportunity to make clear upgrades, and they took advantage. Nothing wrong with that.

    16. MJ Recanati
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:04 pm

      Ryan81 wrote:

      That being said, can anyone please point to me any moment in this guy’s soon-to-be-14th season with the Yankees that says he’ll get us the above-average pitcher that can make a positive contribution as a 2nd or 3rd starter in the playoffs at the trade deadline?

      Had Cashman traded for #2 or #3 starters in previous years, it might be a fair question to ask and then look back on history.

      However, in my recollection — and I am just going off the top of my head here — the majority of trade deadline deals that Cashman has made have been for bullpen and bench reinforcements and not for mid-rotation starters. Thus, it’s probably hard to answer your question if there’s no history of such.

    17. Raf
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:05 pm

      Ryan81 wrote:

      On top of that, I personally thought the Mariners would be in contention, if not win, the AL West last year

      Really? I thought they had a shot, but a lot needed to go right in order for that to happen.

    18. MJ Recanati
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:07 pm

      Raf wrote:

      They had the opportunity to make clear upgrades, and they took advantage. Nothing wrong with that.

      Nope. And now this is more or less their team for the next few years. They’re pretty well locked in at 1B, LF (or RF, if they move Crawford to the more defensively-challenging position at Fenway), 3B, 2B and SP1/SP2 (by salary, anyway, not by talent/performance).

      The Red Sox saw an opening and they took it. They saw a horrid crop of 2012 free agents and rightly addressed holes on their roster.

    19. MJ Recanati
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:11 pm

      Raf wrote:

      I thought [the Mariners] had a shot, but a lot needed to go right in order for that to happen.

      I can actually see Ryan81’s point here. They had two aces and a closer coming off a good year. Their defensive-whiz CF was projected to have a big offensive season based on 2009, their leadoff hitter is still a solid 4-5 win player. In a division as bad as the AL West, I don’t think it was that much of a stretch to think the M’s could win the division with 90 wins. After all, that’s all it took for the Rangers to win it.

      Vegas had the M’s as a 10/1 AL Pennant team. By contrast, they had the Rays at 12/1. That obviously doesn’t mean a lot but it does tell you what “crowdsourcing” thought of the M’s relative to where casinos would set their lines to attract bets. I know, because I bought a $10 ticket on them in February 2010 just to see if I could luck my way into $100.

    20. Raf
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:14 pm

      ken wrote:

      It takes YEARS to change the makeup of a team/organization. We are still living with the misguided Boss-directed efforts that started with signing Giambi and continued with many other expensive acquisitions and trading of prospects. It is finally starting to turn around for the better.

      It started and continued long before that. I would say the collusion of the 80’s hurt the Yanks more than anything else.

    21. jrk
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:24 pm

      Why has no one answered the question we all want to know? Those who are unhappy right now, WHAT DO YOU WANT CASHMAN TO DO RIGHT NOW? (Steve? Lisa?) At this instant moment. I just see complaining for inaction with no good solution?

    22. jrk
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:26 pm

      Also, does anything else think we should try out a few “low-risk, high-reward” possibilities? I know some people on this site don’t like that term, but if you can sign relatively low contracts with guys like Bedard, Duchscherer, Sheets, Webb, why not give it a shot? Sign a couple, one might just work out?

    23. Corey Italiano
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:27 pm

      This conversation has gone far too long for me to be able to say something that hasn’t been said.

      What I will say is, I wonder how much it would cost to trade for Edwin Jackson. If Andy doesn’t sign, he could be a pretty good number 3. He’s in his walk year and the Sox need to dump a little bit of money (not that Jackson’s price tag is that exorbitant)…throw in a couple of prospects, could be a match.

    24. December 20th, 2010 | 4:28 pm

      Ryan81 wrote:

      Jesus you guys really are having a heated discussion.

      My fault. Heaven forbid I ever shine a light on Cashman or A-Rod.

    25. Corey Italiano
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:28 pm

      @ Corey Italiano:
      And I’d think, since he’s in his walk year, that he’d be cheaper than Gavin Floyd, whom the Yankees have been rumored to be looking at.

    26. MJ Recanati
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:30 pm

      jrk wrote:

      if you can sign relatively low contracts with guys like Bedard, Duchscherer, Sheets, Webb, why not give it a shot? Sign a couple, one might just work out?

