• Bean Counter Hal More Interested In QuickBook Tally Than Winning?

    Posted by on December 21st, 2010 · Comments (24)

    Via Andrew Marchand:

    Before the Derek Jeter saga unfolded, an agent told ESPNNewYork.com that we would learn a lot about how Hal Steinbrenner’s Yankees will be run, about how Hal will be different from his old man.

    The typically shy Hal immediately went to the airwaves to say that the Jeter negotiations could become “messy” — which was just like King George — but his reason was very un-Boss-like.

    “I’m running a business,” Steinbrenner said on 1050 ESPN New York’s The Michael Kay Show.

    Further evidence of how Hal’s business will be run came in the form of Tuesday’s AP report that the Yankees’ luxury tax is $18 million, which is the lowest for the team in seven years.

    Yankees’ salaries were dropped to a still major-league high $215 million in 2010 from $226 million in 2009 and an upbeat GM Brian Cashman said Tuesday they are currently in the $170 million range.

    From Hal’s reluctance to speak in public to his reliance on spreadsheets, he is unlike his father in many ways, except for one — the way he will be judged by his team’s fans.

    He must win and win big or his budgets and business-like approach will be as unpopular as his father’s bombastic style was during the mid-’80s.

    You can run a business, play “messy” with the Captain and even lower the luxury tax, but, if you do it, at these Stadium prices, you better win.

    Hal has not let us know him like George did, but, from what we do know, it is hard to imagine that Hal took the loss to the Rangers in the ALCS as hard as his father would have. It is difficult to think that it has driven him as much as a defeat would have eaten at the Boss’ soul. With Hal, we are still learning what it all means to him, if he burns to win as much as the fans and his father always did.

    After the Jeter press conference to announce the Captain was coming back, Hal, when talking about Lee, made a point to emphasize that he likes his budgets. This might play well in a board room, but it is doubtful it will be as popular in the bleachers; especially if it becomes evident that the Yankees’ failure to go all the way with Lee cost them a title.

    These are Hal’s Yankees, where the GM clearly states that Plan B is patience. Again, touting a stronger farm system, this may turn out to be the right approach. Cashman has until July to match Boston’s big offseason.

    Cashman seems to be relishing the chance to show brains instead of just bucks, sounding almost as if he is bragging that the current payroll is lower than it’s been in years.

    This more measured, budget-conscience long-range approach may turn out to be lethal on the competition. It better be, because if the Yankees stop winning, the fans will be furious at the Boss’ son and the Bombers’ new-fangled frugality.

    …Cashman seems to be relishing the chance to show brains instead of just bucks…

    Be afraid Yankees fans. Be very, very, afraid.

    Comments on Bean Counter Hal More Interested In QuickBook Tally Than Winning?

    1. Ryan81
      December 21st, 2010 | 11:58 pm

      Bring the payroll down? How bout if you’re gonna be content with trotting Sergio Mitre out to the mound then don’t charge 9 bucks for a beer in your stadium.

    2. Raf
      December 22nd, 2010 | 12:03 am

      Of course, it goes without saying that no one knows what “show brains instead of just bucks” means…

    3. Evan3457
      December 22nd, 2010 | 12:55 am

      They’re being extra-frugal right now because there’s no one available out there that they want to (or should) spend big bucks on.

      When someone they really like becomes available, if there’s a match, they’ll spend prospects, and if necessary, big bucks on him.

      …same as it ever was.
      …same as it ever was.
      …same as it ever was.

    4. MJ Recanati
      December 22nd, 2010 | 6:53 am

      Ryan81 wrote:

      Bring the payroll down? How bout if you’re gonna be content with trotting Sergio Mitre out to the mound then don’t charge 9 bucks for a beer in your stadium.

      There’s minimal correlation between team payroll and concession prices. The payroll is nearly self-sustaining thanks to the value of Yankees media rights and sponsorship.

      Concessions are tied to the debt service on stadium construction costs.

    5. MJ Recanati
      December 22nd, 2010 | 9:08 am

      Andrew Marchand wrote:

      This more measured, budget-conscience long-range approach may turn out to be lethal on the competition. It better be, because if the Yankees stop winning, the fans will be furious at the Boss’ son and the Bombers’ new-fangled frugality.

