• A.J. Burnett Is The Tucker Ashford Of Pitchers

    Posted by on August 20th, 2011 · Comments (63)

    And, I think we’ve seen enough.

    Just like Mike Griffin, he’s fooled us long enough. We found out about him today. That should do it for him.

    Cashman can take the objective pipe and stick it up his poop chute.

    Burnett is a turd. And, he must be flushed.

    Comments on A.J. Burnett Is The Tucker Ashford Of Pitchers

    1. PHMDen
      November 24th, 2013 | 9:08 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      5 Worst Contracts in New York Yankees History
      http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1406978-5-worst-contracts-in-new-york-yankees-history

      Burnett himself belongs on this list.

    2. Kamieniecki
      November 24th, 2013 | 10:09 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      The major prediction systems were just as optimistic about Vazquez as I was. Look here for their prediction on Vazquez’ FIP for 2010…

      Did the “major prediction systems” use the same methodology:

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Well, I’m weighing the ERA, starts and decisions of their #2, #3, and #4 starters from last year in that:

      Burnett 13-9, 4.04
      Pettitte, 14-8, 4.16
      Chamberlain, 9-6 4.75

      If Vazquez starts 34 games, he can reasonably expect somewhere between 23-25 decisions, and taking the average of those ERA and WPCT above, that means something like 14-9 and 15-10 for an ERA of 4.33….

      LOL.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Nobody, and I mean nobody, predicted Vazquez would as poorly as he wound up doing…

      If you check the waswatching.com archives, a number of commenters were a hell of a lot more accurate in their predictions than you were… I wonder how they did it?

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Dave Collins was pretty awful.

      A comparison of Dave Collins to Carl Pavano, Sidney Ponson, Kei Igawa, Pedro Feliciano, Roger Clemens, Nick Johnson, A.J. Burnett, etc.? Hysterically feeble.

      Evan3457 wrote:

      The general manager at the time that Witt was traded for and then re-signed?
      Gene Micheal

      Gene Micheal, architect of four world championship teams, has since had his name changed legally to Gene Michael.

      @ Evan3457:
      Speaking of feebleness, what happened to “Sock Puppets R Us?” “PupSockets R Fun?” Was that supposed to be funny?

    3. McMillan
      November 24th, 2013 | 11:49 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      The argument is that the post-season is a crapshoot. Which it is.

      @ Evan3457:
      Well, if YOU say so, then it MUST be true. How many more years, or decades, do you think it might be before Beane is lucky enough to win two straight postseason series with one of the lowest payrolls in M.L.B.?

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Dave Collins was pretty awful. Salaries for players were much lower then, but he produced negative value his one season with the Yanks, and then, to add insult to injury, he was traded along with Fred McGriff (and Mike Morgan as a throw-in!) for Dale Murray and Tom Dodd. Brian Cashman was in high school at the time.

      Bergesch was the G.M. at the time of the trade, NOT Micheal (sic). And Cashman was in high school banging someone’s girlfriend – although I have no idea what that has to do with anything. Dave Collins was not a bad ballplayer.

    4. Evan3457
      November 25th, 2013 | 2:11 am

      McMillan wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      Never saw that in print before. Source?
      ESPN. Is that a good enough “source?” There was one team reported to have been willing to assume Igawa’s salary without providing any funds to offset the cost of the posting fee at one point in negotiations over the course of the 2007.
      http://waswatching.com/2010/03/30/the-javier-vazquez-question/
      What were your projections for Igawa?

      Didn’t have any. He played in Japan.
      I do remember reading things like

      …many scouts who tracked him in Japan thought Igawa would be effective as a No. 4 or No. 5 starter.

      at the time. I was hoping they were right, and that Igawa could hold the #5 job for a year or two until Hughes, Chamberlain and Kennedy were ready for the majors. He didn’t and they were all called up too early partly as a result of that failure.

    5. Evan3457
      November 25th, 2013 | 2:16 am

      Kamieniecki wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      The major prediction systems were just as optimistic about Vazquez as I was. Look here for their prediction on Vazquez’ FIP for 2010…
      Did the “major prediction systems” use the same methodology:

      Does it matter? No, not really, because their projection were worse than mine.

      Nobody, and I mean nobody, predicted Vazquez would as poorly as he wound up doing…

      If you check the waswatching.com archives, a number of commenters were a hell of a lot more accurate in their predictions than you were… I wonder how they did it?

      Emotional reaction/wild-assed guess, most likely.

