• What’s The Difference Between Britt Burns & Michael Pineda?

    Posted by on March 30th, 2012 · Comments (29)

    Other than bobby pin usage and the ability to understand what’s being said on Telemundo, at this stage, not that much.

    The latest on Mr. Pineda, the Yankee, via Mark Feinsand -

    If Michael Pineda’s dreadful outing against the Phillies Friday night wasn’t enough to knock him out of the rotation, the soreness his felt in his pitching shoulder would seem to be the final blow.

    Pineda was rocked for six runs on seven hits and three walks in only 2 2/3 innings, earning a chorus of boos from the typically mild-mannered Steinbrenner Field crowd.

    After he returned to the clubhouse, the 23-year-old revealed that he experienced some soreness in the back of his right shoulder during the outing.

    “Tonight, my arm is a little sore,” Pineda said, adding that it felt fine before the game. “When I’m throwing, it’s a little sore. Sometimes every player doesn’t feel 100 percent when they play every day.”

    Although he called it “normal sore,” he admitted that he had been trying to throw harder in his sixth start of the spring, attempting to put some of the questions about his lack of velocity to rest.

    “I tried to pitch my game,” said Pineda, whose fastball mostly sat around 91 mph, touching 93-94 a few times. “I tried to throw a little harder today.”

    Pineda was emotional while speaking with reporters, appearing at times to be on the verge of tears. He pointed to his lack of command as the primary reason for his dismal performance, saying his body was staying open too long, causing a side-to-side effect on his arm that made his fastball cut too much.

    “My slider was good tonight and I threw a couple good changeups,” Pineda said. “For my fastball, first-pitch strikes, I didn’t attack the hitters. I didn’t have good command for my fastball tonight.”

    But Pineda’s mechanics are the least of his problems now that he’s revealed a potential shoulder injury. Asked if he felt he deserved to be in the rotation, Pineda shrugged his shoulders and said, “I don’t know.”

    Does this mean that Jesus Montero gets to play the role of Ron “The Babe” Hassey in this drama?

    Comments on What’s The Difference Between Britt Burns & Michael Pineda?

    1. KPOcala
      March 31st, 2012 | 12:48 am

      Years ago I read an article (Bill James?) about never trading hitting for pitching (talent being “equal”) because of the injury risk. I hope to hell this isn’t the dreaded rotator cuff injury. We all get geeked about top quality, young pitching. But, when you start looking back over the years, there’s only a handful of pitchers that come out in their early twenties and stay healthy for 6-15 years. Even talk of gutting a team for King Felix is lunacy. God, but I was/am looking forward to watching him blowing the gas past Boston’s hitters… Here’s to praying that it’s nothing….

    2. redbug
      March 31st, 2012 | 8:06 am

      For sure hope this isn’t serious.

      Ironic we gave up Montero for pitching, and THEN Andy came back. Cashman said he would’ve made the trade anyway. I doubt it.

    3. Scout
      March 31st, 2012 | 8:48 am

      Cashman’s track record when it comes to trading for pitchers to fill the “ace” or “future ace” role leaves something to be desired.

    4. EHawk
      March 31st, 2012 | 9:49 am

      I was at the game last night here in Tampa with my dad and Cashman was actually sitting in a section right next to me with a couple scouts one of who had a radar gun so I’m sure he was trying to see about Pineda’s velocity. Pineda was actually booed off the mound and the look on Cashman’s face was priceless. I was talking with my dad and voicing my concern with the Pineda deal and I’d like to think it was in earshot of Cashman!

    5. March 31st, 2012 | 10:08 am

      Scout wrote:

      Cashman’s track record when it comes to trading for pitchers to fill the “ace” or “future ace” role leaves something to be desired.

      Amen brother.

    6. March 31st, 2012 | 10:08 am

      EHawk wrote:

      I was at the game last night here in Tampa with my dad and Cashman was actually sitting in a section right next to me with a couple scouts one of who had a radar gun so I’m sure he was trying to see about Pineda’s velocity. Pineda was actually booed off the mound and the look on Cashman’s face was priceless. I was talking with my dad and voicing my concern with the Pineda deal and I’d like to think it was in earshot of Cashman!