      The Yankees have $112M in obligations on the books for the 2013 season, and that includes only five players (Rodriguez, Sabathia, Teixeira, Burnett and Jeter). Marchand should cool it on all the “frugality” talk when we can rest assured that the Yankees won’t fill the remaining 20 roster spots for less than $60M and probably closer to $100M.

      The Yanks are the same team they’ve always been. One offseason doesn’t change that.

    6. Corey Italiano
      December 22nd, 2010 | 9:15 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Concessions are tied to the debt service on stadium construction costs.

      It’s not like the concessions will drop in price once the debt is paid, though.

    7. MJ Recanati
      December 22nd, 2010 | 9:33 am

      Corey Italiano wrote:

      It’s not like the concessions will drop in price once the debt is paid, though.

      No, but that’s not the point. They’ve set a price point that people are willing to pay, hence they’ve most likely found the supply/demand equilibrium.

      That the money from concessions goes to stadium finance debt (among other places) is just to discount the misguided notion that a $9 beer is tied to a $30M player salary.

    8. December 22nd, 2010 | 10:23 am

      Hey, guys, help me out. Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who decided to go with Randy Winn, Nick Johnson and Javy Vazquez last year? Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who traded Ted Lilly for Jeff Weaver? Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who decided to do with Hughes and Kennedy in the rotation in 2008? Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who traded Tyler Clippard to the Washington Nationals for Jonathan Albaladejo? Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who made the Mike Lowell trade? Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who traded Ross Ohlendorf and Jose Tabata for Xavier Nady and Damaso Marte – and then extented the contract of Marte?

    9. Ryan81
      December 22nd, 2010 | 10:42 am

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      No, no. The Lilly move and the Lowell trade happened before the Boss was incapacitated, thus were all Steinbrenner’s fault. That’s mainly why Cashman has all this job security after 14 years. He’ll tell everybody that every great move is his doing; every bad one…well, (points finger like a 7-year-old) that was Steinbrenner!

      And I don’t think trading guys like Clippard, Ohlendorf, Tabata, and Kennedy from our “incredible farm system” are anything to complain about. Sure, Cash could’ve traded somebody like Kennedy at his peak before the whole world knew he threw like a girl and was most suited for an average career in the NL West. But my biggest complaint is that the best player to come up through the Yankees farm system in the 5 years since Cashman took “complete control” now plays center field for the Detroit Tigers.

    10. G.I. Joey
      December 22nd, 2010 | 11:13 am

      Ryan81 wrote:
      But my biggest complaint is that the best player to come up through the Yankees farm system in the 5 years since Cashman took “complete control” now plays center field for the Detroit Tigers.

      And Steve would agree with you there, but there are many people that have argued on this blog that the Granderson trade was a good one, myself included.

    11. GDH
      December 22nd, 2010 | 11:46 am

      Same Cash-Bash. Flip a coin – heads Cashman’s a tool, tails Cashman’s a tool. Own it man, you just don’t like the way he parts (what’s left of) his hair.

      There’s a couple things you can’t take away from Brian Cashman: He’s lowering the payroll in a year when the market is soft. That’s a good thing, seeing as how there’s a lot of long-term money already spent. He’s developed a decent farm system with multiple prospects at a variety of positions. And, if he’s so f’ing stupid, then I’ll take stupid, because we’ve been to the playoffs every year except 08 (injuries, offense) and made it to the ALCS with virtually the same team that returns next year.

      We didn’t get Cliff Lee after throwing Fort Knox at him? BFD. Lee Schmee. I’m glad we didn’t have to commit 7 years to that guy. We’ll be a good team this year. Look at the Phillies – right now they look like a lock, and no one will be surprised if they win the WS this year, but they’re NOT a lock, they have a very solid rotation and lots of questions in the lineup and bullpen. That team last year was in jeopardy of not making the playoffs. That’s the final litmus test. As long as we make the playoffs, Cashman has done his job. The further we go, the better.