      Evan3457 wrote:
      Dave Collins was pretty awful.
      A comparison of Dave Collins to Carl Pavano, Sidney Ponson, Kei Igawa, Pedro Feliciano, Roger Clemens, Nick Johnson, A.J. Burnett, etc.? Hysterically feeble.

      Not at all. The signing of Collins did as much damamge, long-term as any of those other signings, including Pavano and Igawa.

      Hysterically feeble response by you, Sybil.
      Evan3457 wrote:
      The general manager at the time that Witt was traded for and then re-signed?
      Gene Micheal
      Gene Micheal, architect of four world championship teams, has since had his name changed legally to Gene Michael.

      Mike Witt is the point. Trading for and re-signing Mike Witt.
      Thanks for playing.
      @ Evan3457:
      Speaking of feebleness, what happened to “Sock Puppets R Us?” “PupSockets R Fun?” Was that supposed to be funny?

      Not funny. Just mockery. But in lieu of our host’s ‘community standards’ thread, I’ve stopped that.

      Wish you would, Sybil.

    6. Evan3457
      November 25th, 2013 | 2:18 am

      McMillan wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      The argument is that the post-season is a crapshoot. Which it is.
      @ Evan3457:
      Well, if YOU say so, then it MUST be true. How many more years, or decades, do you think it might be before Beane is lucky enough to win two straight postseason series with one of the lowest payrolls in M.L.B.?

      I dunno; maybe he should trade luck with Friedman of the Rays. He won two rounds of playoffs, and the pennant, with the lowest payroll in the league in 2008.

    7. Evan3457
      November 25th, 2013 | 2:19 am

      McMillan wrote:

      Bergesch was the G.M. at the time of the trade, NOT Micheal (sic). And Cashman was in high school banging someone’s girlfriend – although I have no idea what that has to do with anything. Dave Collins was not a bad ballplayer.

      And who was the GM at the time Collins was signed? I don’t know.

    8. McMillan
      November 25th, 2013 | 10:39 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      I dunno; maybe he should trade luck with Friedman of the Rays. He won two rounds of playoffs, and the pennant, with the lowest payroll in the league in 2008.

      I thought his name was “Freeman?” Or was that another “typo?”

      Evan3457 wrote:

      And who was the GM at the time Collins was signed? I don’t know.

      Mr. Steinbrenner wanted to re-make the Yankees in 1982, so the G.M. at the time of the Collins signing, acquisition of Griffey, etc., really doesn’t matter.

      What is interesting, however, is that this team was able to win the most regular season baseball games for the decade of the 1980s of all M.L.B. franchises without the same G.M. holding the job for more than 18 consecutive months, spending more money than any other franchise for the decade.

      This demonstrates how an idiot like Brian Cashman can secure so many postseason appearances from 2005-2013 with the highest payrolls in M.L.B. And the starting pitching from 1980-89, and 2005-2013, was not that great overall, and in either case, as I recall…

      The highest payrolls in M.L.B, the most regular season wins, close to league-average starting pitching, and only one A.L. pennant in each period (1980-89, and 2005-13)! Amazing!

    9. Evan3457
      November 26th, 2013 | 7:55 pm

      McMillan wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      I dunno; maybe he should trade luck with Friedman of the Rays. He won two rounds of playoffs, and the pennant, with the lowest payroll in the league in 2008.
      I thought his name was “Freeman?” Or was that another “typo?”

      You can cite as many of my typos as you want; until the end of time if it makes you feel better about yourself. Means nothing.

      What is interesting, however, is that this team was able to win the most regular season baseball games for the decade of the 1980s of all M.L.B. franchises without the same G.M. holding the job for more than 18 consecutive months, spending more money than any other franchise for the decade.
      This demonstrates how an idiot like Brian Cashman can secure so many postseason appearances from 2005-2013 with the highest payrolls in M.L.B.

      Well, no, not really. Under wild card rules in effect from 1995-2011, recasting the standings into the current divisional alignment, and putting the Brewers back in the AL Central, the Yanks win the division in 1980, the Wild Card in 1984, 1985, and 1986, and miss the post-season in 1981, 1982, 1983, 1987, 1988 and 1989. If you allow the 2nd Wild Card, you can add 1983 and 1987. But they still miss the playoff 4 of the 10 years in the decade.

      The Yankees, with Cashman as GM, made the playoffs twice as the Wild Card, and haven’t made it as the 2nd Wild Card yet.

