• Tex: Slap Play “Not Baseball”

    Posted by on March 21st, 2011 · Comments (19)

    Via WFAN today:

    Memo from Yankees first baseman Mark Teixeira to Phillies left fielder Ben Francisco: “That’s not baseball.”

    According to Teixeira, Francisco’s effort to knock the ball out his glove on a fourth-inning grounder down the first-base line on Sunday was an unnecessary play.

    “That’s not a hustle play, there is no reason for it,” said Teixeira. “He could hurt me or hurt himself.”

    Francisco engaged contact with Teixeira instead of pulling up to accept an easy out in front of first base. Teixeira was visibly annoyed after the play, shaking his head at the runner.

    “That’s not baseball,” Teixeira said afterward.

    Really? I guess A-Rod missed the memo…

    Comments on Tex: Slap Play “Not Baseball”

    1. munson78
      March 21st, 2011 | 2:30 pm

      Agree 100%. It was a bad play by a-rod then and it still a bad play today!

    2. MJ Recanati
      March 21st, 2011 | 3:05 pm

      Steve Lombardi78 wrote:

      Really? I guess A-Rod missed the memo…

      You know who else missed the memo? Dustin Pedroia.

      http://cache.boston.com/bonzai-fba/Globe_Photo/2007/10/16/1192583121_9092.jpg

      Let’s not get all too sanctimonious about the horrible human being that Alex Rodriguez is. This play has happened before and will happen again. It’s not as if Rodriguez invented it.

    3. March 21st, 2011 | 3:25 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      You know who else missed the memo? Dustin Pedroia.

      Classic deflection.

      Stan: Hey, Joe, did you know that you just shit your pants?
      Joe: Never mind me, look at all those babies in the daycare center, they’ve crapped themselves too, ya know!

    4. MJ Recanati
      March 21st, 2011 | 3:39 pm

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      How is it deflection to point out that Alex Rodriguez is not the only person to have tried to avoid a tag by slapping the ball out of a fielder’s glove?

      I’m not saying Rodriguez didn’t do it, I’m not saying he was right or wrong to do it, I’m just saying he’s not the only one. So, again, if you want to crucify Rodriguez for doing something that his teammate doesn’t consider a clean play, go ahead and put him up on a cross. But Rodriguez will be flanked by Pedroia and Francisco, at the very least, along with all the other players that have attempted this type of play in previous years.

      As with everything else related to Rodriguez, everyone that complains about him lacks the perspective to realize that he’s not the first or last guy to use “black arts” to gain an advantage. If some folks don’t like that sort of thing, that’s fine. To each his own.

      All I know is this: if the umpire hadn’t called Rodriguez out and had let the play stand, I wouldn’t have had one iota of trouble sleeping at night.

    5. Raf
      March 21st, 2011 | 4:01 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      Classic deflection.

      It couldn’t hurt to add context.

      Francisco and Rodriguez (and Pedroia) aren’t the first to attempt the play and chances are they won’t be the last.

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      All I know is this: if the umpire hadn’t called Rodriguez out and had let the play stand, I wouldn’t have had one iota of trouble sleeping at night.

      One of the things that surprised me the most about that series was on several occasions the umpires got together and made or overturned a call. I didn’t remember that ever happening up to that point, other than maybe the Pine Tar Game. There were many controversial calls that had allowed to stand, where the umpires didn’t conference; Reggie Jackson (78 WS), Jeter’s HR (96 ALCS), Ed Armbrister interference(75 WS), Robinson Cano interference (05 ALDS), Clemens’ ejection (90 ALCS), Jorge Orta’s safe call (85 WS), so on and so forth…

      At any rate, Teix needs to calm down, it’s not like he was run over like baserunners often do with catchers and middle infielders. I’d take a Ben Francisco slap attempt over a Hal McCrae rolling bodyblock.

    6. March 21st, 2011 | 4:14 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:

      For the record, I was there, in person, for the A-Rod slap game. And, MJ, you know the seats, so, I had a ring side seat for that one.

      Personally, as a Yankees fan, that was a very, very, frustrating game. I knew, if they lost that game, that they were going to choke up the whole thing in Game 7.

      As far as the A-Rod play, to be candid, at the time, I sort of – STRESS “sort of” – understood what A-Rod was trying for, again, because it was a night full of frustration. But, the way he went about it was, for lack of a better term, so “fem” – it was like an effeminate queer trying to fight off a mugger. I would have been much “happier” (is that the right word?) to have seen A-Rod run over the pitcher (assuming the pitcher was in the baseline) or lower a shoulder into the pitcher as he tried to apply the tag.

      Maybe, as Tex says, that’s not baseball. But, at the least, it’s a little more manly than trying to slap at it, like A-Rod did.

      Again, just IMHO. Doesn’t mean I’m right or anything. Just being honest with my take on the whole thing.

    7. redbug
      March 21st, 2011 | 4:45 pm

      @ Steve Lombardi:

      But, the way he went about it was, for lack of a better term, so “fem” – it was like an effeminate queer trying to fight off a mugger.
      ——————————————————————–

      I didn’t like the play either, Steve. But, getting all homophobic is really unnecessary and it’s offensive.

      I guess you’d be surprised at how many gay men and women you’ve played and worked with. Not many would be comfortable coming out with someone who’s so comfortable labeling someone as “effeminate” or “queer”. It’s been a long time since I can recall hearing or reading that.