    12. MJ Recanati
      December 22nd, 2010 | 11:56 am

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      Hey, guys, help me out. Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who decided to go with Randy Winn, Nick Johnson and Javy Vazquez last year? Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who traded Ted Lilly for Jeff Weaver? Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who decided to do with Hughes and Kennedy in the rotation in 2008? Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who traded Tyler Clippard to the Washington Nationals for Jonathan Albaladejo? Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who made the Mike Lowell trade? Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who traded Ross Ohlendorf and Jose Tabata for Xavier Nady and Damaso Marte – and then extented the contract of Marte?

      We’ve been through this a million times. You see it your way, others see it in a more nuanced and even-tempered way. Everyone is entitled to their opinion but the validity of an opinion breaks down at a certain point when facts and context are intentionally omitted.

    13. MJ Recanati
      December 22nd, 2010 | 12:11 pm

      @ Ryan81:
      We can’t presume to know exactly how much control Cashman did or didn’t have before October 2005. Since there’s no way to adequately apportion credit or blame for the moved before 2005 which draw so much ire around here, it’s best to just leave them alone. Those moves are done and we just don’t know who the responsible party was and to what extent.

      Ryan81 wrote:

      And I don’t think trading guys like Clippard, Ohlendorf, Tabata, and Kennedy from our “incredible farm system” are anything to complain about. Sure, Cash could’ve traded somebody like Kennedy at his peak before the whole world knew he threw like a girl and was most suited for an average career in the NL West. But my biggest complaint is that the best player to come up through the Yankees farm system in the 5 years since Cashman took “complete control” now plays center field for the Detroit Tigers.

      I don’t see how you can argue two sides of the same issue. If you contend (as you are doing here and have done in other threads) that the Yankee farm system is overrated and that no players of any consequence are ever developed (you cite Clippard, Ohlendorf, Tabata and Kennedy as evidence) then it should hardly matter that the Yankees traded Austin Jackson last year.

      If you think highly of Austin Jackson then it begs the question of why you think so little of the Yankee farm system overall. Further, as I’ve explained to you countless times over, the Yankees rarely, if ever, permit for the development of a prospect at the major league level. More often than not, they keep the best of their prospects, use the rest as currency in trade offers and place a very low degree of value on apprenticeship at the major league level.

      As such, the Yankees clearly preferred an established veteran in Granderson over the developmental learning curve of Austin Jackson. For 2010 only, it was an astute decision as Granderson performed capably. It remains to be seen what this trade looks like in the future but, if and when Jackson is ever able to make the Yankees yearn for him, the Yankees will have moved onto their next All-Star at that position. The Yankees don’t typically wait around for developmental candidates.

    14. Raf
      December 22nd, 2010 | 12:22 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      Hey, guys, help me out. Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who decided to go with Randy Winn, Nick Johnson and Javy Vazquez last year? Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who traded Ted Lilly for Jeff Weaver? Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who decided to do with Hughes and Kennedy in the rotation in 2008? Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who traded Tyler Clippard to the Washington Nationals for Jonathan Albaladejo? Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who made the Mike Lowell trade? Wasn’t it the “smart” Cashman who traded Ross Ohlendorf and Jose Tabata for Xavier Nady and Damaso Marte – and then extented the contract of Marte?

      Why yes, yes it was. Mind you the same GM traded Wilson Betemit for Nick Swisher, Hideki Irabu for Jake Westbrook and Ted Lilly, Westbrook and Ledee for David Justice, GlenAllen Hill for Ben Ford, Bobby Abreu for C.J. Henry, Jesus Sanchez, Carlos Monasterios & Matt Smith, Alex Rodriguez for Alfonso Soriano, Chuck Knoblauch for Brian Buchanan, Cristian Guzman & Eric Milton… Same GM that picked up Chien Ming Wang, Orlando Hernandez, Soriano & Cano off the int’l market. Same guy that worked Hughes, Kennedy, Chamberlain, Wang, Gardner, Cano, Cabrera, into the lineup… So on and so forth.

