• When Did Yankee Stadium Move To Los Angeles?

    Posted by on April 30th, 2011 · Comments (10)

    This the first pitch of the Yankees game of April 29, 2011.
    Click on the thumbnail to enlarge the photo.
    Where is everyone?

    First Pitch Yankee Stadium April 29, 2011

    Old Righties Giving Yanks Innings To Start A Season In The Steinbrenner Era

    Posted by on April 29th, 2011 · Comments (4)

    Since 1973, here are the right-handed starters, age 36 or older, to give the Yankees games of 6+ IP within the team’s first 23 games of a season:

    Rk Player #Matching   W L ERA IP SO WHIP
    1 Roger Clemens 22 Ind. Games 12 2 3.07 149.2 138 1.20
    2 Mike Mussina 10 Ind. Games 6 2 2.77 65.0 47 1.11
    3 Phil Niekro 9 Ind. Games 7 1 2.31 66.1 52 1.22
    4 Kevin Brown 9 Ind. Games 4 3 3.97 59.0 36 1.29
    5 David Cone 6 Ind. Games 4 0 0.86 41.2 29 0.82
    6 Joe Niekro 5 Ind. Games 4 0 1.65 32.2 17 1.07
    7 Orlando Hernandez 4 Ind. Games 3 1 1.24 29.0 30 0.93
    8 Luis Tiant 2 Ind. Games 1 1 4.85 13.0 7 1.46
    9 Bartolo Colon 2 Ind. Games 2 0 1.84 14.2 13 1.02
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 4/29/2011.

    .

    Freddy Garcia tries to join the club tonight.

    The Bartolo Colon & Freddy Garcia Pipe Dream

    Posted by on April 29th, 2011 · Comments (37)

    Freddy Garcia is 36-years old and Bartolo Colon is 38-years old. How many times in Yankees history have they had two RHP age 36 or older each make 20+ starts for them in the same season? Only three times:

    Roger Clemens and David Cone in 1999 and 2000. (And, Cone was terrible in 2000 and should not have been in the rotation.) And, Roger Clemens and El Duque Hernandez in 2002.

    How many times in Yankees history have they had two RHP age 36 or older each make 25+ starts for them in the same season?

    Just Clemens and Cone in 1999 and 2000.

    How many times in Yankees history have they had two RHP age 36 or older each make 30+ starts for them in the same season?

    Just Clemens and Cone in 1999.

    By the end of July, either Colon or Garcia, or maybe both of them, are going to crash due to injury or the league catching up to them. It may happen sooner. Enjoy what you’re getting out of them now – and they have thrown well to date – but, it’s not going to last – not for both of them…for the whole season.

    Hang Time

    Posted by on April 28th, 2011 · Comments (4)

    This was interesting.

    Although, I suspect, that there are outfielders who need less hang time to catch up with balls than others.

    For Swisher 2011 Starts Out Like 2008

    Posted by on April 28th, 2011 · Comments (11)

    Nick Swisher’s first 21 games of 2008: BA/OBA/SLG line of .232/.393/.333 in 89 PA.
    Nick Swisher’s first 21 games of 2011: BA/OBA/SLG line of .208/.326/.236 in 89 PA.

    By most accounts, 2008 was the worst season of Swisher’s career. Is he going to repeat that and have a bad year in 2011? What do you think?

    The Baseball Same Game

    Posted by on April 28th, 2011 · Comments (0)

    Six years ago today, my book was published.

    I’ve been writing about baseball publically since 1997.  That’s a long time.  And, very often, today, I look back at things that I’ve written in the past and think “Good grief, I wish I knew what I know now, back in 1999, because I never would have written that!” or “I look like an idiot for writing that back when I did!”

    However, I am still proud of my book.  Sure, there may be a few things that I would change, add or remove from it, today, if I were doing it over.  But, as it stands. I still believe that it’s an entertaining read and a fun, thought-provoking, offering that most baseball fans would enjoy.

    How Jeter Met A-Rod

    Posted by on April 28th, 2011 · Comments (0)

    Via Ian O’Connor’s new book on Jeter -

    Alex Rodriguez was not just humiliated by his own steroid confessions; he was a physical wreck going into his March 2009 surgery to repair a torn labrum in his right hip. He feared his career might be over, or at least permanently impaired.

