• Brian Cashman, Wannabe Celebrity

    Posted by on January 27th, 2011 · Comments (59)

    That’s Brian Cashman tending bar last night at Foley’s, wearing the same bandana-and-spiked-hair wig that he wore when he rappelled down a building in Stamford, Connecticut, last Christmas.

    Enough with the “look at me” photo-ops, huh, Cash?

    I know, I know, it’s for charity. Then again, remember what Big Stein always used to say? It was: “If you do something for someone and more than two people know about it, meaning you and that person, then you did it for the wrong reason.”

    Word, Boss. Word.

    At this point, I would much rather have someone who is “no name” – but a real and qualified “baseball person” – someone trying to make his bones as a hard working GM, running the Yankees. Someone who just wants to do his job, and well, with no fanfare or excuses, rather than someone who is running around town in a wig speaking at pancake breakfasts, jumping off buildings, tending bar – and getting his picture on TV and in the papers.

    Gabe Paul and Stick Michael just did their job without using it as a platform to attain celebrity status. Cashman should follow that example instead of trying to be like Billy Beane, Theo Epstein and Kenny Williams – making a “name” for himself for doing things outside of the office. Guys like John Schuerholz and Pat Gillick did it right. Cashman’s inflated sense of self-importance and need for admiration is getting old in a hurry here. I just hope the Yankees put an end to it – and soon.

    Comments on Brian Cashman, Wannabe Celebrity

    1. Corey Italiano
      January 27th, 2011 | 9:44 am

      By showing the picture, aren’t you just adding to it? If you despise it so much, ignore it and it’ll be a non-story.

    2. January 27th, 2011 | 9:46 am

      Certain charity events do not lend themselves to anonymity. The idea here was to get other people to come to the bar and donate, and the way to do that is to use somebody’s celebrity status. It isn’t a matter of giving recognition to the celebrity, it is a matter or drawing money to the event.

    3. January 27th, 2011 | 9:49 am

      Corey Italiano wrote:

      By showing the picture, aren’t you just adding to it? If you despise it so much, ignore it and it’ll be a non-story.

      If you had a neighbor who threw wild and noisy parties until 4 am every week, should you not report it, and ignore it, and just hope that not bringing attention to it would make it go away?

    4. January 27th, 2011 | 9:51 am

      yagottagotomo1 wrote:

      Certain charity events do not lend themselves to anonymity. The idea here was to get other people to come to the bar and donate, and the way to do that is to use somebody’s celebrity status.

      That’s my point. The GM of the Yankees should not have “celebrity status.” That’s not in the job description. He’s not a movie star or pop music performer. His role is to run a baseball team – not have his picture in the paper or shown on TV.

    5. Raf
      January 27th, 2011 | 9:52 am

      Then again, remember what Big Stein always used to say?

      Yeah; “you’re fired” perhaps using varying levels of profanity.

    6. January 27th, 2011 | 9:53 am

      The GM of the Yankees, by nature, has celebrity status that can be used to do some good. If Pat Gillick was the GM, he would have drawing power as well. I’m not sure why you begrudge him the ability to use that status to do charitable deeds.

    7. January 27th, 2011 | 9:56 am

      yagottagotomo1 wrote:

      If Pat Gillick was the GM, he would have drawing power as well.

      Last time I checked, Gillick, a Hall of Fame GM, never wore a wig to get his picture in the paper when he was running BTB World Champions in Toronto or when he was buidling a powerhouse team in Philly.

    8. Raf
      January 27th, 2011 | 9:56 am

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      His role is to run a baseball team

      And through that role he has achieved “celebrity status.” He was also inducted into Foley’s HOF, IIRC.

      There’s nothing wrong with people doing things in their spare time, most people with lives do ;)

    9. Raf
      January 27th, 2011 | 10:00 am

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      If you had a neighbor who threw wild and noisy parties until 4 am every week, should you not report it, and ignore it, and just hope that not bringing attention to it would make it go away?

      I’m sure wild and noisy parties violate some sort of town/city/village ordinance. I don’t think Cashman being a “celebrity bartender” qualifies.