      Not sure why you decided to go “there” ;)

    15. Raf
      December 22nd, 2010 | 12:35 pm

      G.I. Joey wrote:

      Ryan81 wrote:
      And Steve would agree with you there, but there are many people that have argued on this blog that the Granderson trade was a good one, myself included.

      http://waswatching.com/2009/08/05/austin-jackson-prospect-or-suspect/

      http://waswatching.com/2010/01/19/wynegar-austin-jackson-is-not-ready-for-prime-time/

    16. December 22nd, 2010 | 2:57 pm

      Raf wrote:

      Why yes, yes it was. Mind you the same GM traded Wilson Betemit for Nick Swisher, Hideki Irabu for Jake Westbrook and Ted Lilly, Westbrook and Ledee for David Justice, GlenAllen Hill for Ben Ford, Bobby Abreu for C.J. Henry, Jesus Sanchez, Carlos Monasterios & Matt Smith, Alex Rodriguez for Alfonso Soriano, Chuck Knoblauch for Brian Buchanan, Cristian Guzman & Eric Milton… Same GM that picked up Chien Ming Wang, Orlando Hernandez, Soriano & Cano off the int’l market. Same guy that worked Hughes, Kennedy, Chamberlain, Wang, Gardner, Cano, Cabrera, into the lineup… So on and so forth.
      Not sure why you decided to go “there”

      Sure, I’ll go there.

      ~~Wilson Betemit for Nick Swisher.~~
      Salary dump. The White Sox, and Ozzie Guillen, were looking to dump Swisher anywhere.

      ~~Hideki Irabu for Jake Westbrook and Ted Lilly~~
      Just proves that Jim Beattie was an even more clueless GM than Cashman

      ~~Westbrook and Ledee for David Justice.~~
      He got lucky with Justice the Juicer. And, on the long-term, Ledee turned out to be the more useful player.

      ~~GlenAllen Hill for Ben Ford.~~
      Got lucky with Hill hopped up on PEDs.

      ~~Bobby Abreu for C.J. Henry, Jesus Sanchez, Carlos Monasterios & Matt Smith.~~
      Salary dump, the Phils couldn’t wait to unload Abreu.

      ~~Alex Rodriguez for Alfonso Soriano.~~
      Salary dump, Texas had to get rid of A-Rod.

      ~~Chuck Knoblauch for Brian Buchanan, Cristian Guzman & Eric Milton~~
      Salary dump/player pending free agency, IIRC. Twins had to make a move and Guzman and Milton were useful to them.

      ~~Same GM that picked up Chien Ming Wang, Orlando Hernandez, Soriano & Cano off the int’l market. Same guy that worked Hughes, Kennedy, Chamberlain, Wang, Gardner, Cano, Cabrera, into the lineup… So on and so forth.~~

      It’s been noted many times that Newman and/Damon O. are on point for international signees and draft choices and Cashman has little to do with it – other the green light the monster bonuses given the likes of Wang, El Duque, Joba, et al. But, if you want to “go there” – and say these are Cashman – then you have to count all the busts on both of these fronts (Cole, Morales, et al) that more than out number the hits here.

    17. MJ Recanati
      December 22nd, 2010 | 3:36 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      ~~Wilson Betemit for Nick Swisher.~~
      Salary dump. The White Sox, and Ozzie Guillen, were looking to dump Swisher anywhere.

      Salary dumps count. There are plenty of other players with contracts that teams are looking to move that aren’t good trade targets. The key is identifying an asset that is undervalued by the seller and then alleviating the seller’s contractual burden while also getting a valuable player in return. Thus, despite the fact that the White Sox had a player they didn’t like for personal and/or financial reasons, the Yankees identified a player with good peripherals that was a candidate to bounce back and provide value.

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      ~~Westbrook and Ledee for David Justice.~~
      He got lucky with Justice the Juicer. And, on the long-term, Ledee turned out to be the more useful player.

      You don’t “get lucky” with a player that had been worth 3 bWAR, on average, over the previous three seasons and was a career .283/.382/.505 career hitter. PED’s or not, the player had tremendous value and the resume to back it up. As for Ricky Ledee…um…you realize he added up to 1.7 bWAR for his entire career? David Justice provided literally twice as much value in 18 months in New York than Ledee provided in his entire career. Nice try though.

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      ~~GlenAllen Hill for Ben Ford.~~
      Got lucky with Hill hopped up on PEDs.

      PED use is irrelevant. This is apparently your newest moving target: discounting good personnel moves based on selective morality.