    “I’d hit rock bottom,” A-Rod would say.

    Around the same time, Details magazine published a piece on Rodriguez that included a photo showing A-Rod in a muscle shirt, kissing his own reflection in the mirror. So after Rodriguez rehabbed from surgery, and before he rejoined the team in early May, A-Rod would be dragged to a Tampa diner, Mom’s Place, by two people close to him — Yankees PR man Jason Zillo and longtime friend Gui Socarras.

    Rodriguez had surrounded himself with an ever-growing circle of advisers and crisis counselors, including Madonna’s manager, Guy Oseary, John McCain’s strategist, Ben Porritt, PR man Richard Rubenstein, and, of course, Scott Boras. But none of these suits had the nerve to piece together an intervention quite like this: Zillo and Socarras shouted down A-Rod over 90 minutes, ordering him to shed his self-serving skin for keeps.

    “I’m glad I had two friends that were very honest with me,” Rodriguez said of the ambush.

    Two days after this breakfast meeting, A-Rod hit the first post-surgical pitch he saw for a three-run homer in Baltimore. Of greater consequence, he maintained a relatively humble demeanor over the course of the season and, in his words, “divorced myself from any personal achievements.”

    Rodriguez would say he had spent more time with his teammates off the field — at dinners and backyard barbecues — than he had in his first five Yankee years combined. Although A-Rod did not say so publicly, it was obvious Derek Jeter had embraced him as never before.

    For one, Jeter had given up trying to understand why A-Rod could not be more like him. For two, Jeter realized an emasculated A-Rod was someone worth giving another shot.

    The captain saw A-Rod was making a legitimate attempt to curb his high-maintenance ways. More often than in the past, Jeter was seen engaging Rodriguez in small talk in the clubhouse, in the dugout, around the batting cage. They acted less like business partners with competing agendas and more like teammates with a common goal.

    …Jeter realized an emasculated A-Rod was someone worth giving another shot…

    The centaur is a gelding? Wow. You learn something new everyday!

    Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    Posted by on April 27th, 2011 · Comments (13)

    Everything you ever wanted to know about it, via the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -

    What is Thoracic Outlet Syndrome?

     TOS is an umbrella term that encompasses three related syndromes that cause pain in the arm, shoulder, and neck:  neurogenic TOS (caused by compression of the brachial plexus), vascular TOS (caused by compression of the subclavian artery or vein) and nonspecific or disputed TOS (in which the pain is from unexplained causes).  Occasionally, neurogenic TOS and vascular TOS co-exist in the same person.  Most doctors agree that TOS is caused by compression of the brachial plexus or subclavian vessels as they pass through narrow passageways leading from the base of the neck to the armpit and arm, but there is considerable disagreement about its diagnosis and treatment.

    Making the diagnosis of TOS even more difficult is that a number of disorders feature symptoms similar to those of TOS, including rotator cuff injuries, cervical disc disorders, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, complex regional pain syndrome, and tumors of the syrinx or spinal cord.  The disorder can sometimes be diagnosed in a physical exam by tenderness in the supraclavicular area, weakness and/or a “pins and needles” feeling when elevating the hands, weakness in the fifth (“little”) finger, and paleness in the palm of one or both hands when the individual raises them above the shoulders, with the fingers pointing to the ceiling.  Symptoms of TOS vary depending on the type.

               Neurogenic TOS has a characteristic sign, called the Gilliatt-Sumner hand, in which there is severe wasting in the fleshy base of the thumb.  There may be numbness along the underside of the hand and forearm, or dull aching pain in the neck, shoulder, and armpit. 

              Vascular TOS features pallor, a weak or absent pulse in the affected arm, which also may be cool to the touch and appear paler than the unaffected arm.  Symptoms may include numbness, tingling, aching, and heaviness. 

               Non-specific TOS  most prominently features a dull, aching pain in the neck, shoulder, and armpit that gets worse with activity.  Non-specific TOS is frequently triggered by a traumatic event such as a car accident or a work related injury.  It also occurs in athletes, including weight lifters, swimmers, tennis players, and baseball pitchers. 

