• Fundamentals

    Posted by on October 21st, 2011 · Comments (10)

    Anyone else watching how the Rangers went about their business in the 9th inning of Game 2 last night think “My goodness, why couldn’t the Yankees do this in Game 5 of the ALDS this year?!?”

    And, if you did, who do you blame for it not happening? The Yankees players? Girardi? Both? Neither?

    Comments on Fundamentals

    1. Garcia
      October 21st, 2011 | 12:24 pm

      Players. The were put in a position where their talents would have altered the score. Girardi only gets blame for the 9th inning of game 2, otherwise, I didn’t have any issue with Girardi this year. I actually think he did his best work this year.

      The players failed, bottom line.

    2. MJ Recanati
      October 21st, 2011 | 12:46 pm

      I’m not following your critique or question. What did the Rangers do that the Yankees couldn’t do?

      Ian Kinsler singled into the so-called Bermuda Triangle between SS, LF and CF. He then stole second base and advanced to third on Elvis Andrus’s single. Andrus advanced to second on Albert Pujols’s inability to properly cut off the ball thrown by the outfielder. Kinsler scored on Hamilton’s first-pitch sac fly.

      Are you saying the Yankees can’t get singles, steal bases, advance on errors and score on sac flies? Um…if that’s what you’re saying, that’s just not a true statement.

    3. October 21st, 2011 | 12:56 pm

      MJ Recanati wrote:

      What did the Rangers do that the Yankees couldn’t do?

      Sac Fly, for example. Rangers got two when they needed them. A-Rod could not, or even make contact, when he came up with the bases loaded, in the 7th, IIRC.

    4. MJ Recanati
      October 21st, 2011 | 1:03 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      Sac Fly, for example. Rangers got two when they needed them. A-Rod could not, or even make contact, when he came up with the bases loaded, in the 7th, IIRC.

      In the one example you cite — Game 5, 7th inning — you are correct, the Yankees failed to execute what the Rangers executed last night in the 9th inning.

      Having said that, you can’t take one (or a small series of) failed opportunity[ies] and seek to blame a player, a manager, etc. Failure occurs in baseball all the time. Not everything requires the “a goat and a hero” explanation.

    5. KPOcala
      October 21st, 2011 | 6:49 pm

      Girardi really has a good plan for keeping his bullpen fresh over the long haul. IMHO, he seems almost incapable of thinking outside the box when you get into crunch time. And that is a big reason that Torre (I’m not trying to discount the responsibility of the players) has those rings. I remember watching Bobby Cox walk into a trap in the WS as though he was drugged.

      Here’s what bugs me about Girardi, he is so predictable that I could just scream. He never seems to think outside the box, which allows the other team to get too comfortable.

      And Steve, that’s a reason that I wish you’d “stick around” ;)

    6. Raf
      October 21st, 2011 | 7:44 pm

      KPOcala wrote:

      Girardi really has a good plan for keeping his bullpen fresh over the long haul. IMHO, he seems almost incapable of thinking outside the box when you get into crunch time. And that is a big reason that Torre (I’m not trying to discount the responsibility of the players) has those rings. I remember watching Bobby Cox walk into a trap in the WS as though he was drugged.

      Torre did the same thing Girardi was doing.

      He listened to Rogers, he listened to Cone, both decisions were the same, the outcomes were different.

      The games in Atlanta, he went with Fielder over Martinez due to Fielder’s power potential.

      I doubt Rivera came in when the Yankees were down.

      So on and so forth.

    7. LMJ229
      October 22nd, 2011 | 2:00 am

      I didn’t watch the game but I heard the recap of the ninth inning on the radio and I have to admit that my first thought was how the Yankees didn’t – or couldn’t – do what the Rangers did to win that game.

      The so-called “Dynasty Yankees” played alot more small ball than this club does and made alot more consistent contact. They just battled more every at-bat. Guys like Paulie and Boggs would alter their swings and foul pitches off until they got a good pitch to hit. If the pitcher threw a tough pitch on the corner, they’d just try to make contact and slap it away. But this team today, to me, is maddening in their approach. Guys like A-Rod and Tex refuse to change their approach. If a pitcher throws a good pitch on the corner, they still take their long swing and wind up striking out. That’s the biggest problem I have with this team. Nothing good happens if you don’t put the ball in play.

    8. JeremyM
      October 22nd, 2011 | 10:13 am

      I still think Zimmer was the baseball brains behind Torre- which has been confirmed by a number of others who were in a position to know. Girardi doesn’t have a Zimmer.

    9. Jim TreshFan
      October 22nd, 2011 | 11:18 am

      Just out of curiosity I would like to know in general what the MLB average is for scoring runners from third with less than two outs and in particular what the Yankees success rate was in those situations. I’m thinking the Bombers might have been either at or above the average there.

      But it’s funny what difference one game makes. After Game 1 many pundits were commenting on how the Rangers’ runs came via the HR and how Texas might be too dependant on the long ball, particularly given the effectiveness of the Cardinals’ bull pen. After Game 2…

    10. KPOcala
      October 22nd, 2011 | 10:22 pm

      @ JeremyM: Jeremy I’ve heard those stories, but I can’t evaluate Zimmer’s knowledge v Torre. However, Torre’s legacy certainly wasn’t diminished by having Zimmer around to bounce ideas off of from time to time. What Giardi needs is someone like Zimmer, who has the stomach for the second-guessing that comes with playing a hunch. I wonder if New York is right place for Giardi sometimes, he seems more thin-skinned than hard-nosed, but of course is just me speculating. I’m not in the clubhouse, manager’s office, or dugout. Just speculatin’…..

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