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      ~~Bobby Abreu for C.J. Henry, Jesus Sanchez, Carlos Monasterios & Matt Smith.~~
      Salary dump, the Phils couldn’t wait to unload Abreu.

      Again, salary dumps count.

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      ~~Alex Rodriguez for Alfonso Soriano.~~
      Salary dump, Texas had to get rid of A-Rod.

      Not only do salary dumps count but, for the first three seasons Rodriguez was on the team, his freight was paid by the Rangers. Irrespective of your own extreme distaste for the player, he has nevertheless been the most valuable Yankee since he joined the team.

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      ~~Chuck Knoblauch for Brian Buchanan, Cristian Guzman & Eric Milton~~
      Salary dump/player pending free agency, IIRC. Twins had to make a move and Guzman and Milton were useful to them.

      Once again, salary dumps count. Christian Guzman was worth 4 bWAR in his six seasons in Minnesota, Milton was worth 13.2 bWAR in his six seasons. Knoblauch was worth 6.6 bWAR over four seasons. A nice haul for Minnesota but you have to give value to get it. Given the fact that the Yankee rotation featured Cone, Pettitte, Clemens, Wells and Hernandez (and, later Mussina) during Knoblauch’s time in New York, it’s hard to see where Milton would’ve fit in. Guzman? Obviously he was redundant; the Yankees had Jeter.

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      ~~Same GM that picked up Chien Ming Wang, Orlando Hernandez, Soriano & Cano off the int’l market. Same guy that worked Hughes, Kennedy, Chamberlain, Wang, Gardner, Cano, Cabrera, into the lineup… So on and so forth.~~It’s been noted many times that Newman and/Damon O. are on point for international signees and draft choices and Cashman has little to do with it – other the green light the monster bonuses given the likes of Wang, El Duque, Joba, et al. But, if you want to “go there” – and say these are Cashman – then you have to count all the busts on both of these fronts (Cole, Morales, et al) that more than out number the hits here.

      The General Manager is the head of the baseball operations department. As such, he is the point-person for credit for all of the department’s successes and blame for all of its failures. Prospects are a numbers game; you need to accumulate a lot of them to hit on just a few of them. On balance, the Yankees have done a good — but not perfect — job of accumulating amateur talent through international free agency and, lately, through the draft. That Cashman has little to do with it doesn’t really matter. Credit goes to those that work for Cashman but also to Cashman himself for hiring competent people.

    18. Raf
      December 22nd, 2010 | 3:44 pm

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      You do know that Cecil Fielder, Tino Martinez, Jeff Nelson, David Cone, John Wetteland, among others were salary dumps too. Do the Yankees not get credit for those too?

    19. MJ Recanati
      December 22nd, 2010 | 3:51 pm

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      One overarching point that needs to be made separate and apart from what I said about salary dumps in re: Swisher directly above:

      Your criticism of Cashman is that he is nothing without Steinbrenner’s money. Yet you’ve never conceded that his replacement, whoever that might be — be it someone of your own choosing or otherwise — will never run the team differently. According to Forbes Magazine, the Yankees are worth $1.6B as of April 2010. That’s literally twice the sum of the next closest team (Boston; $800M). As long as the Yankees have the money, they will continue to flex their financial might. There’s not only no reason for them not to do so, they will simply be doing what they’ve always done.

      Since the advent of free agency, the Yankees have been the single-biggest payor of player salaries. From Reggie Jackson, Catfish Hunter and Goose Gossage to Rickey Henderson and Dave Winfield to the Yankees of recent vintage (David Cone, Roger Clemens, David Wells, Wade Boggs, Jimmy Key, Jason Giambi, Mike Mussina, etc.). This is how the Yankees have operated. Brian Cashman hasn’t done anything his predecessors haven’t done. Thus, your complaints that Cashman can do nothing but collect salary dumps or sign big checks in free agency is really just a continuation of business as usual since Steinbrenner first bought the team.

      You dislike Cashman. To this point, you’ve yet to give a legitimate reason for that dislike. If you simply dislike him for personal reasons, that’s certainly your right. But every time you try to argue facts, you run into the same problem of selective argumentation. It’s why most of your fact-based arguments get picked on around here.