    TOS is more common in women.  The onset of symptoms usually occurs between 20 and 50 years of age.  Doctors usually recommend nerve conduction studies, electromyography, or imaging studies to confirm or rule out a diagnosis of TOS.

    Is there any treatment?

     Treatment begins with exercise programs and physical therapy to strengthen chest muscles, restore normal posture, and relieve compression by increasing the space of the area the nerve passes through.   Doctors will often prescribe non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (such as naproxen or ibuprofen) for pain.  If this doesn’t relieve pain, a doctor may recommend thoracic outlet decompression surgery to release or remove the structures causing compression of the nerve or artery.

    What is the prognosis?

     The outcome for individuals with TOS varies according to type. The majority of individuals with TOS will improve with exercise and physical therapy.  Vascular TOS, and true neurogenic TOS often require surgery to relieve pressure on the affected vessel or nerve. 

    If this is what Phil Hughes has, hopefully he’s feeling better soon.

    Yanks Leak Personal Info On Season Ticket Holders

    Posted by on April 27th, 2011 · Comments (23)

    I really hope the MSM picks up this story and the Yankees get nailed to a cross for it.

    Jose Bautista

    Posted by on April 27th, 2011 · Comments (3)

    The numbers are scary.

    Almost Glenallen Hill 2000 Yankees scary.

    Something has to be up, no?

    Charlie Hudson’s Yankees Debut

    Posted by on April 27th, 2011 · Comments (2)

    Sum’ ballgame, huh?

    Yankees: Thank You O’s

    Posted by on April 27th, 2011 · Comments (25)

    Good news – the Yankees are 12-8 and in first place in the A.L. East.

    Bad news – the Yankees are 4-0 this season against Baltimore and 8-8 when they play someone other than the O’s.

    Now, at that rate, the Yankees will still be a 90-win team in 2011. But, anyone who thinks the Yankees are going to win 95-100 games this season, based on their 12-8 record to date, is fooling themselves.

    Own This Blog

    Posted by on April 27th, 2011 · Comments (5)

    No, I’m not giving it away. And, I’m not selling it. But, I’d be willing to consider a trade – this blog in exchange for a wallet made of Chupacabra leather. If you’re interested, let me know.

    Rafael Soriano

    Posted by on April 26th, 2011 · Comments (15)

    It’s how you say Kyle Farnsworth in Spanish.

    Brent Lillibridge Slays Yankees

    Posted by on April 26th, 2011 · Comments (2)

    Putting your Yankees fan cap aside for a minute, as a baseball fan, how can you not tip your cap and applaud the two plays like the ones that Lillibridge made, on back-to-back batters, to end the Yankees game this evening?

    By the way, in 2008, Lillibridge was traded by the Atlanta Braves with Jon Gilmore, Santos Rodriguez and Tyler Flowers to the Chicago White Sox for Boone Logan and Javier Vazquez. One year later, Logan and Vazquez were traded by the Braves to the New York Yankees for Arodys Vizcaino, Melky Cabrera, Michael Dunn and cash. So, in a way, the Yankees gave up Vizcaino, Melky, Dunn and cash in order to put Lillibridge in position to beat them in 2011. It makes sense if you don’t think about it.

    Lastly, ouch, it’s too bad the Yankees don’t get to hit off Orioles pitching all the time, huh?  Throw some good pitching at them and this line-up flops like Kirstie Alley’s pooch.

    Happy Birthday Ray Caldwell

    Posted by on April 26th, 2011 · Comments (0)

    Real wild child had lots of baseball skill.

    Not even a bolt of lightning could knock him out of a game.

    Bullpen Diaries: Mariano Rivera, Bronx Dreams, Pinstripe Legends, And The Future Of The New York Yankees

    Posted by on April 26th, 2011 · Comments (0)

    It’s a new book coming out today.

    That’s all I know about it.

    A.J. Burnett Is Off To A Great Start

    Posted by on April 26th, 2011 · Comments (2)

    Have you seen the numbers on Burnett?

