• Mariano Rivera’s Blown Save

    Posted by on April 20th, 2011 · Comments (22)

    Well, you don’t see that everyday.

    Just 68 times in the regular season over the last 17 years, in fact:

    Rk             Date Opp    Rslt   AppDec  IP H R ER BB SO HR IR IS BF
    1        2011-04-19 TOR   L 5-6   9-9 BS 1.0 4 2  2  1  0  0  0  0  7
    2        2010-09-26 BOS   W 4-3   8-9 BS 1.1 2 2  2  0  0  0  2  0  6
    3        2010-09-19 BAL   L 3-4   9-9 BS 1.0 2 1  1  0  1  1  0  0  5
    4        2010-09-11 TEX   L 6-7  9-9f BL 0.1 2 2  2  2  0  0  0  0  6
    5        2010-07-04 TOR   W 7-6   9-9 BS 1.0 3 1  1  0  1  0  0  0  6
    6        2010-05-16 MIN   L 3-6   8-8 BS 0.1 1 2  2  1  1  1  3  3  3
    7        2009-09-18 SEA   L 2-3  9-9f BL 0.2 2 2  2  0  2  1  0  0  4
    8        2009-04-24 BOS   L 4-5   8-9 BS 1.1 4 2  2  0  3  1  1  0  8
    9        2008-08-12 MIN   W 9-6   8-9 BS 1.2 2 1  1  0  0  1  2  2  7
    10       2007-09-28 BAL  L 9-10   9-9 BS 1.0 3 3  3  0  0  0  0  0  7
    11       2007-08-13 BAL   W 7-6  9-9f BW 1.0 3 1  1  0  0  0  0  0  5
    12       2007-04-20 BOS   L 6-7  8-8f BL 0.2 3 2  2  0  1  0  2  2  4
    13       2007-04-15 OAK   L 4-5  9-9f BL 0.2 2 3  3  1  0  1  0  0  5
    14       2006-08-08 CHW   L 5-6   9-9 BS 1.0 2 1  1  0  0  1  0  0  4
    15       2006-06-17 WSN  L 9-11  8-8f BL 0.2 2 2  2  1  0  0  1  1  4
    16       2006-04-15 MIN   L 5-6  8-9f BL 1.1 3 2  2  0  2  0  1  0  6
    17       2005-08-16 TBD   L 3-4  9-10 BS 2.0 2 1  1  0  3  1  0  0  7
    18       2005-08-13 TEX   W 7-5  9-10 BS 2.0 5 2  2  0  2  0  0  0 12
    19       2005-04-06 BOS   L 3-7   9-9 BL 0.2 3 5  1  3  1  0  0  0  9
    20       2005-04-05 BOS   W 4-3  9-9f BW 1.0 2 1  1  0  2  1  0  0  5
    21       2004-09-17 BOS   L 2-3  9-9f BL 1.0 2 2  2  1  2  0  0  0  7
    22       2004-07-26 TOR   W 6-5  9-10fBW 2.0 3 2  2  0  2  0  0  0  9
    23       2004-07-24 BOS L 10-11  8-9f BL 0.2 3 3  3  0  0  1  1  0  5
    24       2004-05-11 ANA   W 8-7   9-9 BS 1.0 3 2  2  0  1  1  0  0  5
    25       2003-08-16 BAL   W 5-4   9-9 BS 1.0 1 1  1  0  1  1  0  0  4
    26       2003-08-06 TEX   L 4-5  9-9f BL 1.0 1 2  1  2  0  0  0  0  7
    27       2003-08-03 OAK   L 1-2  9-9f BL 0.1 2 1  1  0  1  0  1  1  3
    28       2003-08-01 OAK   L 2-3   8-9 BS 1.1 2 0  0  0  1  0  2  1  7
    29       2003-07-25 BOS   W 4-3  8-9f BW 1.1 2 0  0  1  2  0  2  1  7
    30       2003-05-28 BOS   W 6-5  9-9f BW 1.0 5 2  2  0  0  0  2  2  7
    31       2002-07-14 CLE  L 7-10  9-9f BL 0.2 5 6  6  1  1  1  0  0  8
    32       2002-07-12 CLE   L 1-2   8-9 BS 1.1 1 0  0  2  1  0  2  1  7