      Absolutely. No reason not to allocate $6M on that crop of guys and see which (if any) can potentially make it back. It worked once with Jon Leiber and sort of worked with Octavio Dotel…may as well try again. The Yanks lose nothing.

    27. December 20th, 2010 | 4:33 pm

      jrk wrote:

      Why has no one answered the question we all want to know? Those who are unhappy right now, WHAT DO YOU WANT CASHMAN TO DO RIGHT NOW? (Steve? Lisa?) At this instant moment. I just see complaining for inaction with no good solution?

      That’s sort of like asking Bernie Madoff what can he do now to fix the mess he created. Of course, there’s not much that can be done NOW. But, it doesn’t mean he shouldn’t be held accountable for allowing it to happen in the first place.

    28. MJ Recanati
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:34 pm

      @ Corey Italiano:
      Considering what the White Sox paid to get Edwin, I’d imagine they’d try to recoup their loss. I don’t see a very good fit, personally.

      Also, just curious, but why do you say the White Sox are trying to trim payroll? They just spent around $100M on Adam Dunn and Paul Konerko so it doesn’t seem to me like they’re in the mood to sell right now.

    29. MJ Recanati
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:35 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      That’s sort of like asking Bernie Madoff what can he do now to fix the mess he created. Of course, there’s no much that can be done NOW. But, it doesn’t mean he shouldn’t be held accountable for allowing it to happen in the first place.

      Hyperbole.

    30. Raf
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:35 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      Ryan81 wrote:
      Jesus you guys really are having a heated discussion.
      My fault. Heaven forbid I ever shine a light on Cashman or A-Rod.

      Note the caliber of discussion, and compare it to say, ESPN, NYDN or MLB.

      Anyway, I’ve been here long enough to know the issue isn’t “shining a light” on Cashman or A-Rod.

    31. MJ Recanati
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:36 pm

      Raf wrote:

      Anyway, I’ve been here long enough to know the issue isn’t “shining a light” on Cashman or A-Rod.

      Glad someone said it. I didn’t want to be the first…

    32. Ryan81
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:39 pm

      @ Raf:
      You’re gonna have a pretty solid shot in a weak division with Hernandez and Lee as your 1-2 punch in the rotation. Not to mention a lineup that could be deadly at their career seasons or when they’re not getting into screaming matches in the dugout.

      @ MJ Recanati:
      Cashman however has a very spotty history when it comes to that as well. Look at how many of his trade deadline moves actually helped the Yankees. And when I mean helped, I mean “the Yankees couldn’t have made the playoffs without them.” I would say that list starts with: Abreu, Justice…am i missing anybody? Aaron Boone’s one swing? Maybe Kerry Wood last year? Does El Duque count? Even his bullpen help/bench reinforcements (Berkman, Pudge Rodriguez, Nady, Lidle, Chacon, Loaiza, even back to the days of Weaver and Mondesi) have been some of his most epic failures.

      Cashman’s trades at the deadline look great on paper, and the Yankees farm system is always hyped. Yet when you look back in hindsight, they really are not that impressive. And trades at the deadline, which also include trying to weed out the prospects that you think will be more successful than others, are not as easy and straightforward to pull off as going to a big-time free agent and offering him $50 million more than another team.

    33. jrk
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:46 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      That’s sort of like asking Bernie Madoff what can he do now to fix the mess he created. Of course, there’s not much that can be done NOW. But, it doesn’t mean he shouldn’t be held accountable for allowing it to happen in the first place.

      Are you serious? You are comparing defrauding investors out of billions of dollars and ruining people’s lives to assembling a baseball team? I don’t think Brian Cashman’s son (if he has one) will be committing suicide anytime soon because his father didn’t sign Cliff Lee.

    34. December 20th, 2010 | 4:47 pm

      I’m not going to jump in fully here, because Raf, MJ, and Evan have basically covered everything I want to say, but I will make 2 points:

      1) The Yankees never, ever offered Montero for Soria. It was an unsubstantiated piggyback by Stark on a report by Heyman that guessed Montero might be involved. Ken Davidoff debunked it later and said the offer was never made, according to all of his sources within the organization.

      2) Cashman does need a light pointed at him, and he needs to be held accountable for putting the team in this position. Of course, being that the position is coming off making the playoffs in 12 of his 13 years as the GM, including 4 titles, one as recently as 2009, and an ALCS last season, AND doing it within the budget that his owners are comfortable with (as opposed to the imaginary constraints Steve would prefer that he act within to serve some sort of need he has to do it cheaper), being held accountable will likely mean a nice contract extension after the 2011 season.