    Over his first 11 starts, he’s thrown 71.3 IP with an ERA of 3.28, facing 303 batters – 53 of which he has whiffed. And, his record over these games is 6-2. Related, the Yankees have won 8 of these 11 games.

    Oh, wait, that was his start to the season last year. And, he ended up going 10-15 with an ERA of 5.26 in 33 starts (in 2010).

    Think about that before you get too excited over how A.J. Burnett has thrown over his first five starts of 2011.

    Hughes Going To See A Doctor

    Posted by on April 25th, 2011 · Comments (7)

    Per Jim Baumbach:

    Phil Hughes’ bullpen session did not go well, Joe Girardi said, and he’s headed to see the team doctor.

    I would not be surprised if the doc says there’s nothing wrong with you – outside of being a dough boy.  But, I could be wrong.

    Wilson Betemit

    Posted by on April 25th, 2011 · Comments (15)

    How soon before we have to start calling him Lil’ Papi?

    Royal Blue sure does agree with him.

    Since joining K.C., his BA/OBA/SLG line, to date, is: .308/.386/.511 in 381 PA.

    The Grandbimo

    Posted by on April 25th, 2011 · Comments (4)

    Most HR in baseball since Auust 12, 2010:

    Player			G	AB	HR
    Jose	Bautista	 	67	236	26
    Troy	Tulowitzki	67	257	24
    Albert	Pujols		68	252	21
    Curtis	Granderson	59	230	21
    Jay	Bruce		47	182	17
    David	Wright		67	254	17
    Alex	Rodriguez		44	164	17
    Miguel	Cabrera		61	221	17
    Paul	Konerko		62	237	16
    Ryan	Braun		66	253	16
    Matt	Kemp		65	253	15
    Pat	Burrell		63	202	15
    Jayson	Werth		63	241	14
    Ryan	Raburn		56	247	14
    Adrian	Beltre		64	243	14
    Buster	Posey		63	245	14
    Mike	Napoli		45	155	13
    Mike	Stanton		59	219	13
    Joey	Votto		63	228	13
    Hunter	Pence		70	278	13
    Mark	Teixeira		64	238	13
    Jim	Thome		42	134	12
    Drew	Stubbs		62	239	12
    Dan	Uggla		70	266	12
    Russell	Branyan		38	149	12
    Pablo	Sandoval		55	206	12
    Nelson	Cruz		52	200	12
    Jorge	Posada		49	179	12
    Carlos	Lee		71	274	12
    Robbien	Cano		66	268	12
    Jed	Lowrie		44	177	12
    Kelly	Johnson		61	248	12
    Victor	Martinez		61	242	12

    Is Curtis Granderson the best slugging Yankees CF since Bobby Murcer?

    The Jeter Meter Not Jumping Much

    Posted by on April 25th, 2011 · Comments (32)

    In his last 113 games, from June 15, 2010 through April 24, 2011, Derek Jeter’s BA/OBA/SLG line is: .254/.334/.315

    Over this span, he has just 2 homeruns and 22 XBH, in total, over 464 At Bats.

    At this point, he’s not getting on base often enough to bat at the top of the line-up and he’s showing zero pop (and has no business batting in the heart of the line-up.)

    If  Jeter keeps this pace over his next 40 games, Girardi has to start batting him 8th, no?

    Hot Yankees Starts In The Steinbrenner Era

    Posted by on April 25th, 2011 · Comments (0)

    The Yankees have won 12 of their first 18 games this season. Since 1973, how many times have they won 12+ of their first 18 games? Here’s the answer:

    .
    Since 1973, prior to this season, they’ve done it 11 times.  Interesting that 1998, 1999 and 2000 were the only times they did it and then went on to win the World Series.  But, then again, that 1998-2000 squad was a special team.

    In any event, anything is better than their start in 2005 where they lost 11 of their first 18.  Or, 1985 and 1991, where they lost 12 of their first 18.

    New Jeter Bio Highlights Riff With A-Rod

    Posted by on April 24th, 2011 · Comments (43)

    Via the Post -

    It was a true bromance — until it went foul.

    Frenemies Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez have spent the past decade taking swings at each other, according to a new unauthorized Jeter biography that shows the splintered relationship was nastier than ever reported and that Bombers brass thought it threatened to fracture the team — and even cost the Yankees money.