    33       2002-04-19 TOR   W 6-5  8-9f BW 1.1 1 1  1  1  0  0  2  0  6
    34       2002-04-13 BOS   L 6-7  8-8f BL 0.2 1 1  1  0  0  1  2  2  3
    35       2001-09-21 BAL   L 6-7  9-9f BL 0.1 3 2  2  0  0  0  0  0  4
    36       2001-08-26 ANA   L 6-7   8-9 BS 1.1 3 1  1  0  0  0  1  1  7
    37       2001-08-04 ANA   W 5-4  8-9f BW 1.2 1 1  1  0  1  1  1  1  6
    38       2001-07-14 FLA   W 5-4   8-9 BW 1.2 2 0  0  1  2  0  1  1  8
    39       2001-06-12 MON   L 1-2   8-9 BS 1.1 1 1  1  0  1  1  2  0  5
    40       2001-06-04 BOS   W 7-6  8-9f BW 2.0 3 2  2  0  2  1  2  0  9
    41       2001-04-13 BOS   L 2-3 10-10fBL 0.2 3 2  1  0  1  0  0  0  5
    42       2000-08-18 ANA   L 8-9  9-10 BS 1.2 3 2  2  0  2  1  3  3  8
    43       2000-07-28 MIN   W 9-5  8-9f BW 1.1 2 0  0  1  1  0  3  3  7
    44       2000-06-23 CHW   L 3-4  8-9f BL 1.0 3 2  2  1  1  1  1  0  7
    45       2000-05-07 BAL   L 6-7  9-9f BL 1.0 4 3  3  0  0  0  0  0  7
    46       2000-04-19 TEX   W 5-4  8-10fBW 2.2 2 2  2  1  1  1  1  0 11
    47       1999-07-16 ATL  L 7-10  9-9f BL 1.0 3 4  4  1  0  1  0  0  7
    48       1999-07-10 NYM   L 8-9  9-9f BL 0.2 2 2  2  2  0  0  0  0  6
    49       1999-07-06 DET   W 9-8   8-9 BW 1.2 2 2  2  0  2  1  2  2  8
    50       1999-04-25 TOR   W 4-3   8-9 BS 1.1 2 1  1  1  1  0  1  0  6
    51   1998-08-26 (2) ANA   W 7-6  8-9f BW 2.0 3 1  1  0  2  0  1  1  9
    52       1998-08-18 KCR   W 3-2   8-9 BS 1.1 1 1  1  2  1  0  2  0  7
    53       1998-06-01 CHW   W 5-4   8-9 BS 2.0 1 0  0  0  3  0  2  2  7
    54       1998-05-14 TEX   L 5-7  9-10 BS 2.0 2 1  1  0  0  0  0  0  9
    55       1998-04-05 OAK   W 9-7   8-9 BS 1.1 1 0  0  0  1  0  2  1  5
    56       1997-09-18 DET   L 7-9   9-9 BS 1.0 2 1  1  0  0  0  0  0  5
    57       1997-08-23 SEA  W 10-8  9-10 BW 2.0 4 1  1  4  2  1  0  0 13
    58       1997-08-21 ANA   W 4-3   9-9 BS 1.0 3 1  1  0  1  0  0  0  6
    59       1997-06-29 CLE W 11-10  8-9f BW 1.2 2 0  0  1  0  0  2  2  8
    60   1997-06-15 (2) FLA   L 5-6  9-9f BL 0.1 2 2  1  1  0  0  0  0  5
    61       1997-06-01 BOS  W 11-6  9-10 BS 2.0 2 1  1  2  2  0  0  0 10
    62       1997-04-15 ANA   L 5-6  9-9f BL 1.0 3 2  2  0  1  0  0  0  6
    63       1997-04-11 OAK   L 1-3   9-9 BS 1.0 3 1  1  0  0  1  0  0  6
    64       1997-04-08 ANA  L 9-10  9-10 BS 2.0 4 1  1  0  1  0  0  0 10
    65       1996-09-06 TOR   W 4-3  7-9f BW 3.0 3 2  2  1  6  0  0  0 13
    66       1996-08-02 KCR   L 3-4 10-10fBL 0.2 4 4  4  1  1  0  0  0  7
    67       1996-06-07 DET   L 5-6   7-8 BS 2.0 2 1  1  0  3  0  1  1  8
    68       1995-08-01 MIL   W 7-5   6-7 BW 2.0 3 3  3  2  2  1  0  0 11
    

