• Jumping Joba

    Posted by on March 23rd, 2012 · Comments (22)

    He’s fallen down and he can’t get up.

    Comments on Jumping Joba

    1. MJ Recanati
      March 23rd, 2012 | 11:39 am

      Meh…medicore low-leverage middle reliever who missed most of last year with arm trouble will now miss this season with a broken ankle.

      The only sad part in all this is the total and utter loss of any trade value in #62. His Yankee career only has one more season left (2013) and, at this point, that’s just fine with me.

      Good riddance, fatass.

    2. March 23rd, 2012 | 3:56 pm

      Some reports say that he lost so much blood in the accident that his life was at risk. If that’s the case, it must be a horrible injury. Maybe career ending?

    3. Raf
      March 23rd, 2012 | 4:44 pm

      @ Steve L.:
      Where’d you hear that? I heard it was a pretty bad accident (1010-WINS), but they were unsure the extent of the damage.

      Amazing if it was life threatening.

      What is it with Yankees and foot/ankle injuries? David Adams, Chien Ming Wang, Ramiro Pena, David Robertson and now Joba?

    4. redbug
      March 23rd, 2012 | 4:50 pm

      Apparently it may be career ending.

      I have to wonder what he was thinking being on a trampoline. Isn’t there something in his contract that forbids that? I mean the Yankees got out of Aaron Boone’s contract because of a basketball injury. Even if it’s not in his contract, wouldn’t (shouldn’t) a MLB player know better?

      I found Joba to be a frustrating player. Shaking off Jorge’s calls and always getting lit-up when he did. He never learned. But the Yankees screwed up w/ him too. Reliever (and what a reliever when he 1st came up!), starter but Joba Rules. Tough for a young, thinks he knows it all, pitcher.

      If this is indeed the end of his career, like I heard on WFAN this afternoon, he’ll be a footnote – like Kevin Maas (what a beautiful swing). What a shame.

    5. Evan3457
      March 23rd, 2012 | 5:32 pm

      Raf wrote:

      @ Steve L.:
      Where’d you hear that? I heard it was a pretty bad accident (1010-WINS), but they were unsure the extent of the damage.
      Amazing if it was life threatening.
      What is it with Yankees and foot/ankle injuries? David Adams, Chien Ming Wang, Ramiro Pena, David Robertson and now Joba?

      It’s Cashman’s fault for not hiring a foot/ankle conditioning coach.

    6. Raf
      March 23rd, 2012 | 5:34 pm

      Maybe he made a deal with the devil, and it’s time to pay up?

      Gnats in Cleveland
      Shoulder in Texas
      Elbow in Anaheim
      Ankle in Tampa…

    7. Raf
      March 23rd, 2012 | 5:34 pm

      Midges, not gnats…

    8. JeremyM
      March 23rd, 2012 | 10:27 pm

      Some fairly callous and disappointing comments here from a few folks for a guy that’s probably looking at the end of his career. Yeah, it was a mistake, but he was playing with his kid.

    9. March 24th, 2012 | 8:24 am

      I can go swimming in a pond with my kids. They’re good swimmers. And, it’s not unreasonable for a dad to be out there enjoying the water with my kids.

      That said, as a person with responsibilities – professionally and personally – it would be stupid for me to try and do something in the pond that is risky where I or someone else could get hurt.

      I think that’s what we need to know here with Joba. Was he just playfully and responsibly bouncing on the tramp with his son? Or, was he trying to do something stupid – like a flip, or trying to reach the ceiling, or just horsing around with not enough care – when he got hurt?

      If he was, then he deserves to take the outcome and all the heat too.

    10. March 24th, 2012 | 8:39 am

      Via Bill Madden today:

      You can understand if the Yankees are just as exasperated as they are sad about all this. Here was a guy who was already on the disabled list, recovering from Tommy John ligament transplant surgery on his elbow.

      He’d been explicitly told by the Yankee trainers not to engage in any sort of physical activity that would potentially put his arm in harm’s way. You would think they wouldn’t have had to tell him that, but then there had already been too many things in Chamberlain’s past to indicate he wasn’t gifted with a whole lot of common sense.

      He didn’t handle the instant fame well, didn’t stay in shape in the offseasons and reported to camp overweight last spring.

      Then there was the October 2008 DUI conviction near his home in Lincoln, Neb., in which his police video wound up featured in the Driver’s 13 episode of tru-TV Presents: “World’s Dumbest.”

      It was as if he had a death wish for his career and now he’s succeeded. This is an injury far worse than the blown-out elbow. The broken bone — on his push-off ankle — was out of the skin, blood was all over the place — “he could have died,” surgeons reportedly said — and very likely it will take more than one surgery to put everything back together.