      He was probably too busy texting the new Louise to notice.

    7. EHawk
      March 31st, 2012 | 10:54 am

      @ Steve L.:
      Actually funny you say that but while he was there a couple of hotties one of which had some big fake you know what’s came up to him and talked to him a bit and gave him a hug….lol!

    8. March 31st, 2012 | 11:39 am

      @ EHawk: It’s good to be the king, I guess. :-)

    9. LMJ229
      March 31st, 2012 | 12:16 pm

      Scout wrote:
      Cashman’s track record when it comes to trading for pitchers to fill the “ace” or “future ace” role leaves something to be desired.

      Double Amen! If Pineda winds up being a bust, and with Cashman’s track record why should we believe anything else(?) this trade will likely go down as one of the worst trades in Yankees history. (Right next to that other infamous Yankees-Mariners trade!)

    10. LMJ229
      March 31st, 2012 | 12:19 pm

      EHawk wrote:

      @ Steve L.:
      Actually funny you say that but while he was there a couple of hotties one of which had some big fake you know what’s came up to him and talked to him a bit and gave him a hug….lol!

      The guy doesn’t get a second look if he’s not the Yankees GM. That’s why he will never leave this job – unfortunately for us Yankee fans!

    11. March 31st, 2012 | 2:04 pm
    12. Evan3457
      March 31st, 2012 | 2:44 pm

      Shoulder tendinitis and no damage to labrum or rotator cuff. Could’ve been worse.Scout wrote:

      Cashman’s track record when it comes to trading for pitchers to fill the “ace” or “future ace” role leaves something to be desired.

      That would be what? Clemens, Vazquez (I) and Johnson?

      I think that’s it before Pineda.

    13. Evan3457
      March 31st, 2012 | 2:45 pm

      Maybe a serious injury. Other half of maybe is…maybe not.

      Have to wait and see.

    14. Evan3457
      March 31st, 2012 | 2:46 pm

      Oh, now the bean counters get what they want, too, because after he recovers (if), he’ll go to rehab, and then probably a full-fledged optioning which will set his arb clock back a year.

    15. March 31st, 2012 | 4:40 pm

      @ Evan3457: How about Ted Lilly for Jeff Weaver?

    16. Raf
      March 31st, 2012 | 6:15 pm

      @ Steve L.: Or Hideki Irabu for Ted Lilly & Jake Westbrook?

    17. Raf
      March 31st, 2012 | 6:17 pm

      LMJ229 wrote:

      That’s why he will never leave this job – unfortunately for us Yankee fans!

      Best record in the AL last year, IIRC

    18. Raf
      March 31st, 2012 | 6:27 pm

      Speaking of Britt Burns, why doesn’t Clyde King get more love?

    19. Evan3457
      March 31st, 2012 | 7:43 pm

      Steve L. wrote:

      @ Evan3457: How about Ted Lilly for Jeff Weaver?

      On a staff that had Pettitte, El Duque, Clemens, and Mussina? Weaver was supposed to be the ace? It was 2002 when they traded for Weaver, and they had all four of them for the rest of 2002 and all of 2003.

    20. March 31st, 2012 | 9:21 pm

      IIRC, at the time, they were touting Weaver to be a future ace, given his age, etc.

    21. Raf
      March 31st, 2012 | 9:43 pm

      The Weaver deal was portrayed as “the rich getting richer,” not unlike the Braves acquiring Denny Neagle a few years prior.