    Comments on Mariano Rivera’s Blown Save

    1. MJ Recanati
      April 20th, 2011 | 10:02 am

      Every time he blows a save it stings a little more because you expect his appearances to be so automatic. Bummer that it had to happen last night but we more or less know the Rivera drill by now: he blows a couple in April and a couple near the end of the year and that’s about it.

    2. #15
      April 20th, 2011 | 10:42 am

      Cutter was a bit flat yesterday. Seems like he went through a stretch last year when that happened. Any one of 3 or 4 things go a little different yesterday and we still would have squeeked by with a win.

      Good to see Coney back!

    3. April 20th, 2011 | 10:52 am

      Somebody check my math.

      68 blown saves since 1995. But, only 38 times did it lead into the Yankees losing the game. Now, THAT’S just awesome.

    4. #15
      April 20th, 2011 | 12:02 pm

      I did the same thing and came up with 28 wins, meaning many of his blown saves (like last night) were not fatal in and of themselves. i.e., he stopped the damage in time to keep the game alive and let his team have a chance to win. Even when he’s bad, he’s still pretty damn good.

      Props to Joba. I like what I’m seeing. He’s breathing fire again, and I think we are clearly seeing that it is in his DNA to be a short reliever rather than a starter.

      Roberston has that bases loaded karma down just right.

    5. Corey Italiano
      April 20th, 2011 | 12:02 pm

      #15 wrote:

      Good to see Coney back!

      Indeed it is. I’m mad I fell asleep last night, did he talk about Conedelstick Park at all?

    6. April 20th, 2011 | 4:02 pm

      @ Steve Lombardi:

      If that’s the case:
      Mo has 566 saves.
      Mo has 68 blown saves, of which the Yankees have 38 loses and 30 wins.

      That means that when Mo enters the game in a save situation the Yankees win 94% of the time (596/634)

    7. 77yankees
      April 20th, 2011 | 6:50 pm

      And this is why the only drama when Mo is eligible for the HOF on his first ballot, is whether he can break Tom Seaver’s all- time record for voting percentage(98.84%).

    8. Raf
      April 20th, 2011 | 7:40 pm

      #15 wrote:

      Roberston has that bases loaded karma down just right.

      The thing that annoyed me about last night’s loss was that Travis Snider couldn’t touch a curve ball all night. He got the game winner on a fastball.

    9. agsf
      April 20th, 2011 | 8:57 pm

      “Any one of 3 or 4 things go a little different yesterday and we still would have squeeked by with a win.”

      This is true of any close game. Why do people insist on repeating these ridiculous cliches? Because they sound good?

    10. April 20th, 2011 | 9:38 pm

      @ hallofamer2000:
      Bottom line, as of yesterday, Mo’s been in 840 games that the Yankees have won and only 148 games where they have lost, in his career.

    11. Evan3457
      April 20th, 2011 | 10:09 pm

      agsf wrote:

      “Any one of 3 or 4 things go a little different yesterday and we still would have squeeked by with a win.”
      This is true of any close game. Why do people insist on repeating these ridiculous cliches? Because they sound good?

      As opposed to saying what, exactly?

      I get your point, but why do people insist on berating others and starting trouble for relatively inoffensive comments?

      Ooops.

      Never mind.

    12. LMJ229
      April 20th, 2011 | 11:45 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      why do people insist on berating others and starting trouble for relatively inoffensive comments?

      Some people just enjoy being ornery.