    10. January 27th, 2011 | 10:00 am

      Yes, Gillick never did those exact things. But I bet he has participated in charity events that were covered by the media. Also, the key distinction is that he was never the GM of the Yankees, quite possibly the highest-profile front office job in sports.

    11. Raf
      January 27th, 2011 | 10:06 am

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      yagottagotomo1 wrote:
      If Pat Gillick was the GM, he would have drawing power as well.
      Last time I checked, Gillick, a Hall of Fame GM, never wore a wig to get his picture in the paper when he was running BTB World Champions in Toronto or when he was buidling a powerhouse team in Philly.

      Perhaps nobody cared enough about him in Philly, Seattle, Baltimore or Toronto to give him a call?

    12. January 27th, 2011 | 10:09 am

      yagottagotomo1 wrote:

      Also, the key distinction is that he was never the GM of the Yankees, quite possibly the highest-profile front office job in sports.

      Only if the person in it tries to make it that way, like Cashman. Again, see Gabe Paul and Stick Michael. They realized that it was the owners who should have the profile, not the GM.

    13. January 27th, 2011 | 10:19 am

      Those guys lived in a different era, when George was larger than life and the media was limited. Apples and oranges.

    14. Evan3457
      January 27th, 2011 | 10:20 am

      In this case, Hal doesn’t want the profile, and Hank’s profile is quite big enough.

      If they don’t have a problem with what Cashman’s doing, and apparently, they don’t, then I don’t, either.

      If you want to have a problem with it, it’s OK with me. Not that you need my permission or anything.

    15. Raf
      January 27th, 2011 | 10:23 am

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      Only if the person in it tries to make it that way, like Cashman. Again, see Gabe Paul and Stick Michael. They realized that it was the owners who should have the profile, not the GM.

      If anything, it’s the players that should have the profile. Normally, people couldn’t care less about the owners. Had Steinbrenner stuck to building ships chances are he would’ve remained in anonymity.

    16. January 27th, 2011 | 10:25 am

      I just really don’t get the venom here.

      If I asked to do something because of my status and because of that status, more people would come out and support a charity or people could come and enjoy themselves (the Heights/Lights festival), why WOULDN’T I do it?

      People can complain about “celebrity status”, but the matter is the money Bill Gates, Oprah, and other celebrities help raise and give money to charities are going out to those charities whether someone likes who they are and their approach or not.

      Cashman’s presence was for raising money for Ed Randall’s Bat For the Cure, which promotes prostate cancer awareness and prevention. Definitely a worthy cause and many of my friends who attended were able to talk to Cashman, order stronger-than-usual drinks, and, in turn, help raise money for the foundation.

      The most important thing that seems to get lost in this post is this: I can only hope that Cashman’s “celebrity” status brought in more money and awareness than was expected and that Bat for the Cure continues to fight for its cause. Considering I have a very close relative who just beat prostate cancer, the awareness is definitely needed.

    17. MJ Recanati
      January 27th, 2011 | 10:34 am

      The following post ran on this very blog on January 13th:

      http://waswatching.com/2011/01/13/reminds-me-of-the-old-joke-that-starts-kei-igawa-walks-into-a-bar/

      At the bottom of the excerpted press release was the following:

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      Seriously, it’s for a good cause.

      Two weeks later we have a post about how Brian Cashman is a “wannabe celebrity” and whose charitable instincts are somehow fraudulent because they’re not being excercised privately (or at least out of the public eye).

      What changed in two weeks Steve? If you knew Cashman was going to be a guest bartender two weeks ago and you thought it was a good cause then why the criticism now?

    18. LMJ229
      January 27th, 2011 | 10:36 am

      Please, there is nothing wrong with what Cashman did. Don’t make a mountain out of a molehill. The only thing I take exception to is that ridiculous bandana and spiked hair wig!

    19. MJ Recanati
      January 27th, 2011 | 10:36 am

      Brent wrote:

      Considering I have a very close relative who just beat prostate cancer, the awareness is definitely needed.

      My dad is a prostate cancer survivor. I’m all for anything that raises awareness and money to help find better treatment methods for those that have been through this disease.

