• Fat Joba

    Posted by on February 16th, 2011 · Comments (27)

    Brian Cashman is not finding Joba Chamberlain to be pleasingly plump this Spring.

    In any event, seems like Joba is taking the Brian Bruney career path…and that can’t be good.

    Comments on Fat Joba

    1. jrk
      February 16th, 2011 | 4:12 pm

      Probably better to reserve judgment at this point. Joba claims he is stronger, so maybe it is muscle and not fat. I’ll give him the benefit of the doubt and wait to judge him based on his performance.

      Then again, maybe in his desperate state to save his career, he resorted to PEDs. ;) JK…kinda.

    2. LMJ229
      February 16th, 2011 | 4:14 pm

      I’m becoming increasingly frustrated with Joba. He has not lived up to the potential he showed when he was first brought up. Last year it was a drinking problem and now this. He clearly is not committed to becoming an elite athlete and I also question where his head is at. I’m thinking he will be no more than a “one hit wonder” for us.

    3. #15
      February 16th, 2011 | 6:09 pm

      Fat, drunk and stupid is no way to go through life.

      Can’t he see that by pissing away his career at this stage, he’s also pissing away the chance to piss away his life while living in the lap of luxury… He would just have to work hard for ~3-5 years and then he could party himself to death.

    4. K-V-C
      February 16th, 2011 | 6:49 pm

      I’m willing to get him the spring to see if he is stronger, but I think his Yankee career could be ending soon.

    5. February 16th, 2011 | 8:21 pm

      Keep in mind, in baseball speak, a guy losing 30 pounds means he really lost 15 pounds. And, a guy who gained 15 pounds really gained 30 pounds.

    6. GDH
      February 17th, 2011 | 12:57 pm

      Barring an exceptional performance, he’ll be in another uniform by August 1, if not earlier. Hopefully as part of package for someone with impact, and not a one-for-one scrapheap trade.

    7. MJ Recanati
      February 17th, 2011 | 3:41 pm

      GDH wrote:

      Barring an exceptional performance, he’ll be in another uniform by August 1, if not earlier.

      I remain hopeful that this is the case. I can’t wait until that piece of garbage is someone else’s problem.

      GDH wrote:

      Hopefully as part of package for someone with impact

      I highly doubt that at this point. The Yankees have done a pretty good job of destroying Chamberlain’s trade value.

      GDH wrote:

      and not a one-for-one scrapheap trade.

      I don’t think that’s how it’ll go down. I just think that Chamberlain will be the throw-in on some larger deal that, a few years ago, would’ve had him as a headliner instead of as an afterthought/package-sweetener.

    8. GDH
      February 18th, 2011 | 10:50 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      I just think that Chamberlain will be the throw-in on some larger deal that, a few years ago, would’ve had him as a headliner instead of as an afterthought/package-sweetener.

      I’m afraid you’re right and this is what all the hype and BS has finally come down to.

    9. #15
      February 18th, 2011 | 12:51 pm

      @ GDH:
      I’m afraid you’re right and this is what all the hype and BS has finally come down to.

      Sadly, it wasn’t all hype. Joba showed electric stuff at times and not just briefly. He’s just not dedicated enough at this stage to max out his potential. I know it’s not a popular thing to say anymore, but Joba would have done well to spend some more time around Clemens. Roids aside, Roger was able to motivate a number of good pitchers to dig down and get better by rigorous fitness. Ultimatley Joba is responsible for Joba, but sometimes the right mentor, saying the right words, at the right time can make a huge difference. Even the guys on MLB Radio are cracking on his girth. Hopefully his teammates are getting in his face (privately) and telling him to push away from the buffet. At his weight, he can drop 15 pounds over the course of Spring training without much trouble. A little more time on the bike, a few extra wind sprints, salads for lunch…. and… no alcohol.

    10. MJ Recanati
      February 18th, 2011 | 2:58 pm

      @ #15:
      I agree completely. Time with Clemens honestly would’ve done #62 a lot of good. But even if it had not been Clemens, someone should’ve helped #62 realize that his talents were being improperly focused on winning at beer-pong or the Nathan’s Hot Dog contest instead of on the mound.

    11. redbug
      February 19th, 2011 | 8:37 am

      Joba has sat next to Mo and learned nothing.

    12. agsf
      February 20th, 2011 | 2:09 am

      #15 wrote:

      but Joba would have done well to spend some more time around Clemens.