    13. #15
      April 21st, 2011 | 10:53 am

      @ Corey Italiano:
      Coney seems a bit reserved (so far). Not sure if he’s walking on eggs or just having “opening night” jitters. Could just be that there is less “energy” in the booth with just him and Kenny. I do like the way he disects an AB from the pitcher’s perspective. Since I’m still calling games from behind the dish on a regular basis, I like hearing his perspective on how he would set up a hitter and how he saw a hitter respond to certain pitches in various counts. Still think he’d be a good pitching coach, particularly with respect to helping younger pitchers learn their craft.

    14. Corey Italiano
      April 21st, 2011 | 12:26 pm

      #15 wrote:

      Still think he’d be a good pitching coach, particularly with respect to helping younger pitchers learn their craft.

      Agreed, I’ve been talking about the Yanks making Cone their pitching coach here for a while now.

      The one thing I’d love for Cone to pass to young pitchers is how to win when you’ve got nothing working. Cone, IMO, was one of the best at finding a way to win.

    15. MJ Recanati
      April 21st, 2011 | 1:41 pm

      Corey Italiano wrote:

      The one thing I’d love for Cone to pass to young pitchers is how to win when you’ve got nothing working. Cone, IMO, was one of the best at finding a way to win.

      Because Cone had a baseline of talent that most other pitchers don’t have. That’s not something that can really be taught to a guy with less than Coney’s baseline of talent.

    16. #15
      April 21st, 2011 | 2:36 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:
      Not that every pitching coach has to have been a pitcher, but are you saying we’d be better off having a pitching coach that wasn’t a good pitcher? The Yankees certainly have a lot of those to pick from. I’ll agree with the point that Cone was a quality pitcher, but I’d also suggest that he knew how to pitch and had/has a passion for it. I thought Mel was a good pitching coach, and having met him a few times, he’s far more cerebral than the average ball player. Guidry had skill and passion, but not sure about his ability to communicate. Eiland? Errr? Uh? Emm? Mixed bag all thing considered.

      So I can get a read on your thinking, who would be examples of what you think would make a good pitching coach, and what it is about them that you like?

    17. MJ Recanati
      April 21st, 2011 | 3:01 pm

      #15 wrote:

      are you saying we’d be better off having a pitching coach that wasn’t a good pitcher?

      I’m not saying that at all. I don’t think it matters if a pitching coach was a good pitcher or a bad pitcher or if he was a pitcher at all. I imagine that it would certainly help a pitching coach to have been a pitcher but ultimately a coach’s background and career success (or lack thereof) as a player doesn’t predict their success as a coach. Dave Duncan of the Cardinals was a catcher and he’s a good pitching coach. Ron Guidry was an All-Star and Cy Young winner and he didn’t work out as a pitching coach.

      #15 wrote:

      I’ll agree with the point that Cone was a quality pitcher, but I’d also suggest that he knew how to pitch and had/has a passion for it.

      My point on Cone was simply in response to Corey’s comment that Cone would battle through games when he didn’t have his best stuff. The reason why Cone was able to was because he was a good pitcher. Ultimately there’s not much a guy like Cone can do for someone less talented. He can tell a pitcher what would work for him in those instances — altering your release point, gripping a pitch in a different way, pitching backwards — but at the end of the day it’s only a pitcher’s talent that will determine if he is able to pull through a game the way Cone used to do. Cone was an All-Star caliber pitcher and, like Guidry before him, all that career success doesn’t actually matter once you’re a coach. You can only say so much; the rest is up to the talent of the pitcher you’re coaching.

      #15 wrote:

      who would be examples of what you think would make a good pitching coach, and what it is about them that you like?

      I don’t have a “type” because there really is no “type” that succeeds in baseball. All kinds of different people become coaches. You have career minor league hacks like Buck Showalter and former MVP’s like Joe Torre. You have former aces like Ron Guidry and you have career scrubs like Mike Maddux.

      Now, sure, Cone would seem to have certain desirable attributes but it really doesn’t matter. Dave Duncan and Don Cooper are two of the best pitching coaches in baseball and neither one was as accomplished as David Cone during their playing days.

    18. Raf
      April 21st, 2011 | 3:01 pm

      Leo Mazzone, Johnny Sain, Mel Queen, Joe Kerrigan, Johnny Podres among others came highly regarded as pitching coaches.