    20. Raf
      January 27th, 2011 | 10:39 am

      LMJ229 wrote:

      The only thing I take exception to is that ridiculous bandana and spiked hair wig!

      Yep :D

    21. Zach
      January 27th, 2011 | 10:41 am

      Yo, I’ve been reading this blog for about two years now, and it used to be really cool. I remember when this was a Yankees blog, not a anti-Brian Cashman website. If you were gonna switch topics on us, why not give us a heads up?

      This is quite possibly the stupidest post I’ve ever seen by such a talented writer. Of course Cashman is a household name in the baseball world- he works the New York Yankees and is responsible for some of the biggest contracts and trades of the past few decades! If his presence at a charity event brings in more donations for the charity, he would be wrong not to get involved.

      Steve, this is the 21st century. With the explosion of information, especially on websites/blogs such as this one, the Yankees GM is going to reach a certain level on fame. Same thing with Epstein and Minaya- big markets, big moves, and a big fanbase.

      We, the Yankee fans and bloggers, are the reason he is so famous. It is we who dissect every move he makes and argue over who could do a better job. The next Yankee GM will have just as much fame/notoriety.

      Dislike Cashman all you want, but you’d be more persuasive if your arguments were somewhat logical.

    22. MJ Recanati
      January 27th, 2011 | 11:05 am

      Zach wrote:

      Dislike Cashman all you want, but you’d be more persuasive if your arguments were somewhat logical.

      I agree but I’d rephrase it this way:

      “Dislike Cashman all you want but don’t worry about his charity work because it has nothing to do with the Yankees or his ability to run the ballclub.”

    23. #15
      January 27th, 2011 | 11:05 am

      I don’t know guys…. The needle is starting to rise on my weirdshit-o-meter. A lot of us do charity stuff. It’s one thing to volunteer for the dunk tank seat for a good cause, and another to do it wearing a bikini and fishnet stockings. Tone it down a notch, get Andy signed, and get us into the postseason.

    24. LMJ229
      January 27th, 2011 | 11:18 am

      #15 wrote:

      I don’t know guys…. The needle is starting to rise on my weirdshit-o-meter. A lot of us do charity stuff. It’s one thing to volunteer for the dunk tank seat for a good cause, and another to do it wearing a bikini and fishnet stockings.

      I have to admit, I was a little surprised about the whole elf rappeling down a building thing.

    25. MJ Recanati
      January 27th, 2011 | 11:34 am

      #15 wrote:

      Tone it down a notch, get Andy signed, and get us into the postseason.

      He could tone it down to staying at the office 22 hours a day and it wouldn’t change certain things which are beyond his control.

      If Andy Pettitte chooses not to pitch in 2011, it wasn’t because his GM was doing a charity event while wearing a wig and a bandana;

      If Cliff Lee chooses not to pitch for the Yankees in 2011, it wasn’t because the GM was dressed as a Christmas elf in Connecticut;

      If the next best starting pitcher on the free agent market was Carl Pavano — a guy everyone hates and would rather not sign irrespective of whether he could help the team or not — it wasn’t because the GM spoke at a breakfast in midtown Manhattan.

      None of this stuff matters. Not one iota.

    26. LMJ229
      January 27th, 2011 | 11:51 am

      #15 wrote:

      I don’t know guys…. The needle is starting to rise on my weirdshit-o-meter.

      I’m thinking all of this is happening because George is no longer around. The Boss probably kept a tight rein on his “celebrity” appearances and his interviews. All of this “weirdshit” stuff is happening since George passed.

    27. #15
      January 27th, 2011 | 12:37 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:
      So… following that logic… No holds barred, huh? How ’bout a spin for Cash on Dancing with the Stars in navy blue rubber pants to stamp out animal cruelty? Or a three part episode of Pimp my Crib to raise awareness about homelessness? Better yet, how ’bout Survivor Man Central Park with just a loin cloth and a pocket knife – all in the name of charity. In the interest of best serving his company, there are limits to what a business exec ought to be doing, and more to your point, there are players that don’t want to be part of a circus. I think we’ve seen enough non-baseball stuff this off season that was heading toward the wrong side of the dignity/class threshold. Let the Mets (remember the lovely Mrs. Benson in her elf outfit from a while back?) and the Jets (ahh… the agony of defeet) swim in that pond. If his main objective was to help a cause in which he believed deeply, he could 1) quietly write a large check, and 2) quietly hit up his rich friends to do the same. Neither of those options would result in a goofy picture on the back page of the Post. That, I’m starting to think, was really the point of these episodes. Tone it down a notch.