      People love to believe this. The one case where clemens supposedly got through to a pitcher was schilling, years ago, and it was one conversation. I’m sure clemens had time for that one conversation with joba many times.

      Read what pearlman wrote in his recent book on clemens. Clemens had very little interest in hanging around to help anyone. Look at some of the young yankee pitchers that clemens was around for longer periods of time. How many did he help? See any turnarounds?

      Do you really think clemens knows more about pitching than Rivera? How about andy? The moose? They spent a lot of time with joba.

      Sure, I get it, similar type pitchers. That’s about it. Clemens could have been his roommate for an entire year and it wouldn’t have made a difference. This whole fantasy of the veteran saving the big leaguer with all the talent but who just needs a push is largely a myth, but a myth that for some reason has been attached to clemens more than any other pitcher. Here’s a clue. Clemens can barely spell Cat. He’s driven, for himself. You can’t pass that on. You can’t teach it. You have a better chance of teaching clemens how to spell cat.

      For the love of god, leave the “if only joba had spent time around clemens’ drivel at home. It’s embarrassing.

    13. Raf
      February 20th, 2011 | 9:23 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      But even if it had not been Clemens, someone should’ve helped #62 realize that his talents were being improperly focused on winning at beer-pong or the Nathan’s Hot Dog contest instead of on the mound.

      David Wells pitched 21 years in the bigs. David Weathers lasted 19. Bob Wickman, 15. Rick Reuschel, 19. So on and so forth. Chamberlain being plus sized isn’t going to doom him to failure. Besides, pitchers of all shapes and sizes have succeeded and failed in MLB.

      At least lets see how he pitches before condemning him.

    14. #15
      February 20th, 2011 | 4:18 pm

      @ agsf:
      Spoken like someone that’s not spent much time in a locker room.

    15. #15
      February 20th, 2011 | 4:28 pm

      @ agsf:
      Here’s a partial list off major leaguers with firsthand knowledge that disagree with you..

      http://www.usatoday.com/sports/baseball/2006-04-16-clemens-cover_x.htm

    16. MJ Recanati
      February 22nd, 2011 | 6:42 pm

      Raf wrote:

      David Wells pitched 21 years in the bigs. David Weathers lasted 19. Bob Wickman, 15. Rick Reuschel, 19. So on and so forth. Chamberlain being plus sized isn’t going to doom him to failure. Besides, pitchers of all shapes and sizes have succeeded and failed in MLB.At least lets see how he pitches before condemning him.

      A fat player getting fatter whose performances are getting worse not better isn’t exactly a good enough reason to rationalize it all away by citing examples of other famously fat pitchers.

      When your career is spiraling downward — from phenom setup man to ace starter to heir to Rivera to being the 6th inning guy that no one trusts — it’s time to work harder. That means spending more time worrying about your conditioning. Reporting to camp in the best shape of your life may not change your fortunes and it may not result in a great season but it sure wouldn’t hurt either, if only to insulate you from more criticism for something that is entirely within your control.

      Chamberlain doesn’t have to be skinny to be a stud pitcher in the big leagues. But he has to at least understand that showing up heavier isn’t helping either.

    17. deadrody
      February 27th, 2011 | 11:14 am

      It would be nice if this ridiculous idea were actually true. Did anyone here worrying about Joba being too fat watch the game yesterday ? Not fat. Looked exactly like he did last year and every player loses a decent amount of weight during spring training. I would be Joba goes north to NY lighter than a year ago.

      Much ado about nothing

    18. Corey Italiano
      February 27th, 2011 | 1:07 pm

      I wish he’d get a haircut

    19. MJ Recanati
      February 28th, 2011 | 9:42 am

      deadrody wrote:

      Did anyone here worrying about Joba being too fat watch the game yesterday?

      How people perform in spring training means very little, both in the positive and in the negative.

      deadrody wrote:

      every player loses a decent amount of weight during spring training

      That’s not a good enough excuse for showing up heavier. Professional athletes — especially ones whose place in the game is far from secure — shouldn’t show up to training camp looking to play their way into shape. They should come already in shape, showing evidence that they didn’t spend their winter vacation doing nothing but eating and watching TV.