    “The Captain,” by sportswriter Ian O’Connor, out next month, chronicles the bond between the Yankee stars — a soap-opera saga filled with power and betrayal — from their days as rookies playing for different teams but as close as brothers, to their icy co-existence in The Bronx.

    Jeter’s unyielding insistence on loyalty and his dislike for A-Rod during the third baseman’s early years in pinstripes was so legendary that one Yankee official admitted he was too scared to talk to Jeter about making amends with his teammate.

    “It would’ve been the last conversation I ever had with Derek,” the official said. “I would’ve been dead to him. It would’ve been like approaching Joe DiMaggio to talk to him about Marilyn Monroe.”

    Don Mattingly, then the hitting coach and former captain, tried to intervene, citing his own unfriendly history with teammate Wade Boggs. “I faked it with Boggs,” he told Jeter. “And you have to fake it with Alex.”

    So it was understandable that Jeter was less than thrilled when the Bombers traded for his foe before the 2004 season.

    Clubhouse sniping came quickly. An unnamed player described the new arrival as “very phony,” the book says. A-Rod would ignore stadium employees and seemed oblivious to fans, even sick young kids, who clamored for his autograph. Jeter, who prized poise and selflessness, dismissed A-Rod and his diva-like behavior.

    And when fans and rival players criticized A-Rod, Jeter deferred instead of defending his teammate.

    General Manager Brian Cashman noticed this and asked Jeter to “fake it” with A-Rod.

    “You’ve got to lead them all, the ones you like and the ones you don’t,” he told him. He asked him to appeal to Yankee fans on A-Rod’s behalf.

    “I can’t tell the fans what to do,” Jeter countered.

    A-Rod’s obsession with Jeter continued, the book says. He constantly asked players and team officials about Jeter — down to which charity he was currently supporting.

    It all came to a head during a Yankee loss in August 2006 to Baltimore.

    An easy pop-up hung in the air between A-Rod and Jeter. Both players closed in and Jeter bumped into A-Rod, knocking the ball out of his glove. Jeter shot A-Rod a withering look.

    The gesture did not go unnoticed. Cashman pulled Jeter aside and ordered him to knock it off.

    “Listen, this has to stop,” Cashman said. “Everybody in the press box, every team official, everyone watching, they saw you look at the ball on the ground and look at him with disgust like you were saying, ‘That’s your mess, you clean it up.’ ”

    A-Rod also felt betrayed by manager Joe Torre, who players said added fuel to the fiery feud.

    “He would never call Jeter on anything, but he’d have no problem doing it to Alex,” one player told the author.

    Things didn’t gel until A-Rod hit rock bottom in 2009. He had been “emasculated,” outed as a steroid user and an unfaithful husband the year before.

    Jeter began engaging in small talk with the third baseman in the clubhouse and he and girlfriend Minka Kelly even dined with A-Rod and his then-flame Kate Hudson, where they all seemed to enjoy each other’s company, the author says.

    I swear that I once saw this same exact love-hate-love story arc played out in an episode of Love American Style starring Jack Cassidy and Stefanie Powers…

    MLB PED Policy Pushing Players Towards Creatine?

    Posted by on April 24th, 2011 · Comments (7)

    Via the Daily News -

    Hamstring pulls and ACL tears suddenly seem so old-fashioned, so outdated, as irrelevant as carbon paper, eight-track tapes and Friendster. Nearly one month into the 2011 season, oblique muscle injuries have emerged as Major League Baseball’s trendiest ailment.

    More than a dozen players have been sidelined with oblique injuries this season. Yankee star Alex Rodriguez sat out two games last week with a minor oblique injury. His teammate, Curtis Granderson, injured his oblique during spring training. Jason Bay finally returned to the Mets on Thursday after spending the first three weeks of the season on the disabled list with a strained left rib cage. That same day Angel Pagan left the Mets’ game against Houston in the fifth inning after tweaking his oblique while facing Astros pitcher J.A. Happ – who has also missed part of this season with an oblique problem.

    “It’s never a career-ending injury but it can be really debilitating,” says former professional baseball player Dan Rootenberg, president of New York-based SPEAR Physical Therapy. “You can’t sneeze, cough, laugh or move without extreme pain.”