    28. Ryan81
      January 27th, 2011 | 12:39 pm

      You know, I’m not bashing the whole “raising money for charity aspect” but I’m quite frankly sick and tired of hearing the name Brian Cashman in the news now, charity or not. If this is truly his last season in New York, I’d rather bring in somebody with a basically anonymous name around baseball because I shouldn’t be hearing this much about the GM of any team. I personally like to follow the Yankees for the 25 players on the field and not the front office sideshow. And I’m not the only one who thinks this; even a site that’s completely up Cashman’s asshole thinks this is a little much: http://nomaas.org/2011/01/serenity-now/

    29. MJ Recanati
      January 27th, 2011 | 12:43 pm

      @ #15:
      You’re letting hyperbole get the best of you.

      #15 wrote:

      I think we’ve seen enough non-baseball stuff this off season that was heading toward the wrong side of the dignity/class threshold. Let the Mets (remember the lovely Mrs. Benson in her elf outfit from a while back?) and the Jets (ahh… the agony of defeet) swim in that pond.

      The Mets (or the Jets for that matter) don’t lack for championships because of anything that Mrs. Benson or anyone else did. While I do enjoy some level of the whole “Yankee way” stuff, people take it too far. The Yankees’ shit stinks, just like everyone else’s.

      #15 wrote:

      If his main objective was to help a cause in which he believed deeply, he could 1) quietly write a large check, and 2) quietly hit up his rich friends to do the same.

      There is more than one way to skin a cat. One could argue that part of being charitable isn’t just writing a check and forgetting about the cause. One could argue that actually being present and taking part in an event such as this shows charity of time, in addition to charity of purpose.

    30. MJ Recanati
      January 27th, 2011 | 12:45 pm

      Ryan81 wrote:

      I’d rather bring in somebody with a basically anonymous name around baseball because I shouldn’t be hearing this much about the GM of any team.

      Good luck with that. Not only will any successor to Cashman not be anonymous for long but, realisticaly, you should accept the fact that the next GM may be a “name” GM since the Steinbrenners and Randy Levine appear to be easily fascinated by names.

    31. Sharktopus
      January 27th, 2011 | 12:50 pm

      What a hack job, Lombardi. Why do you even root for the Yankees if you just incessantly complain about everything they do. Cashman does work for charities…waaaaaaaaaahhh how dare him! he should be fired!. Game 6 of 2009 World Series…waaahhh 2004 all over again! Fire Cashman!

      Grow up Lombardi, and go write some real articles.

    32. Raf
      January 27th, 2011 | 1:38 pm

      #15 wrote:

      there are players that don’t want to be part of a circus

      Have you been watching the Yankees for the past, oh, 35 years?

      Given the shenanigans that have transpired over the years, the GM doing charity celebrity guest bartender work barely registers on the scale…

    33. Raf
      January 27th, 2011 | 1:40 pm

      Ryan81 wrote:

      New York, I’d rather bring in somebody with a basically anonymous name around baseball because I shouldn’t be hearing this much about the GM of any team.

      Part and parcel of working in NY on a slow news day.

    34. Raf
      January 27th, 2011 | 1:44 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      The Mets (or the Jets for that matter) don’t lack for championships because of anything that Mrs. Benson or anyone else did.

      And even when they did, I don’t think the club was made up of shrinking violets.

    35. Evan3457
      January 27th, 2011 | 2:01 pm

      Guys, seriously, I much rather you bash Cashman for mistakes both perceived and real, than for this.

      This is being made way, way too much out of.

    36. Evan3457
      January 27th, 2011 | 2:02 pm

      That’s just my opinion. (Forgot to add.)

    37. Raf
      January 27th, 2011 | 2:10 pm

      LMJ229 wrote:

      The Boss probably kept a tight rein on his “celebrity” appearances and his interviews.