      Again, no one is saying that Chamberlain can’t perform at a high level, even with the extra weight. But for a guy that got bumped down in the pecking order last year and whose team spent idiotic amounts of money on another setup man, Chamberlain should be working harder to get back in the team’s good graces. Part of that means making an effort to look more like a pro athlete and less like a beer-bellied pig.

    20. Raf
      February 28th, 2011 | 10:12 am

      @ MJ Recanati:
      The thing is, showing up heavier doesn’t necessarily mean that he’s out of shape.

      He still has strong peripherals, I’m not going to give up on him just yet.

    21. MJ Recanati
      February 28th, 2011 | 11:34 am

      Raf wrote:

      The thing is, showing up heavier doesn’t necessarily mean that he’s out of shape.

      You’re not wrong to say that in general but, in this case, I guess I’ll just rephrase it that Cashman wouldn’t have made a point to talk about Chamberlain being “heavier” if he felt that Chamberlain reported to camp in good shape.

      Raf wrote:

      He still has strong peripherals, I’m not going to give up on him just yet.

      We’ll see what his peripherals are in 2011. However, the Yankees have just about given up on him so I don’t think it matters much one way or another.

    22. Raf
      February 28th, 2011 | 1:05 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      However, the Yankees have just about given up on him so I don’t think it matters much one way or another.

      Agreed.

      The way he has been handled has been odd to say the least. The organization may have given up on him, but they never demoted him, or buried him. I still think he can be a serviceable starter, he just needed better conditioning, or more reps in the minors. Even though he had a shoulder injury in TX, and it may have impacted his stuff, I see no reason why he shouldn’t have given starting another go. I would’ve treated 2009 as part of the development process, taking his lumps… Of course, the info I have is limited, the organization would know far more than I, but it still strikes me as odd.

    23. MJ Recanati
      February 28th, 2011 | 3:56 pm

      Raf wrote:

      The way he has been handled has been odd to say the least. The organization may have given up on him, but they never demoted him, or buried him.

      I agree. For as much as I dislike #62, I can’t deny that one of Cashman’s biggest blunders was how the team handled him over the past two seasons.

      Raf wrote:

      he just needed better conditioning

      Haven’t I been saying that throughout this thread? #62 is an out-of-shape pig. You just said so yourself (in far more polite terms).

    24. Raf
      March 1st, 2011 | 10:41 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Haven’t I been saying that throughout this thread? #62 is an out-of-shape pig. You just said so yourself (in far more polite terms).

      That’s part of it. I thought he ran out of gas towards the end of the 2009 season.

      I had a bigger issue with his pitch selection and thought if he learned to pitch, using his curve and change, he would have better results than throwing near 100 pitches in less than 5 innings.

    25. MJ Recanati
      March 1st, 2011 | 10:56 am

      Raf wrote:

      I had a bigger issue with his pitch selection and thought if he learned to pitch, using his curve and change, he would have better results than throwing near 100 pitches in less than 5 innings.

      No argument from me. I said those exact words for all of 2009 and into last year’s off-season.

      Chamberlain used to be a four-pitch starter with plus-plus velocity. He ended up as a two-pitch starter with plus velocity but only average stuff. Somewhere along the line, he stopped using his other pitches and it affected everything else.

    26. Raf
      March 1st, 2011 | 11:43 am

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Chamberlain used to be a four-pitch starter with plus-plus velocity. He ended up as a two-pitch starter with plus velocity but only average stuff. Somewhere along the line, he stopped using his other pitches and it affected everything else.

      It seemed so simple; innings were to be increased in 2010, finally, no more rules. So what happens? He’s put in the pen for an entire year. No competition or anything. The rules were a waste.

      At the very least, they could’ve sent him down to start, refine his other pitches, but that didn’t seem to be an option.

      Oh well, what’s done is done.

    27. MJ Recanati
      March 1st, 2011 | 12:18 pm

      Raf wrote:

      So what happens? He’s put in the pen for an entire year. No competition or anything. The rules were a waste.

      Yep, the rules were a complete waste. That’s Cashman’s (and Girardi’s) biggest mistake in all this.

      While I understand that plans change and that the team never predicted that they’d pull the plug on Chamberlain as a starter down the line, it does seem idiotic that they weren’t willing to keep him in that role in the minors just to see what might happen.

      That being said, Chamberlain has made it easy for the team to marginalize him since he had a very inconsistent 2010 season and doesn’t show anything positive off the field to assume that he’ll ever turn it around.

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