    35. Ryan81
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:55 pm

      @ Steve Lombardi:, @ MJ Recanati:, @ jrk:
      Is it hyperbole to compare Cashman to Madoff? Yes. It’s a baseball team, not really life and death.

      How bout comparing it to Cameron totaling his dad’s special collector’s Ferrari in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. He can’t go out and buy another Ferrari, but it doesn’t mean he will or should get off without punishment.

    36. MJ Recanati
      December 20th, 2010 | 4:55 pm

      Ryan81 wrote:

      Look at how many of his trade deadline moves actually helped the Yankees. And when I mean helped, I mean “the Yankees couldn’t have made the playoffs without them.”

      Fortunately for the Yanks, there have been few, if any, trades where the Yankees absolutely needed to make the trade in order to make the playoffs. The great majority of their trades have been to address holes for the playoff run, not to make the playoffs themselves. Thus, again, it’s hard to answer your question when you’re asking about circumstances that may not be applicable.

      But, ignoring that for a second, Abreu, Wood, Justice and Chacon are excellent examples of productive mid-season trades. El Duque as an international free agent signing.

      Not sure how Weaver was an epic failure in 2002. In 78 innings he pitched to a 110 ERA+. Stellar? No. But epic failure in 2002? No, not at all.

    37. MJ Recanati
      December 20th, 2010 | 5:00 pm

      yagottagotomo1 wrote:

      Cashman does need a light pointed at him, and he needs to be held accountable for putting the team in this position. Of course, being that the position is coming off making the playoffs in 12 of his 13 years as the GM, including 4 titles, one as recently as 2009, and an ALCS last season, AND doing it within the budget that his owners are comfortable with (as opposed to the imaginary constraints Steve would prefer that he act within to serve some sort of need he has to do it cheaper), being held accountable will likely mean a nice contract extension after the 2011 season.

      Yes.

    38. Raf
      December 20th, 2010 | 5:06 pm

      @ Ryan81:
      Yeah, but the past few years, the M’s have been giving up more runs than they have scored. The 1-2 punch was nice (1-2-3 if Bedard was healthy), but I don’t know if the offense and defense would’ve been enough for them to keep up. Figured they would get into a lot of 1-run games and those can go either way.

    39. Raf
      December 20th, 2010 | 5:12 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Not sure how Weaver was an epic failure in 2002. In 78 innings he pitched to a 110 ERA+. Stellar? No. But epic failure in 2002? No, not at all.

      That 2002 rotation had Mussina, Clemens, Pettitte, Duque and Wells, 5 proven starters… And they didn’t escape the first round.

    40. December 20th, 2010 | 7:11 pm

      Memo to self: Good call going with the Madoff analogy rather than the Susan Smith one I first considered.

    41. Evan3457
      December 20th, 2010 | 7:17 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      Memo to self: Good call going with the Madoff analogy rather than the Susan Smith one I first considered.

      Have you tried decaffeinated? Maybe you should. 🙂

    42. jay
      December 20th, 2010 | 9:55 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:
      Just wonderful. So, it’s going to be “2008″ again in Yankeeland – in 2011. Remember then? That’s when Cashman went with kids like Hughes and Kennedy in the rotation to start the season. And, they were later replaced with Darrell Rasner and Sidney Ponson. Oh, and, by the way, the Yankees finished in third in 2008 and missed making the post-season for the first time in what seemed like forever.

      Correlation does not equal causation. The 2008 Yankees had trouble scoring runs.

      Steve Lombardi wrote:@ Raf:
      Park Index. New Yankee Stadium was a homer haven in 2009.

      ESPN’s 2008 Yankee Stadium park index: 1.040
      ESPN’s 2009 Yankee Stadium park index: 0.965

      E-mail me on the side if you’d like me to explain how park factors work.

      Agenda-driven, comically bad analysis. I love this site.

    43. December 20th, 2010 | 10:14 pm

      @ jay:
      I think I may have asked you this before, but, in any event, what does that say about you?

    44. jay
      December 20th, 2010 | 10:28 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      @ jay:
      I think I may have asked you this before, but, in any event, what does that say about you?

      What does what say about me? That I find this site entertaining? It says that… I find this site entertaining.