      Weaver had signed an extension with the Tigers that was team friendly, IIRC. There was a lot of angst at the Yankees acquiring an ace that they supposedly didn’t need

      http://www.baseballamerica.com/today/news/020705weaver.html
      http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20020706&content_id=75412&vkey=news_mlb&fext=.jsp&c_id=null
      http://a.espncdn.com/mlb/news/2002/0705/1402651.html

    22. KPOcala
      April 1st, 2012 | 9:47 am

      @ Raf: wasn’t that more of a Boss move, as well as his obsession with acquiring a Unit? Most GM’s get the benefit of the whole picture. Here if someone bread goes stale or an ankle is broken, it’s Cashman’s fault. Hell the poor guy can’t even chase women in peace…And at the time Vazquez was considered by ALL (most) of the pundits as one of the top pitchers in baseball, ‘sure to win 20/years’, for 15 years straight…When pitchers do the ‘flame-out’ for other teams, well, “stuff happens”. I’m not arguing that Cashman is Branch Ricky, but let’s not get carried away….

    23. KPOcala
      April 1st, 2012 | 9:50 am

      @ Raf: Raf, good balance to that post. Had I seen it I would have not written my post to you above….

    24. Raf
      April 1st, 2012 | 12:06 pm

      @ KPOcala: I still think Vazquez was a solid acquisition, and had Johnson not become available, he would’ve pitched for the Yanks in 2005.

      I don’t think King gets enough credit for his time as GM, I think with him at the helm the Yankees would’ve been able to rebuild on the fly, and put a better quality product on the field from 1987-89, or at the very least made better trades. I don’t think Drabek gets traded to the Pirates or Buhner gets traded to the M’s on King’s watch.

      For all of Steinbrenner’s impetuousness, he had acquired some pretty good baseball men during his time. Too bad he didn’t listen to them as much as he should’ve.

    25. Raf
      April 1st, 2012 | 12:28 pm

      Evan3457 wrote:

      On a staff that had Pettitte, El Duque, Clemens, and Mussina? Weaver was supposed to be the ace? It was 2002 when they traded for Weaver, and they had all four of them for the rest of 2002 and all of 2003.

      Not the ace, but an ace. Weaver was supposed to slot in when someone went down. IIRC there were a few concerns regarding the durability/age of Yankees’ starters. There was a fear that they could blow up at any time

      But yeah, with a rotation of Mussina, Duque, Pettitte, Clemens & Wells, I don’t see Weaver cracking that. Still not sure why they couldn’t just keep Lilly on the Columbus shuttle? Weaver to that point was younger and better than Lilly, but I don’t think the difference was stark enough to warrant moving him. I think Sterling Hitchcock was there at that time too, though I don’t remember if he was starting or relieving.

      Duque was traded before the 2003 season (before, or after Contreras was signed?), and Wells, Pettitte and Clemens would be gone after the 2003 season. Weaver was signed through the 2005 season.

    26. KPOcala
      April 2nd, 2012 | 10:58 am

      @ Raf:
      Raf, some very good points. Although I wonder if George paid more than lip service to his GM’s after the Yanks lost to the Dogers in ’81. It “felt” at the time to me, that the moves that the team made were reaction moves to the media. Think of the Yankees trying to emulate the Cardinals as an example.

    27. Raf
      April 2nd, 2012 | 7:09 pm

      @ KPOcala: The Bronx Burners and his apparent preocupation with the 86 Mets…
      Then again that experiment lasted only a year, and for all their problems they won 90+ games from 83-86. I do wish they had kept Niekro in 86, and maybe let the kids play a little more.

    28. KPOcala
      April 3rd, 2012 | 1:42 am

      @ Raf:True, but even that one year influenced their rosters for years to come, if memory serves….

    29. Raf
      April 3rd, 2012 | 7:55 pm

      KPOcala wrote:

      @ Raf:True, but even that one year influenced their rosters for years to come, if memory serves….

      They seemed to make moves as mormal. Stein missed the boat with free agency pitchers. But guys like Steve Kemp, Jack Clark, Don Baylor among others were signed. I guess where they could, they went after “premium” free agents. The only “NL-esque” player they acquired (provided memory serves correctly) was Rickey Henderson, and he was a talent that you HAD to get given the caliber of player that he was at the time.

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