• Sorielbow

    Posted by on May 11th, 2011 · Comments (14)

    Via Conor Orr -

    Just as Rafael Soriano was ready to leave the clubhouse last night, he felt a horde of cameras and microphones crowding around him.

    “What did I do tonight?” he said. “I didn’t even pitch.”

    That was the point.

    When the eighth inning came last night, Soriano — the pitcher manager Joe Girardi adamantly touts as the Yankees’ set-up man — was nowhere to be found as Joba Chamberlain made his way out of the pen.

    With soreness in his throwing elbow, Soriano took the game off and will have a precautionary MRI exam on Wednesday to make sure there is nothing to the pain that started a week ago in Detroit.

    “I told (Girardi) I wanted to take off before the game,” Soriano said. “I want to make sure everything’s fine. Maybe one or two days and I’ll be back.”

    Soriano had surgery on the same elbow in 2008 as a member of the Atlanta Braves for an ulnar nerve transposition and to have a bone spur removed. He also had Tommy John surgery on his elbow in 2004.

    The perspective he took from those injuries was enough to motivate him to request the night off.

    “He came in today and said he was a little bit sore, so I knew I didn’t have him tonight,” Girardi said. “He saw (team physician) Dr. Ahmad (Christopher), he gets here at 6, 6:30. I knew I didn’t have him. He’s going to get a precautionary MRI. He just said he didn’t feel good today.”

    How soon until Soriano rear ends a garbage truck while getting a hummer?

    Comments on Sorielbow

    1. #15
      May 11th, 2011 | 10:09 am

      Yeah… But on the glass half full side, Joba looked like an freaking animal out there. Breathing fire again. Born to be a short reliever. I’m going to urinate on the shoes of the first guy that looks at Joba’s success and starts talking about trying him as a starter again. This is what he’s good at.

      And, Freddie G gave us both length and quality, again.

      And, Robertson worked his mojo, again, in a tight situation. Some nasty hooks in pressure moments. Nice work by Martin behind the plate.

      If Soriano falls apart, Hughes might plug into a bullpen spot.

    2. Corey Italiano
      May 11th, 2011 | 11:45 am

      #15 wrote:

      But on the glass half full side, Joba looked like an freaking animal out there. Breathing fire again. Born to be a short reliever. I’m going to urinate on the shoes of the first guy that looks at Joba’s success and starts talking about trying him as a starter again. This is what he’s good at.

      The only thing about this is, Joba was breathing fire as a starter too, remember? And they forced him to stop?

      I talked about it back then, and I still wonder about it now…did that bring him out of his element?

    3. Virginia Yank
      May 11th, 2011 | 1:12 pm

      Very clever title Steve.

    4. Ryan81
      May 11th, 2011 | 1:44 pm

      Corey Italiano wrote:

      The only thing about this is, Joba was breathing fire as a starter too, remember? And they forced him to stop?
      I talked about it back then, and I still wonder about it now…did that bring him out of his element?

      Absolutely. Joba has all the physical tools to be a good starter or reliever. The Yankees did a horrendous job making up their mind, and it thus cost Joba some years off his development. Now that he’s in one place, he should stay there for good.

      One reason why I wanted him to be a starter (and is now why I hope he never starts another game) is you have to keep it as simple as possible with Joba. If you gave him the ball once every five days, he’d get into a routine and be able to handle it. He’s not smart or mentally tough enough to deal with all the BS like his starter or reliever debates, pitch counts, innings limits, situational stuff, etc. He’s at his best when he isn’t thinking about what the team will do with him. Just let him know that he’s getting the ball in the 8th inning of close games and let him do his thing.

    5. Raf
      May 11th, 2011 | 2:15 pm

      @ Ryan81:
      Relievers have routines too.

      All a pitcher needs to do is chuck and duck. No smarts nor mental toughness needed. Get the ball, get a sign, throw the ball. Back up 3rd or home. That’s it.

    6. #15
      May 11th, 2011 | 2:16 pm

      Careful, I’m reaching for the zipper guys.