    20. Raf
      December 22nd, 2010 | 4:00 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      Got lucky with Hill hopped up on PEDs.

      Yet, Hill was hitting .262/.303/.494 at the time of the trade, did he change prescriptions on the way to NY? :D

      ~~Westbrook and Ledee for David Justice.~~
      And, on the long-term, Ledee turned out to be the more useful player.

      I dunno about that, Justice was eventually flipped for Robin Ventura, who was flipped for Proctor and Crosby. Ledee was flipped for David Segui and Felix Rodriguez… ;)

      If you’re discounting moves based on “morality,” a team that has employed the likes of Darryl Strawberry, Steve Howe, Dwight Gooden, Luis Polonia, among others can’t really take the moral high ground :D

    21. MJ Recanati
      December 22nd, 2010 | 4:03 pm

      @ Raf:
      Take a look at Justice’s bWAR on the Yankees vs. Ledee’s bWAR for his career. It’s not even funny. I’ll give Steve a pass on that one because he was probably writing it in the heat of the moment — it happens to everyone from time to time — but, wow, he couldn’t have been more wrong on that claim.

    22. Evan3457
      December 22nd, 2010 | 8:57 pm

      The Swisher trade was not a “salary dump”. A pure salary dump is when a player of high value is traded because the team that has him can’t afford either his current salary or the salary he’s projected to earn going forward. In the case of Swisher, he was traded because 1) he had a terrible season, 2) he an Ozzie did not see eye to eye about how to play the game, and 3) because the White Sox thought he was worthless, which is how you get a guy who’s proven he can hit 25-30 homers a season and knock in 80-100 runs a season for a crappy utility infielder and two AA relief pitchers. The Swisher trade was not anything like a salary dump. It was a misjudgement of his value, one that Cashman took advantage of, and one that has helped the Yanks the past two seasons.

      The A-Rod-Soriano-Arias trade was not purely a salary dump either, because in return for A-Rod, the Rangers got a player who had, in the two years right before he got traded, put up lines of .300-39-102 and .290-38-91, was presumed to be 25 years old, had made the All-Star team two years in a row, and was 3rd in the MVP voting in 2002. He would go on to make the All-Star team both years in Texas, and, all told, 5 straight seasons after he left the Yanks.

      You wanna know what a real salary dump is? David Cone for three prospects, only one of whom made the majors, and none of whom amounted to anything significant.

      Ryan81 wrote:

      And I don’t think trading guys like Clippard, Ohlendorf, Tabata, and Kennedy from our “incredible farm system” are anything to complain about. Sure, Cash could’ve traded somebody like Kennedy at his peak before the whole world knew he threw like a girl and was most suited for an average career in the NL West. But my biggest complaint is that the best player to come up through the Yankees farm system in the 5 years since Cashman took “complete control” now plays center field for the Detroit Tigers.

      Tabata still has time (if his age is correctly listed) to turn into a valuable player for the Pirates. Nevertheless, that trade was crucial to the Yanks’ winning it all last year, because Marte was off the DL long enough to pitch brilliantly in the post-season, especially against Howard and Utley in the World Series.

      Meanwhile, MJ is correct: the Yanks were not about to start the 2010 season with an Opening Day outfield of Gardner, Jackson and Swisher. Never could have happened.

    23. Evan3457
      December 22nd, 2010 | 9:03 pm

      Oh, and NOBODY thought Kennedy was a high-ceiling starter, ever. They thought he would make the majors on his command of an assortment of pitchers, and he was labeled a #4 starter (with a ceiling of #3) long before the Yanks traded him in the Granderson deal.

      He did manage to put up a WAR this year of 2.7 (Baseball-Ref), and 2.4 (Fangraphs). That’s a fairly valuable pitcher, about the same value as Hughes last season.

    24. BOHAN
      December 23rd, 2010 | 8:17 pm

      Ryan81 wrote:

      Bring the payroll down? How bout if you’re gonna be content with trotting Sergio Mitre out to the mound then don’t charge 9 bucks for a beer in your stadium.

      6 bucks in the bleachers as long as you don’t get the souvenir cup.

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