      Only because he cultivated an image as an ogre. Even so, it didn’t stop him from doing things like beer and credit card commercials, or dropping his pants on SNL.

    38. MJ Recanati
      January 27th, 2011 | 2:27 pm

      Raf wrote:

      Only because he cultivated an image as an ogre.

      Yep. One of the funniest things I ever heard was the description of how Jerry Seinfeld pitched the idea of a Steinbrenner character to the Boss. Steinbrenner basically walked right into the stereotype…

    39. MJ Recanati
      January 27th, 2011 | 2:28 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Guys, seriously, I much rather you bash Cashman for mistakes both perceived and real, than for this.This is being made way, way too much out of.

      So true.

    40. 77yankees
      January 27th, 2011 | 2:53 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Guys, seriously, I much rather you bash Cashman for mistakes both perceived and real, than for this.
      This is being made way, way too much out of.

      Really – I mean the whole Cashman back and forth here has been going on for years now, and we know where everyone stands on it and nobody’s opinion is going to change.

      It’s jumped the shark, all. Let’s move on.

    41. #15
      January 27th, 2011 | 3:49 pm

      @ Raf:
      I would agree that there was a circus atmosphere in the 70 and 80′s with all the Billy in/Billy out nonsense, Big Stein suspensions, fights in the locker room, fights with marshmellow salesmen and fights with unidentified elevator toughs, the Winfield garbage etc… But, I’d hardly describe the ’95 to present run as a circus. Button down, maybe too button down, at times. There was steroid stuff to deal wth, but most teams with a pulse had to deal with the same at some point. Given the choice, I’ll take my teams and their exec’s a bit on the professional, quiet side, and I prefer the stories to be about what happens between the lines most of the time.

    42. BOHAN
      January 27th, 2011 | 4:09 pm

      How about we talk about baseball??? spring training is 18 days away… this is a ridiculous post

    43. BOHAN
      January 27th, 2011 | 4:18 pm

      Lets talk about Keith Law’s top 100 prospects and how the yankees have 5 players on it? and tied for the 4th most?

    44. January 27th, 2011 | 6:53 pm

      I don’t know what’s going on with Brian, this whole thing reeks of midlife crisis.

    45. January 27th, 2011 | 7:26 pm

      Cashman is getting his face out there, more and more, to market his imagine, etc. It’s probably all part of his master plan to walk away from the Yankees at the end of the year and become a talking head at ESPN like Steve Phillips was before he got himself tossed. And, if he does it, he’ll probably be great at it. Cashman can talk the ears off Dumbo if you give him enough time.

    46. January 27th, 2011 | 7:36 pm

      @ Steve Lombardi:

      That’s a good point; I could definitely see him on ESPN.

    47. January 27th, 2011 | 7:55 pm

      @ Joseph Maloney:
      Makes sense. He lives in and loves CT. ESPN is right there. The money will be good. Less stress. Shorter hours. And, the media backlash will be lighter since he’ll be part of the media. And, he can do that as long as he wants until someone decides to offer him something else to his liking.

      Personally, when he’s done with the Yankees, I hope he writes a book, like Torre, and then we can see if he gets roasted like Torre did.

    48. Raf
      January 27th, 2011 | 8:46 pm

      #15 wrote:

      But, I’d hardly describe the ’95 to present run as a circus. Button down, maybe too button down, at times.

      David Wells getting into fights at diners, Gary Sheffield mouthing off, Doc and Darrly getting arrested, Chili Davis smacking his SO around, Showalter & Michael’s firing, Torre’s firing (call it what you want, they were all fired), Randy Johnson vs cameramen, the Carl Pavano saga… So on and so forth.

    49. Raf
      January 27th, 2011 | 8:48 pm

      Joseph Maloney wrote:

      I don’t know what’s going on with Brian, this whole thing reeks of midlife crisis.

      If this is a midlife crisis, it’s pretty lame. I always thought that if I were to have one, I’d be dating college bunnies and driving fast cars and having hair implants or something.

