• Now Yankees Upset With Jeter?

    Posted by on May 16th, 2011 · Comments (14)

    Via Buster Olney

    Derek Jeter’s negotiations with the New York Yankees last winter seemed to have been Round 1 in the tense transitional relationship between the club’s accomplished Old Guard and management. Jorge Posada’s episode over the weekend was Round 2.

    And now there may be a Round 3 in the hours and days ahead, after Jeter essentially exonerated Posada from any wrongdoing, in his statements to reporters. According to sources, the club’s management was surprised and frustrated by what Jeter said — particularly in his standing as captain — even after Posada acknowledged that he was wrong in his actions Saturday and apologized to manager Joe Girardi.

    Posada, who is struggling at the plate, was dropped to the ninth spot in the lineup for Saturday’s game and asked out of the lineup, feeling disrespected.

    Jeter, who is close friends with Posada and described him on Sunday as someone he regards as a brother, repeatedly deflected questions about Posada’s actions, and said there was no reason for him to apologize to teammates, after declining to play on Saturday. The team’s front office was so angry with what Posada did that they considered releasing the veteran immediately.

    Jeter had a very different take. “If I thought he did something wrong, I’d be the first to tell him,” Jeter said in the midst of a long session with reporters.

    Is it possible to douche the entire Yankees organization now – the playing roster, field management and coaching staff, front office and team owners? Because, this stuff is really starting to get annoying. Maybe the best thing that can happen from all this is a total meltdown and reboot?

    Comments on Now Yankees Upset With Jeter?

    1. MJ Recanati
      May 16th, 2011 | 1:48 pm

      Jeter doesn’t think Posada did anything wrong here? Great leadership there, Captain.

    2. Raf
      May 16th, 2011 | 1:51 pm

      I don’t believe for one second that “The team’s front office was so angry with what Posada did that they considered releasing the veteran immediately.”

    3. May 16th, 2011 | 2:03 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      Jeter doesn’t think Posada did anything wrong here? Great leadership there, Captain.

      Was there ever any doubt that Jeter’s loyality to Posada is greater than his to Cashman?

    4. Raf
      May 16th, 2011 | 2:41 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      Was there ever any doubt that Jeter’s loyality to Posada is greater than his to Cashman?

      And Girardi and the rest of the organization, I suppose.

      What Posada did was wrong. Should he apologize to teammates? Meh, 6 or 1/2 dozen. He was upset, but not at his teammates. Now had Posada went after them, by all means they’d be deserving of an apology.

    5. MJ Recanati
      May 16th, 2011 | 2:57 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      Was there ever any doubt that Jeter’s loyality to Posada is greater than his to Cashman?

      To me, that’s not really the point. When you’re the captain of a team — ceremonial though the title may be — you should still be able to put your own individual friendships and loyalties aside and perform your duties.

      Posada may or may not owe anyone on the 25-man roster an apology but that’s really neither here nor there. It is neverthelss Jeter’s obligation to his 23 other teammates to make sure that his personal preferences don’t take precedence over his job as the team’s official leader.

      Do I think Jeter did wrong here? Not necessarily. But it certainly doesn’t paint a very strong image of his leadership ability if he’s always going to side with his friends. For a player who is purported to have impeccable leadership skills and a tremendouns understanding of PR, I don’t think this reflects all that well on the guy.

    6. MJ Recanati
      May 16th, 2011 | 3:01 pm

      Raf wrote:

      I don’t believe for one second that “The team’s front office was so angry with what Posada did that they considered releasing the veteran immediately.”

      I don’t believe it either.

      Having said that, it would be an entirely justifiable baseball decision to release Posada sometime in the next few weeks if his performance remains this poor and I think Posada realizes that he shouldn’t give the Yankees any excuses to pull the trigger. I expect a good soldier from this point forward…

    7. May 16th, 2011 | 3:04 pm

      I can see both sides of this one.

      We don’t know if Posada really threw a hissy fit on batting 9th. In fact, before the game, when the line-up was posted, he did say to the media that batting 9th was his own fault because of his performance.

      So, then, say the issue was Posada just being in a bad place, mentally, enough where he knew his head was not going to be in the game – and that’s why he asked out of the line-up.

      Is that any different than a player going up to his manager, after the line-up was posted, and saying “Skip, I got the runs, really bad, and I don’t think I’m going to help the team today. Maybe it’s better if someone else played in my place”?

      Or, is asking out only acceptable when you can’t hold your shit and not acceptable when your head is full of shit?

      That all said, I see the point where people are upset over this – and, I agree, had this been a rookie or a bench player who asked out at the last minute because they were clouded in the head, then they would have been sent down or released the next day.

      But, then again, since when, in baseball, do rookies and bench players get the same treatment as starters, stars, near Hall of Famers, and/or legends?