    8. March 21st, 2011 | 4:59 pm

      @ redbug:
      I meant no offense. And, I have several gay and lesbian friends. And, for the record, I’ve been with them when they’ve called others a “queen” etc. I meant it in the same way they use it.

    9. Raf
      March 21st, 2011 | 5:13 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      As far as the A-Rod play, to be candid, at the time, I sort of – STRESS “sort of” – understood what A-Rod was trying for

      I understood where he was coming from too. Same with Knoblauch when he had his “braincramp” during the 98 ALCS. Hey, you take a shot. Maybe the umpires call it (George Brett, later overturned), maybe they don’t (AJ Pierzynski, 2005 ALCS). That it took them a while to get the call right, tells me that there really wasn’t anything hard and fast about the rules being called. In the Brett example the Scooter-White argument that ensued during the brouhaha definitely showed that the call wasn’t made consistently.

    10. Raf
      March 21st, 2011 | 5:19 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      I would have been much “happier” (is that the right word?) to have seen A-Rod run over the pitcher (assuming the pitcher was in the baseline) or lower a shoulder into the pitcher as he tried to apply the tag.

      That would’ve started a fight, I’m sure.

      The thing to do probably would’ve been what Joey Cora did in the 95 ALDS, try and slide away from the tag. But I have no problem with gamesmanship in baseball. That’s just the way the game is played. Always has been. Every little advantage helps. It could have been interpreted as Arroyo not having control of the ball.

    11. 77yankees
      March 21st, 2011 | 7:54 pm

      I recall seeing Dave Winfield, on a play he was going to be out by ten feet at home plate in Detroit, reach out and pull the catcher’s mitt off Lance Parrish to score a run that stood.

      Are plays like A-Rod’s & Francisco’s a violation of the unwritten players “code”? More than likely, but what’s the difference between doing it to a catcher with the ball at home plate to score a run and doing it at 1st base?

    12. munson78
      March 21st, 2011 | 9:25 pm

      I did not like the A-rod play but looking back I remember a game when Bobby Murcer put a ball that was not caught into an OF glove and signaled that it was caught! Great memories!

    13. YankCrank
      March 21st, 2011 | 9:26 pm

      77yankees wrote:

      Are plays like A-Rod’s & Francisco’s a violation of the unwritten players “code”? More than likely, but what’s the difference between doing it to a catcher with the ball at home plate to score a run and doing it at 1st base?

      No difference, unless your name is Alex Rodriguez.

    14. Evan3457
      March 22nd, 2011 | 4:17 pm

      Trying to win a playoff game…the Yanks struggling to score?

      Too bad. The umps say it’s illegal, so it’s illegal. A-Rod tried to win a lost situation.

      If it works, you’re a hero; if it doesn’t, you’re a bum.

    15. redbug
      March 22nd, 2011 | 5:25 pm

      @ Steve Lombardi:

      for the record, I’ve been with them when they’ve called others a “queen” etc. I meant it in the same way they use it
      ==================================================================

      Steve, you wouldn’t be comfortable using the “N” word because you’ve heard some of your black friends use it. It’s the same thing. Plus, your language was much stonger and more offensive than the word “queen”.

      I guess my point is, I don’t come here to read negative, biased words about any group of people. This isn’t the first time I’ve read homophobic words here. It seems like that’s the one group left it’s OK to make fun of. I’d like this to be the end of it.

    16. agsf
      March 22nd, 2011 | 6:57 pm

      LOL Arod.

      “I meant no offense. And, I have several gay and lesbian friends.
      Ah come’n. After every comedian in the world making fun of the “I’m not racist, I have black friends”, it’s hard to believe you’d pull that out.

      I’m not going to get into whether your statement was wrong or not, but it makes absolutely no difference if you have gay friends or not.

    17. March 24th, 2011 | 11:02 am

      I was at the slap play game in person. Yankee fans cheered the play at the time, and were so angry when it was overturned that some of them threw garbage on the field. I remember Bob Sheppard had to make an announcement to stop throwing stuff on the field. And how a swarm of police ringed the field. I don’t remember anybody at the time during the game debating whether the play was effeminate or any other perjorative you can throw at it.

      This was the second time in the game that the umpires overruled something in the game (remember that Bellhorn’s homer was first called a double.) Without the benefit of replay angles and replays at the game, it just looked at the time like the umps were taking the Sox’s side. Those details are all forgotten, though, whenever talking about the slap play.

    18. MJ Recanati
      March 24th, 2011 | 12:19 pm

      lisaswan wrote:

      I was at the slap play game in person. Yankee fans cheered the play at the time, and were so angry when it was overturned that some of them threw garbage on the field. I remember Bob Sheppard had to make an announcement to stop throwing stuff on the field. And how a swarm of police ringed the field. I don’t remember anybody at the time during the game debating whether the play was effeminate or any other perjorative you can throw at it.

      That’s all anyone needs to know. Yankee fans’ first visceral reactions to the play were to cheer and to react angrily when the ruling was overturned. Everything else is hand-wringing baloney.

    19. Raf
      March 24th, 2011 | 12:55 pm

      lisaswan wrote:

      This was the second time in the game that the umpires overruled something in the game (remember that Bellhorn’s homer was first called a double.)

      I remember that too. I was like a little stunned when the umpires called it a 2b. The ball was clearly out, so I thought. Just added to the loopiness that happened that series. Even after the slap tag, I was wondering ‘why is it now that they decide to work on getting the calls right?’ It was a little frustrating a year later, when Joe West made himself a factor in the ALDS against the Angels.

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