    45. BOHAN
      December 21st, 2010 | 1:33 am

      lisaswan wrote:

      How Cashman can go from saying his offseason priority was, “pitching, pitching, and more pitching” to saying it’s okay to have big gaping holes in the rotation for the first four months of the year is astonishing

      I get what you’re saying here but in reality this offseason there was only two good pitchers on the market (free agent or via trade) and Cashman did everything he could to get hime to come to NY and the other has some mental issues, can’t think of a better way to put it, that might not have been very good in NY. Especially for the amount of talent they wouldve had to give up

    46. BOHAN
      December 21st, 2010 | 1:39 am

      before i respond to this i havent read everything on here so if i repeat something someone else said im sorry
      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      Uh, yeah. 20% of his rotation is TBD right now.

      the key words in thi statement is “right now.” Its December, lets go go nuts and say this team is screwed. they can compete with what they have right now and there’s definately going to be a team that falls out of contention by july that they can trade for.

    47. BOHAN
      December 21st, 2010 | 1:44 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      @ EHawk:
      Interesting article. Sherman’s logic was lost on me, however. He’s making a prediction that Felix Hernandez will be traded based on a patter of previous AL Cy Young Award winners being traded? That’s sort of silly, if you ask me.Hernandez is due to earn $10M in 2011; in other words, he’s super-cheap right now. Hernandez doesn’t get more expensive until the 2012-2014 seasons when he’ll earn, on average, $19.3M per season for those three seasons. That means the Mariners have all of the 2011 season and all of next offseason to cash in on a controlled asset that happens to be, arguably, the best pitcher in the American League.I don’t see the Mariners trading Hernandez before next offseason at the absolute earliest.

      i completely understand what you’re saying there about the Mariners having all of 2011 and the offseason to cash in but dont you think they’ll be better off trading during the season when they can more for him for a contending team with an incentive to trade for him then in the offseason when it isnt as “necessary?”

    48. BOHAN
      December 21st, 2010 | 1:48 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:It may well be that given the current market of available/price, the Yanks’ best move is to wait, tread water with what they have, and hope for a better market at the deadline. Even if it’s not the best move, the best thing for Cashman to say is what he keeps saying. I don’t understand why people have such trouble with the concept that if keep talking about how much you need starting pitching, how much you want starting pitching, how desperate you are for starting pitching, the price goes UP, not down. Now, you may not be able to fool other teams bluffing strong hand, but it can’t hurt to try. As it happens, the Yanks are still a good team, just not the strongest team at the moment. They are very likely to be well within the race after 60 games (mid-June). At that point, they can assess what the have and what they need, assess the market to see what’s available and for what price.So when Cashman says he has until at least July, it’s 1) a strong bluff position, 2) might actually work out if Nova comes through, and 3) the right thing to be saying publicly, whether he really believes it or not.Good heavens, why is Evan the only one that understands this?

      I understand it, just havent been on here lately to chime in.

    49. MJ Recanati
      December 21st, 2010 | 6:36 am

      BOHAN wrote:

      i completely understand what you’re saying there about the Mariners having all of 2011 and the offseason to cash in but dont you think they’ll be better off trading during the season when they can more for him for a contending team with an incentive to trade for him then in the offseason when it isnt as “necessary?”

      Maybe, maybe not. In general, it always helps the selling team to have as many suitors as possible in order to extract the highest price for their asset. While it is certainly possible that an in-season trade could create that scenario, it’s also possible that letting the market develop even longer could create more suitors.

      One could argue that the Royals jumped the gun by trading Greinke this weekend instead of waiting until July or next offseason. I’m not necessarily saying that Hernandez can’t be traded before July but I’d imagine that the Mariners would want to keep him as long as he’s affordable and then offer him up to teams when they can no longer afford him. After all, even if they can’t afford him, an acquiring team would still have three full seasons of control so they’d theoretically be willing to pay to acquire him next year.

    50. Raf
      December 21st, 2010 | 10:28 am

      BOHAN wrote:

      the key words in thi statement is “right now.” Its December, lets go go nuts and say this team is screwed. they can compete with what they have right now and there’s definately going to be a team that falls out of contention by july that they can trade for.

      Yep. They already have 5 starters, and a couple of guys on the farm to step in if needed. When all those options are exhausted, and there’s no one available to trade, THEN you panic.

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