    So why the sudden surge in injuries to obliques, those broad, flat muscles that attach the rib cage and the pelvis? Why are so many ballplayers sitting out with sharp pains in their sides?

    Sports physician Lewis Maharam, the former president of the New York chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, says the rise in oblique injuries may be a byproduct of the drug-testing program that MLB and the Players Association first agreed to implement in 2002.

    “My theory is that drug testing in Major League Baseball is working and people are getting away from using illegal steroids,” Maharam says. “They are moving to legal products such as creatine, but they don’t know how to use it in conjunction with their workouts.”

    Creatine, a legal dietary supplement that is not banned by MLB, NFL, NBA or NCAA, is an amino acid that boosts lean muscle mass and strength. Studies show it’s effective for sports like baseball, tennis and golf, activities that require intense but brief bursts of energy, and not so effective for sports that require endurance, such as running and soccer.

    Creatine, according to Maharam, adds water molecules to muscle fibers, which causes the fibers to separate.

    “This makes for easier muscle tears and slows the repair process, leaving them on injured reserve longer,” Maharam says. “It is because of these side effects that professionals for a long time went away from creatine when they could use anabolics and HGH. Now that testing is stronger, I have seen a trend back toward the safer creatine.”

    Hey, if it’s legal, there’s nothing that can be done about it. And, if players are using it, then they should make sure that they drink lots of water with it.

    ’11 Yanks Powering Ball Like ’00 Cards & ’09 Rangers

    Posted by on April 24th, 2011 · Comments (1)

    Really, it’s true.

    Now I Know Why Kei Igawa Was A Stud In Japan

    Posted by on April 23rd, 2011 · Comments (0)

    Before Colon, Garcia, Millwood & Silva

    Posted by on April 23rd, 2011 · Comments (2)

    These guys once pitched for the Yankees too:

    .

    See any of your old favs here?

    Most Quality Starts For The Yankees Since 1919

    Posted by on April 23rd, 2011 · Comments (2)

    It’s an interesting list. Here’s the Top 50:

    Rk Player #Matching   W L W-L% GS
    1 Whitey Ford 282 Ind. Games 201 39 .838 282
    2 Mel Stottlemyre 247 Ind. Games 151 64 .702 247
    3 Andy Pettitte 225 Ind. Games 161 27 .856 225
    4 Red Ruffing 210 Ind. Games 171 30 .851 210
    5 Ron Guidry 195 Ind. Games 136 23 .855 195
    6 Lefty Gomez 193 Ind. Games 148 33 .818 193
    7 Fritz Peterson 169 Ind. Games 90 49 .647 169
    8 Waite Hoyt 150 Ind. Games 113 26 .813 150
    9 Mike Mussina 147 Ind. Games 100 19 .840 147
    10 Herb Pennock 143 Ind. Games 105 34 .755 143
    11 Eddie Lopat 125 Ind. Games 95 18 .841 125
    12 Tommy John 125 Ind. Games 86 20 .811 125
    13 Spud Chandler 123 Ind. Games 87 19 .821 123
    14 Bob Shawkey 122 Ind. Games 85 28 .752 122
    15 Vic Raschi 122 Ind. Games 93 18 .838 122
    16 Allie Reynolds 118 Ind. Games 95 14 .872 118
    17 Roger Clemens 105 Ind. Games 70 8 .897 105
    18 Al Downing 104 Ind. Games 60 19 .759 104
    19 Bob Turley 98 Ind. Games 68 15 .819 98
    20 Ralph Terry 94 Ind. Games 57 24 .704 94
    21 Tiny Bonham 92 Ind. Games 64 18 .780 92
    22 Stan Bahnsen 91 Ind. Games 49 25 .662 91
    23 George Pipgras 87 Ind. Games 69 12 .852 87
    24 David Cone 83 Ind. Games 53 12 .815 83
    25 Catfish Hunter 78 Ind. Games 53 20 .726 78
    26 Orlando Hernandez 78 Ind. Games 53 9 .855 78
    27 Carl Mays 76 Ind. Games 57 18 .760 76
    28 Jim Bouton 73 Ind. Games 37 22 .627 73
    29 Ed Figueroa 72 Ind. Games 51 14 .785 72
    30 David Wells 70 Ind. Games 55 5 .917 70
    31 Atley Donald 66 Ind. Games 52 7 .881 66
    32 Hank Borowy 65 Ind. Games 49 13 .790 65
    33 Sad Sam Jones 63 Ind. Games 47 10 .825 63
    34 Doc Medich 62 Ind. Games 42 12 .778 62
    35 Rudy May 62 Ind. Games 38 17 .691 62
    36 Monte Pearson 60 Ind. Games 48 7 .873 60
    37 Chien-Ming Wang 59 Ind. Games 46 5 .902 59
    38 Steve Kline 58 Ind. Games 35 13 .729 58
    39 Jimmy Key 58 Ind. Games 39 4 .907 58
    40 Tommy Byrne 58 Ind. Games 46 7 .868 58
    41 Bill Stafford 57 Ind. Games 30 11 .732 57
    42 Urban Shocker 56 Ind. Games 38 13 .745 56
    43 Marius Russo 55 Ind. Games 38 14 .731 55
    44 Melido Perez 54 Ind. Games 26 14 .650 54
    45 Art Ditmar 53 Ind. Games 32 11 .744 53
    46 Bullet Joe Bush 51 Ind. Games 42 9 .824 51
    47 Bill Bevens 51 Ind. Games 36 13 .735 51
    48 Dave Righetti 50 Ind. Games 30 9 .769 50
    49 CC Sabathia 49 Ind. Games 38 3 .927 49
    50 Pat Dobson 48 Ind. Games 32 11 .744 48
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 4/23/2011.