      Don’t forget that his shoulder started bothering him, and then he got ineffective, and his velocity dropped to the around 90 MPH, and he could get his curveball over consistently, etc… Now, I will, of course, acknowledge that the Yankees didn’t so a good job dealing with a young pitcher. Mixed signals and all. But, his build, his endurance/fitness level (not the best), his pitching mechanics (not the best), his pitch repertoire (nasty, but really just a 4 seamer and a slider), his mindset (aggressive), and his intensity level (very high), in short, his DNA, all point toward a closer/set-up role, and perhaps a dominant one, for the guy. If he can give us what he gave us last night on a consistent basis for a number of years, we should all be very happy with that.

    7. Raf
      May 11th, 2011 | 2:56 pm

      #15 wrote:

      But, his build, his endurance/fitness level (not the best), his pitching mechanics (not the best), his pitch repertoire (nasty, but really just a 4 seamer and a slider), his mindset (aggressive), and his intensity level (very high), in short, his DNA, all point toward a closer/set-up role

      There have been all kinds that have started and relieved

    8. MJ Recanati
      May 11th, 2011 | 8:25 pm

      #15 wrote:

      I’m going to urinate on the shoes of the first guy that looks at Joba’s success and starts talking about trying him as a starter again.

      #15 wrote:

      Careful, I’m reaching for the zipper guys.

      Quotes of the month. Absolutely hilarious!

    9. MJ Recanati
      May 11th, 2011 | 8:28 pm

      Corey Italiano wrote:

      The only thing about this is, Joba was breathing fire as a starter too, remember? And they forced him to stop?

      Breathing fire doesn’t make you a good starter. Having at least two effective pitches makes you a good starter. He didn’t have command of his fastball and threw a predictable outside slider when he was a starter (and abandoned his other pitches).

      He might’ve been a good starter one day had the Yankees stuck with him in the minors and taught (or re-taught) him the craft of pitching. But at the major league level, coming off the 2009 season, there was much, MUCH left to be desired.

      In any event, he’s not a starter now and he should never be again. It’s over. He’s a reliever. Let’s all move on.

    10. 77yankees
      May 11th, 2011 | 8:51 pm

      #15 wrote:

      But, his build, his endurance/fitness level (not the best), his pitching mechanics (not the best), his pitch repertoire (nasty, but really just a 4 seamer and a slider), his mindset (aggressive), and his intensity level (very high), in short, his DNA, all point toward a closer/set-up role, and perhaps a dominant one, for the guy. If he can give us what he gave us last night on a consistent basis for a number of years, we should all be very happy with that.

      A stark difference between being a starter and reliever is the familiarity in facing guys 3-4 times in one night as opposed to just a handful of batters for one at-bat.

      Some pitchers can adapt better than others the more they face a given hitter, and some are better off with the sparse nature of being a reliever.

      Following up on #15′s point, Joba seems more suited to being a reliever.

    11. BOHAN
      May 11th, 2011 | 9:03 pm

      @ Raf:
      you’ve never pitched before in your life have you???

    12. BOHAN
      May 11th, 2011 | 9:08 pm

      The thing that hurt Joba as a starter was that he wasn’t aggressive in the zone. With all the “Joba rules” and stupid pitch counts and what he felt he has to be perfect instead of reaching back and just throwing the ball to the white of the plate and letting hitters get themselves out. He tried to hit the black everytime. which lead to him walking to many people. now as a reliever he comes and and attacks hitters early in the count and gets them the chase late in the count. he puts the hitter on the defensive instead of him being on defensive.

    13. Raf
      May 11th, 2011 | 11:02 pm

      BOHAN wrote:

      @ Raf:
      you’ve never pitched before in your life have you???

      Why, yes, yes I have.

      Mt Vernon Knights
      New Rochelle Robins
      Westchester Pirates
      WCC Vikings
      NY Maddogs
      NY Rebels

      Plus my fair share of innings in pickup games. Last time I pitched was 2 years ago for the Rebels. Also coached in the NY Womens Baseball league in 2003.

      Lefty short-armer, sinker/slider/occasional change. Started & relieved. Wood and Aluminum bat leagues. Not as effective as I could’ve been, given some of the fields I played on (Van Cortlandt, Lafayette, DeWitt Clinton, St Marys, among others); shitty fields are hell on a groundballer. Was very happy to see the city pour money to upgrade some of the fields.

      I think I know a thing or three about pitching ;)

    14. Raf
      May 12th, 2011 | 8:42 am

      If you played in the WBA, FBBL or NYCMBL, we may have played against each other. If you played JuCo ball, and pitched against WCC, we may have played against each other.

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