    8. Raf
      May 16th, 2011 | 3:08 pm

      Steve Lombardi wrote:

      Is that any different than a player going up to his manager, after the line-up was posted, and saying “Skip, I got the runs, really bad, and I don’t think I’m going to help the team today. Maybe it’s better if someone else played in my place”?

      Ask Chan Ho Park

    9. Raf
      May 16th, 2011 | 3:13 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      I expect a good soldier from this point forward…

      As do I, with the caveat that I never really saw him as a bad soldier. He had a blowup, presumably out of frustration. First time in how many years?

      I’d be willing to give him the benefit of the doubt and to let it slide. Now had he been a problem from the get go and finally exhausted the patience of the organization, then that’s a different matter entirely. Or had he jumped the team, then look into disciplinary actions. But as the situation currently stands, it’s okay the way things went down.

    10. MJ Recanati
      May 16th, 2011 | 3:41 pm

      @ Steve Lombardi:
      My issue isn’t so much with Posada’s behavior and, perhaps more to the point, this thread wasn’t about that topic either. Instead, it was about Jeter’s nonchalance to the situation.

      As I said above, the members of the team should know that their captain would treat all of them in the same manner and not play favorites with his closest friends.

      I reiterate, also, that whether Posada’s behavior warranted an apology isn’t really my concern. I just want to know that Derek Jeter is the captain of the entire team, not just of the dwindling handful of people that he likes.

    11. redbug
      May 16th, 2011 | 5:05 pm

      @ MJ Recanati:

      Jeter said there was no reason for Posada to apologize to teammates. He wasn’t saying what Posada did was right. There is a difference. I happen to agree w/ jeter. If Cashman hadn’t decided to make this a nat’l media event, none of us would’ve been the wiser. The only grownup in the room was Girardi who said we all have bad days and screw-up.

      Here again I’m ticked at the yankees. Why did they find it necessary to tell the press there was a conference call among mgnt, ownership and Jeter? Why is Olney, a very reputable reprter, saying, “The team’s front office was so angry with what Posada did that they considered releasing the veteran immediately.”? Well, to me, it’s clear the Yankees want to show how tough they are publically. Just like they did w/ Jeter this winter. Why did we all have to hear the disrepect shown toward Jeter?

      Jeter, Posada, and Mo were a large part of all those postseasons and WS championships in the last 15 yrs. Mo is till going strong. Jeter’s average (while still not good) is better than 7 of those Yankees in last night’s game. Jorge is struggling, no doubt, but he’s dealing w/ being told anyone but him will ever catch a game this yr, in addition to his age, etc. It’s hard for me not to understand his frustration and confusion. Give the man a break. Last night’s fans, and I bet, his teammates have.

    12. Raf
      May 16th, 2011 | 6:45 pm

      redbug wrote:

      If Cashman hadn’t decided to make this a nat’l media event, none of us would’ve been the wiser.

      Posada batting 9th was a story. Posada vs Girardi, was a story. Posada asking out with a phantom injury against their #1 rival is a story. Posada asking out with a phantom injury after saying he was cool with batting 9th is a story. While I generally agree that the local media are generally a bunch of hacks, it’s not hard to put 2+2 together and speculate.

      And this is somehow Cashman’s fault?

      Why did they find it necessary to tell the press there was a conference call among mgnt, ownership and Jeter?

      Follow-up, to finally end the issue.

    13. 77yankees
      May 16th, 2011 | 7:39 pm

      redbug wrote:

      Here again I’m ticked at the yankees. Why did they find it necessary to tell the press there was a conference call among mgnt, ownership and Jeter? Why is Olney, a very reputable reprter, saying, “The team’s front office was so angry with what Posada did that they considered releasing the veteran immediately.”? Well, to me, it’s clear the Yankees want to show how tough they are publically. Just like they did w/ Jeter this winter. Why did we all have to hear the disrepect shown toward Jeter?

      It’s the gang warfare that permeates the Yankee front office these days to anonymously smear through the media.

      Girardi loathes most of the media, so he’s not part of it. I don’t even think it’s the H&H boys either. Hal is low-key, and Hank, foot-in-mouth prone as he is, at least puts his name behind it.

      So from the front office, it either has to be Cashman, or everyone’s favorite lackey (And I’m not talking about the Red Sox pitcher) who’s feeding all this dish anonymously to the media.

    14. #15
      May 16th, 2011 | 8:57 pm

      I thought Jeter gave a very crafty answer… “If I thought he did something wrong, I’d be the first to tell him”. Where does it say that he didn’t say something to Jorge in private? In fact, I’d be surprised if they hadn’t talked about it. Now, as to the need for an apology? Jeter said there was no need for an apology, but Jorge gave one (not sure which of those two came first). Either way, Jorge reconsidered, admitted it was uncool and laid the groundwork to put this behind him and the team.

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