    .
    Note what happens when you take the Top 50 and sort them by Winning Percentage in those games where they had a Quality Start:

    Rk Player #Matching   W L W-L% 6 GS
    1 CC Sabathia 49 Ind. Games 38 3 .927 49
    2 David Wells 70 Ind. Games 55 5 .917 70
    3 Jimmy Key 58 Ind. Games 39 4 .907 58
    4 Chien-Ming Wang 59 Ind. Games 46 5 .902 59
    5 Roger Clemens 105 Ind. Games 70 8 .897 105
    6 Atley Donald 66 Ind. Games 52 7 .881 66
    7 Monte Pearson 60 Ind. Games 48 7 .873 60
    8 Allie Reynolds 118 Ind. Games 95 14 .872 118
    9 Tommy Byrne 58 Ind. Games 46 7 .868 58
    10 Andy Pettitte 225 Ind. Games 161 27 .856 225
    11 Ron Guidry 195 Ind. Games 136 23 .855 195
    12 Orlando Hernandez 78 Ind. Games 53 9 .855 78
    13 George Pipgras 87 Ind. Games 69 12 .852 87
    14 Red Ruffing 210 Ind. Games 171 30 .851 210
    15 Eddie Lopat 125 Ind. Games 95 18 .841 125
    16 Mike Mussina 147 Ind. Games 100 19 .840 147
    17 Whitey Ford 282 Ind. Games 201 39 .838 282
    18 Vic Raschi 122 Ind. Games 93 18 .838 122
    19 Sad Sam Jones 63 Ind. Games 47 10 .825 63
    20 Bullet Joe Bush 51 Ind. Games 42 9 .824 51
    21 Spud Chandler 123 Ind. Games 87 19 .821 123
    22 Bob Turley 98 Ind. Games 68 15 .819 98
    23 Lefty Gomez 193 Ind. Games 148 33 .818 193
    24 David Cone 83 Ind. Games 53 12 .815 83
    25 Waite Hoyt 150 Ind. Games 113 26 .813 150
    26 Tommy John 125 Ind. Games 86 20 .811 125
    Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
    Generated 4/23/2011.

    .

    CC Sabathia almost always gets a win when he throws a Quality Start for the Yankees. And, he’s only been tagged with an “L” in a “QS” three times as a Yankee. Amazing.

    It’s Never Good To Get Pull Happy At Yankee Stadium

    Posted by on April 23rd, 2011 · Comments (0)

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