      It would’ve been nice to see Tom House get another chance somewhere, but I don’t know if he’s interested in getting back into MLB. I’d like to see a Mike Marshall get a shot, or at least have some of his ideas incorporated into a program.

      I really like what Nolan Ryan is doing in Texas with his pitchers.

    19. MJ Recanati
      April 21st, 2011 | 3:08 pm

      Raf wrote:

      I’d like to see a Mike Marshall get a shot, or at least have some of his ideas incorporated into a program.

      At 68 years old he’s probably too old to get back into coaching after being away from the MLB game for 30 years.

      I am definitely surprised, however, that some team hasn’t scooped him up as a paid consultant/roving instructor so he could work from the comfort of a warm-weather spring training site in Florida or Arizona.

    20. MJ Recanati
      April 21st, 2011 | 3:12 pm

      Raf wrote:

      I really like what Nolan Ryan is doing in Texas with his pitchers.

      I’m very interested to see how it works long term, given how his approach flies in the face of an entire generation of pitchers that have been raised to observe pitch counts and innings limits.

      The most interesting test case will be when he has a high-priced arm that he can’t afford to be as cavalier with (and by high-priced arm, I don’t mean just a prospect but a bonus baby prospect like a Strasburg or a Price who gets a $5M+ bonus). Will the calculus change when he’s got a lot of money invested in a player?

    21. #15
      April 21st, 2011 | 4:03 pm

      In my view Nolan had a “once in a generation”-type arm. A freak arm and smooth mechanics that are a very rare commodity. Irrespective of how you bring them along, the vast majority of guys won’t be nearly as durable. That being said, it seems there were so many good durable pitchers from around his era (Seaver, Gibson, Baltimore’s studs, Marichal, Drysdale, Spahn, Bunning, etc…) that were absolute inning eating machines. Something changed. CC is a horse by current standards, but a slacker in terms of innings compared to the studs from that generation – I do think CC could pitch on a 4 man rotation but there aren’t too many current others I’d feel confident about. There may be a few more out there than are currently being recognized. Here’s one example to ponder … If you had Koufax today, would you have him grind it like he did, or would you back off and extend his career? Although his home-away stat’s show he was helped by his home park, he was still incredible for 6 years (ages 25-30), and then he was done. Like MJ indicated, if you had him under contract for 4 more years at 20M/Y, I think you’d be more careful. Those ~660 innings in his last 2 seasons were brutal.

    22. Raf
      April 22nd, 2011 | 1:04 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      I am definitely surprised, however, that some team hasn’t scooped him up as a paid consultant/roving instructor so he could work from the comfort of a warm-weather spring training site in Florida or Arizona.

      I think the problem, if you want to call it that, is that he’s too “unorthodox.” The style he preaches goes against everything that has been taught (which to his credit, he has shown why it doesn’t work). Having said that, I was rooting for Jeff Sparks to make it with the Yankees (as a NRI) back in 2001(?); he was one of Marshall’s star pupils. There’s another kid whose name escapes me that was drafted by the Rockies, who incorporated some of Marshall’s teachings into his routine. A couple of my teammates took in his camp back in the late 90′s, I don’t know what became of them. I did manage to pick up warming up with a shot put and incorporating that into my routine.

      @ MJ Recanati:
      @ #15:

      My Ryan reference has more to do with encouraging pitchers to throw. Jim Kaat falls into this category as well. Like he used to say, the arm will rust out before it will wear out. Tom Seaver liked to throw a lot too.

      Listening to Kaat, Ryan, Seaver, Mazzone and Marshall, names that cover a spectrum of pitching, it seems the common theme is for them to have pitchers throw as much as they can. I think there is much that we need to learn about pitching, especially from a mechanical standpoint. There has to be someone other than a Marshall that has done research about this.

      #15 wrote:

      If you had Koufax today, would you have him grind it like he did, or would you back off and extend his career?

      I’d back off, he is 75 after all… :D

      Seriously, it’s a different time. From what I’ve heard, arthroscopic surgery would’ve cleared up the elbow problems he had. But with the 5 man rotation and a bullpen behind him, I don’t see Koufax having the same workload now that he did back then.

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