    50. Evan3457
      January 27th, 2011 | 10:51 pm

      Mid-life crisis?
      Seeking publicity for an ESPN gig?
      =====================================================
      At this point I invoke Lupica’s Law, a sort of ass-backwards Godwin’s Law (look it up) for sports arguments. (And my own creation, to boot.)

      Just read his latest “masterpiece” in the Daily News, 3 internet pages of drivel in search of a story. Sounds a lot like some of the comments here.

      Anyway, Lupica’s Law goes like this:

      If you’re parroting Mike Lupica’s points, or anything close, you lose the argument by default.

    51. LMJ229
      January 28th, 2011 | 12:46 am

      I found this article on Brian Cashman very interesting. It is outdated but I just thought I’d throw it out there for the sake of conversation.

      http://nymag.com/nymetro/news/sports/features/9611/

    52. MJ Recanati
      January 28th, 2011 | 7:01 am

      Raf wrote:

      Chili Davis smacking his SO around

      I don’t remember that one. Probably for the better!

      Raf wrote:

      I always thought that if I were to have one, I’d be dating college bunnies and driving fast cars and having hair implants or something.

      I’d be right there with you, minus the hair implants but plus $2000 handmade suits like John Gotti’s. :-D

    53. MJ Recanati
      January 28th, 2011 | 7:03 am

      Evan3457 wrote:

      At this point I invoke Lupica’s Law, a sort of ass-backwards Godwin’s Law (look it up) for sports arguments. (And my own creation, to boot.)

      An excellent concept. From now on simply writing “Lupica’s Law” will be the best way to say “agree to disagree, you simpleton jackass!” ;-)

    54. Evan3457
      January 28th, 2011 | 7:35 am

      …and we all bash Joel Sherman from time to time here, but his take on Cashman is the exact opposite of Lupica’s, probably because Cashman is a good source for Sherman on a regular basis…

      http://tinyurl.com/475bypr

      Which one to believe? Why, whichever one supports your already established position. This is a free country; determine your position, THEN look for supporting facts and arguments.

    55. Raf
      January 28th, 2011 | 9:31 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      I don’t remember that one. Probably for the better!

      Yeah, I’m going to have to retract that one, that happened in the early 2000′s after he was off the team. I got my timelines messed up.

      Not that I’m absolving him of what he did or allegedly did, but it’s outside the scope of the topic.

    56. January 28th, 2011 | 10:45 am

      To some, it may not change minds, but I just read that Cashman’s father-in-law died from prostate cancer, the same cancer the organization he was helping raise money for is fighting against.

      I just wonder how would people feel if he decided to run a marathon next. Would that be a noble way of raising money and awareness or would that be just to show off his “celebrity”?

      Either way, good was done and Cashman helped support an organization that works with a cause that he feels strongly about. Good for him.

    57. bags
      January 28th, 2011 | 12:39 pm

      Steve, you post about Brian Cashman all the time. It has been clear for a very long time that you don’t like him as the GM of the Yankees. What’s clear from this post is that you not only don’t like Brian Cashman as the GM of the Yankees. You also simply don’t like Brian Cashman. The guy. Not the GM. Not sure why not. But it is good to know. Makes your other posts make more sense.

    58. January 30th, 2011 | 8:36 am

      Via Ed Randall’s site today:

      Ed Randall’s Fans for the Cure presents its annual Mets Hot Stove Report, as Ed Randall interviews Mets General Manager Sandy Alderson and takes your questions.

      Join us at 12th Floor Lounge in the Leon Lowenstein Building on the Lincoln Center Campus of Fordham University (enter on 60th Street) Tuesday evening, February 1st, from 7:00-9:00PM.

      Individual Tickets cost $45.00

      All proceeds benefit Ed Randall’s Fan’s for the Cure charity to further its lifesaving mission of prostate cancer awareness and education.

      Note, this is the same charity that was supported by Foley’s with Cashman. Something tells me that Sandy won’t be wearing a spiked hair wig and posing for pictures in his support of this charity.

    59. Raf
      January 30th, 2011 | 10:59 am

      Doesn’t look like he’ll be bartending, or entering their Hall of Fame either… Alderson isn’t a 12th Floor Lounge regular, nor has he been on the NYC baseball landscape for 10+ years.

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