    10. McMillan
      November 26th, 2013 | 10:06 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Well, no, not really. Under wild card rules in effect from 1995-2011, recasting the standings into the current divisional alignment, and putting the Brewers back in the AL Central, the Yanks win the division in 1980, the Wild Card in 1984, 1985, and 1986, and miss the post-season in 1981, 1982, 1983, 1987, 1988 and 1989. If you allow the 2nd Wild Card, you can add 1983 and 1987. But they still miss the playoff 4 of the 10 years in the decade.

      Nonsense.

      You can’t say the 1981 A.L. Champions would have missed the postseason (in a strike-shortened season, no less) by “recasting the standings into the current divisional alignment…” “No mathematician or logician would ever let you get away with that.”

      But even you write that the team would have made the postseason in 6/10 years – right – without a G.M.! By spending money! “Duh.” Who was the G.M. from 1980-89? “Duh.”

      The team had the same record without a G.M. from 1980-89, as it has had without a G.M. from 2005-2013, in terms of: 1. the no. of pennants won; and 2. having won the most regular season games – and did so by having the highest payrolls in each period. “Duh.”

      It doesn’t take a Mozeliak to win the most regular season games with the highest payrolls in M.L.B. – anyone capable of understanding the information on the back of a baseball card can do it. “Duh.”

      Evan3457 wrote:

      1987

      And if George Steinbrenner does not engage in collusion [II], and signs Morris, the 1987-88 years might have been very different – again: signing free agents, and spending money. Even Cashman, with a 1986 Topps baseball card, could have made an offer to Morris.

    11. McMillan
      November 26th, 2013 | 10:54 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      [Friedmann] won two rounds of playoffs, and the pennant, with the lowest payroll in the league in 2008.

      With league-average offense, and one of the best pitching staffs in baseball; imagine that. When teams with a low payroll win a pennant, it’s usually with league-average starting pitching…

    12. Evan3457
      November 27th, 2013 | 12:41 am

      McMillan wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:

      Nonsense.

      Factually correct, and your reply of “nonsense” is, of course, nonsense itself.

      You can’t say the 1981 A.L. Champions would have missed the postseason (in a strike-shortened season, no less) by “recasting the standings into the current divisional alignment…”

      Yes, I can, and I did. Worst of all for you, Sybil, it’s right.

      “No mathematician or logician would ever let you get away with that.”

      It’s no more or less nonsensical than claiming that having the best combined record for a 10 year span is equivalent to making the playoffs 14 times in 16 years, or 7 times in 9 years from 2005 to 2013.

      But even you write that the team would have made the postseason in 6/10 years

      A gross selective distortion; typical for you, Sybil.
      That’s only under the rules starting from 2012.

      – right – without a G.M.! By spending money! “Duh.” Who was the G.M. from 1980-89? “Duh.”

      And they won…nothing.

      The team had the same record without a G.M. from 1980-89, as it has had without a G.M. from 2005-2013, in terms of: 1. the no. of pennants won; and 2. having won the most regular season games – and did so by having the highest payrolls in each period. “Duh.”

      But not titles, which is more important than either of the other two. And not by a little.

      It doesn’t take a Mozeliak to win the most regular season games with the highest payrolls in M.L.B. – anyone capable of understanding the information on the back of a baseball card can do it. “Duh.”

      And winning the most games in the regular season over a 10 year span is worth…0 titles.

      And if George Steinbrenner does not engage in collusion [II], and signs Morris, the 1987-88 years might have been very different – again:

      And if my grandmother had wheels, she’d be a trolley car.
      And no, I don’t mean that literally, Sybil.

      signing free agents, and spending money. Even Cashman, with a 1986 Topps baseball card, could have made an offer to Morris.

      Assumes that Morris would’ve followed the money, and taken the chaos that comes with the Yankees. He would’ve, probably, but the chaos was building, and free agents would start staying away from the Yankees shortly thereafter because of that, and because they looked like a loser.

    13. Evan3457
      November 27th, 2013 | 12:43 am

      McMillan wrote:

      Evan3457 wrote:
      [Friedmann] won two rounds of playoffs, and the pennant, with the lowest payroll in the league in 2008.
      With league-average offense, and one of the best pitching staffs in baseball; imagine that. When teams with a low payroll win a pennant, it’s usually with league-average starting pitching…

      Considerably better than league average, most of the time.
      But then, we already know this, because teams that win the pennant are usually good at most things. Or they get hot at the things they’re not good at, and stay good at the things they do well. Or they get lucky, and a dynasty gets out of the way for a year.

      Or some combination of the three.