      It is highly unlikely Chamberlain will ever be able to pitch again.

      Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/baseball/yankees/yankees-joba-chamberlain-blame-potentially-career-ending-injury-article-1.1050157#ixzz1q2cX05qo

      He’d been explicitly told by the Yankee trainers not to engage in any sort of physical activity that would potentially put his arm in harm’s way.

      I wonder if the Yankees will try and void his contract now if it is a career ending thing?

    11. Evan3457
      March 24th, 2012 | 10:06 am

      If they did, it would be horrible publicity for them.

      If I were them, I’d wait until the end of the year to evaluate his progress. Then I’d let him go if he showed none.

    12. JeremyM
      March 24th, 2012 | 12:05 pm

      Steve, seeing as we don’t know the circumstances, don’t you feel we should probably wait to start in with the jokes? Or joke first, sort the truth out later? What we do know is that the guy’s career is very likely over and that he was playing with his son- yes, on a trampoline, but a trampoline isn’t inherently dangerous.

    13. March 24th, 2012 | 12:54 pm

      @ JeremyM:

      Trampoline-related injuries are responsible for as many as 92,000 emergency-room visits annually.

      Source: http://www.parents.com/toddlers-preschoolers/health/sick-toddler/what-er-doctors-wish-you-knew/

      The number of emergency room visits by children injured on trampolines has more than doubled over the past decade, a new study shows.

      There were just over half a million such visits in the U.S. in 2000-2005, compared to a quarter-million in 1990-1995, Dr. James G. Linakis of Brown Medical School in Providence, Rhode Island, and colleagues found.

      “The amount of the increase astounded us,” Linakis told Reuters Health, noting that in 1999, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) urged pediatricians to tell parents not to buy trampolines for home use, or let their children use home trampolines. “For whatever reason the message doesn’t seem to be getting through,” he said.

      Source: http://www.reuters.com/article/2007/07/12/us-trampoline-injuries-idUSCOL25621520070712

      How can you say “a trampoline isn’t inherently dangerous”?

    14. shaked
      March 24th, 2012 | 2:12 pm

      92 000 / 311 591 917 = 0.00029525798

    15. March 24th, 2012 | 3:42 pm

      If he went to one of the Tampa trampoline facilities, he very likely would have had to sign a detailed waiver acknowledging the physical injuries – and death! – that coul happen. As for the playing with his kid excuse, couldn’t he just take him there and not jump himself?

    16. BOHAN
      March 24th, 2012 | 7:09 pm

      Its amazing how everyone thinks these players should be living in a plastic bubble when they’re not on the field… he was playing with his kid… stop worrying wether the Yankees should void his contract and worry about wether hell get back to being able to being healthy… theres a lot more that could go wrong with this injury… If infection sets in it could get real bad

    17. BOHAN
      March 24th, 2012 | 7:10 pm

      to being healthy*

    18. March 24th, 2012 | 8:08 pm

      shaked wrote:

      92 000 / 311 591 917 = 0.00029525798

      There are 311 million people using trampolines? Really?

      Nice try ‘tho.

    19. Raf
      March 24th, 2012 | 8:47 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      shaked wrote:
      92 000 / 311 591 917 = 0.00029525798
      There are 311 million people using trampolines? Really?
      Nice try ‘tho.

      What if that 311M signifies the number of people who’ve used the emergency room?

    20. March 24th, 2012 | 11:12 pm

      @ BOHAN sez:

      “Its amazing how everyone thinks these players should be living in a plastic bubble when they’re not on the field… he was playing with his kid.”

      I am not asking him to live in a plastic bubble. But I think it’s an awfully poor choice, when he is a professional ball player whose body is his livelihood, to jump around on a trampoline, especially when he is recovering from surgery, and especially when he was specifically told by the Yankees not to do any physical activity that could put that recovery in jeopardy.

      Not to mention that he was warned in the waiver that he would have had to sign about the possibility of “paralysis, quadriplegia, death” and a litany of other possible injuries, including, yes, dislocation. What, he couldn’t simply watch his kid on the trampoline? Or find one of the gazillion things out there to do that are not dangerous?

    21. Raf
      March 25th, 2012 | 9:52 am

      lisaswan wrote:

      Or find one of the gazillion things out there to do that are not dangerous?

      http://www.stevetheump.com/strange_injuries.htm

      :P

    22. March 25th, 2012 | 10:16 am

      @ Raf:

      Of course weird things happen (although I wonder about those weird injury lists — has anybody ever really fact-checked them?) At any rate, if Joba had hurt himself while playing Candyland with his kid or something, that is indeed bad luck. A 250+ pound plus man recovering from surgery getting hurt jumping on a trampoline is not bad luck — it’s bad decision-making.

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